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Old 03-13-2013, 10:31 AM   #1
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What To Buy, Cookware?

Hi All, New to the forum and I find DC very infomative. Well anyway,I am a weekend cooker and looking for some new cookware. I am using a 8 year old set of Circulon that is starting to wear out. I really like them but is is time to step up and get some new cookware. Probably gonna start with some new pans. I am looking at some Calphalon unison pans. All-Clad is a little expensive but not out of the running. I also see pans that are ceramic coated? I would also like them to be able to go in the oven and dishwasher safe unless dishwashers are not good for your cookware. Any advice and recommendations will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks.

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Old 03-13-2013, 10:42 AM   #2
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My preference is for SS tru-ply or multi-ply cookware. It performs very well, is generally DW safe and durable. You do not need any non-stick cookware except for a skillet or two for eggs/omelets.

All-Clad is great stuff. Check out Cookware & More - Outlet for All-Clad Irregulars for A-C cosmetic seconds at big discounts.

Otherwise, Calphalon, Tramontina, Cuisinart, etc. for lower cost SS cookware.
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Old 03-13-2013, 11:29 AM   #3
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While I do own several high end pieces of cookware that only I use, I actually like mid-range nonstick cookware for everyday cooking. If you're the only cook in the house, that's one thing, but if there are other people (kids, for example) who don't clean out pots and pans right away, the nonstick stuff can be a blessing. They are also good if you are trying to limit the amount of oil used in your cooking (I am).

Just be advised that ALL nonstick cookware wears out over time. If this is the kind of set you end up buying, my advice is to not spend too much, knowing that in 10 years time you'll probably end up replacing it again.
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Old 03-13-2013, 12:02 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
While I do own several high end pieces of cookware that only I use, I actually like mid-range nonstick cookware for everyday cooking. If you're the only cook in the house, that's one thing, but if there are other people (kids, for example) who don't clean out pots and pans right away, the nonstick stuff can be a blessing. They are also good if you are trying to limit the amount of oil used in your cooking (I am).

Just be advised that ALL nonstick cookware wears out over time. If this is the kind of set you end up buying, my advice is to not spend too much, knowing that in 10 years time you'll probably end up replacing it again.
With just a little work, you can get cast iron, mineral pans, and comercial grade aluninum pans to be as non-stic as the best non-stick cookwear, adn they don't wear out. As for cooking with as little fat as necessary, I don't have to use any more oil than I would with non-stick. I simply put a tsp. or so of oil into the hot pan, rub it around with a paper towel to coat the inside, and my food slides across the pan. My Carbon Steel Wok is the same way.

Teh downside to the cast iron is that they are heavy. But the advantages far outweigh (pun intended) the weight of the pan, IMHO.

I do use a non-stick griddle for making pancakes though. I find the heat distribution better than in CI or SS, hence, more evenly cooked pancakes.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 03-13-2013, 12:33 PM   #5
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hey, chief. i was just wondering about something.

do you have a cast iron keyboard?

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Old 03-13-2013, 01:32 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
With just a little work, you can get cast iron, mineral pans, and comercial grade aluninum pans to be as non-stic as the best non-stick cookwear, adn they don't wear out. As for cooking with as little fat as necessary, I don't have to use any more oil than I would with non-stick. I simply put a tsp. or so of oil into the hot pan, rub it around with a paper towel to coat the inside, and my food slides across the pan. My Carbon Steel Wok is the same way.

Teh downside to the cast iron is that they are heavy. But the advantages far outweigh (pun intended) the weight of the pan, IMHO.

I do use a non-stick griddle for making pancakes though. I find the heat distribution better than in CI or SS, hence, more evenly cooked pancakes.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
I do have a nice cast iron pan that I love for steaks, burgers, and chops. And I have a carbon steel wok. And I have several nice La Creuset pieces.

But with regard to SS, the key words are "with just a little work". Like I said above, if it were just me, I would have no problem using them. But I have a college age daughter and wife who are both novice cooks. On top of that, neither likes doing the dishes. So I choose to buy cookware that will practically clean itself rather than cleaning up their stuck-on messes after the pans have sat in the sink for two days because no one else wants to deal with it.

Bottom line: to each his own.
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Old 03-13-2013, 02:54 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I do have a nice cast iron pan that I love for steaks, burgers, and chops. And I have a carbon steel wok. And I have several nice La Creuset pieces.

But with regard to SS, the key words are "with just a little work". Like I said above, if it were just me, I would have no problem using them. But I have a college age daughter and wife who are both novice cooks. On top of that, neither likes doing the dishes. So I choose to buy cookware that will practically clean itself rather than cleaning up their stuck-on messes after the pans have sat in the sink for two days because no one else wants to deal with it.

Bottom line: to each his own.
Steve, don't misunderstand me. I wasn't challenging anything you said. I was merely trying to provide more information to the op than was listed as of my post. I understand completely that your novice cooks, or even seasoned cooks might want the convenience of non-stick cookwear. It's inexpensive, works great when new, and is lightweight. There are people who can't use CI or even SS due to the weight of the pots and pans due to physical limitations.

What you wrote was absolutely correct, and a great post. As said, I was only trying to give the op more options.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 03-13-2013, 03:01 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
hey, chief. i was just wondering about something.

do you have a cast iron keyboard?

Don't know about his keyboard but I'm sure he has a cast iron stomach.

"Milk Carton Roasted Earthworms" will do that to ya.
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Old 03-13-2013, 03:03 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
hey, chief. i was just wondering about something.

do you have a cast iron keyboard?

You know that I have martial arts training. If you're not careful, I may have to show you harai goshi. Oh wait, that was with the 20 year old body. With this body, the best I could do is maybe o soto gari.

And since your my younger brother, maybe I should just take the John Wayne approach, CI pan applied judiciously to the glutes.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 03-13-2013, 07:26 PM   #10
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Thanks folks, Steve, You have some good points. I am not the only one cooking as my wife cooks a lot and my soon to be 6 year old daughter (St.Patricks day baby) likes to help out whenever she can, non stick might be the best option. Bed Bath & Beyond has some Calphalon Unison fry pans on sale and I have a 20% off coupon so I might try a couple of those. I will keep everyone tuned in and thanks again.
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