"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-20-2005, 11:37 AM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,712
(couldn't resist)
:
answer: when it's airborne/incoming
__________________

__________________
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2005, 12:45 PM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
(couldn't resist)
:
answer: when it's airborne/incoming
ROFLMAO
__________________

__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2005, 04:59 PM   #13
Senior Cook
 
Charlotte's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: near Niagara Falls, Ontario
Posts: 316
About Le Creuset, I was given two as a wedding prezzie and used them for years - until they both chipped inside... had to give them up and would not buy any now because of the weight issue. I do own several cast iron frying pans and my pots are SS with heavy bottoms.
__________________
Jocelyne

All things are difficult before they are easy. -Thomas Fuller (1608-61)
Charlotte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2005, 08:35 PM   #14
Senior Cook
 
oldcoot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: USA,California
Posts: 487
We've got a fairly new set of Allclad SS, an ancient set of Lifetime Aluminum Waterless, and five or six cast iron skillets.

The Allclad is great. Beatiful, easy to clean, distributes and hold heat very well.

Much the same can be said for the aluminum - except that some foods darken it, and others may pick up a metallic flavor - one needs to be judicious.

But my favorites are the cast iron skillets. With the several sizes - 6 inch to 15 inch - almost anything can be well prepared in them in relatively small qantities. And eggs should never be fried in anything else! (Properly seasoned and cared for, they are better at non-stick than is non-stick! Just don't wash 'em or overheat 'em.

And. while we're at it, don't overlook pyrex. I prefer it for baking. But it is even more stainless than stainless, it's see-through, and looks nice, too. (No, not great for frying!)
__________________
oldcoot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2005, 01:50 AM   #15
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
I'm afraid there there is no such thing as "the ultimate" does everything best cookware. Each material - clay, Pyrex, Corning, copper, steel, cast iron, porcelin enamel coated steel and cast iron, copper, tin-lined copper, stainless steel-lined copper, tri-ply (as in All-Clad) stainless steel, stainless steel with aluminum encapsulated aluminum disk bottom (which is also called tri-ply by some mfgs), multi-ply (5, 7 or 11 layers) SS, aluminum and anodized aluminum, and nonstick (and there are several nonstick coatings to select from) ... all have different properties - and are the best for some things, but not for others. And, then, there are the shapes of the pots for different uses .... the Windsor for reductions, a saucier for sauces using a baloon whisk, a straight sided pot for heating up a can of creamed corn or boiling eggs.

You can't heat a nonstick pan as hot as you can SS, which you can't heat as high as cast iron.

For everyday cooking ... stainless steel is good. My second choice would be anodized aluminum. For scrambled eggs, or an omlet, I would want a smooth nonstick aluminum pan (not all nonstick surfaces are the same - some are more porous than others). For pan breads such as cornbread, cast iron or thick anodized aluminum - chili, soups or stews - cast iron, or enameled cast iron, but stainless works well. For long simmering tomato based sauces - stainless with a thick bottom - although enamaled steel works with a little more attention (more frequent stirring to prevent scourching) or enameled cast iron.

This comes back to the start of the discussion ... yes, SS is good for basic everyday use. No, it is not going to give optimum results for everything. Yes, you need a mix of cookware.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2005, 05:09 PM   #16
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
I think that every one of us who have been cooking for a while have favorites, based on favorite techniques, recipes, etc. Listen to Michael. A mix is going to give you better service than any one material. I love my cast iron, and cook eggs in it regularly. I only need to wipe a thin coat of oil on it with a paper towel and even eggs don't stick. I love my encapsulated bottom stainless for quickly reducing things like tomato sauce, or for making a stew. I boil pasta in SS as well. I have no use for sitck-free cookware, except my electric griddle, which produces wonderful pancakes and hash-browns, though I can do the same in my cast iron, just not as much per unit time.

Get the best you can afford, and make sure it's durable, not the cheap aluminum non-stick designed to be replaced every two years.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2005, 12:32 AM   #17
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
I knew I'd find a home here...people with my own heart and soul passion for the kitchen. What's the living room for???
__________________
Robo410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2005, 12:29 PM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
living room? awww heck - I bet it needs dusting or something!!! Thanks for bringing me back to the real word - THANKS a lot
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2005, 10:38 AM   #19
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
I'm surprised that someone elese hsan't chimed in with this bit of info. Stainless Steel frying pans are nearly stick free when used properly. And I learned this on these boards. The trick is to add the oil, or fat after the pan is pre-heated. Yesterday, for breadfast, I made easy-over eggs for my wife. I used my small stainless steel pan, using the preheat and then add oil tehcnique, except that I used butter for this meal. The pan cooking surface was hot enough that the butter immediately started browning. I had the eggs already cracked and in a bowl so I could quickly add them to the pan. They didn't stick at all and were a breese to cook.

The advantage of SS over cast iron pans is that they curve from the flat bottom to the sides, where because of the sand casting technique used to make them, the cast-iron has an abrupt change from bottom to sides. It's very difficult to flip an egg, or any food for that matter, with the wrist flip technique in a cast iron pan. It's quite simple to do it with a prperly shaped SS pan.

And except for the fact that I can cook 6 to 8 pancakes at once on the electric griddle, I can still see no use for Stick-free cookware. Between my cast iron, and SS, I have no problems with clean up or sticking problems. You just have to know the techniques. You have to know how to use them.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2005, 12:21 AM   #20
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
I've been saying the same thing as Michael for years, you really need a mix of different pots and pans for different things.

I have one non-stick pan, an 8" frying pan, which I use for eggs and omelettes. That's it.

I have several tri-ply SS pans, soup pots, sauce pans, etc. I have three cast iron skillets, and more will be arriving shortly, as my MIL's stuff makes it's way into my home. I have two stock pots, thin stuff that is inappropriate for soups and stews, but great for gentle simmering. I have an enameled soup pot on permanent loan from my MIL, which I really like, but just wish it had a heavier bottom. I even have an electric, non-stick griddle, and basically use it just like Goodweed does, for pancakes and hashbrowns, although I'll also make grilled cheese and ruebens on it.
__________________

__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:36 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.