"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-18-2005, 07:54 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Mr_Dove's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Denver
Posts: 209
When to avoid stainless cookware?

I posted earlier a bit about stainless cookware. I'm looking at upgrading but I need to make sure that its right for me.

I thought that rather than listing every dish that I tend to prepare, I might ask what dishes or types of dishes are not good for stainless cookware.

For example, I hear that its not very effective to try cooking eggs in stainless (unless scrambled is what you want)

Also, I don't like cooking with oil much. I prefer to cook with an oil based cooking spray.

So, what kinds of dishes really don't turn out well with stainless cookware?

__________________

__________________
Mr_Dove is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2005, 08:07 PM   #2
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Other than eggs, I can't think of any foods that are not well suited to SS. Maybe melted cheese too.

You mentioned that you don't want to use a lot of oil though. You do need to use oil or other fats with lots of things in SS. When using non stick you can get away with a lot less or even no oil or additional fat. You will not get the same sort of browning in non stick though and you wont get much (if any) fond, which are those yummy brown bits you use to make sauces.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2005, 08:37 PM   #3
 
choclatechef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,680
Stainless steel will not brown foods as well as cast iron. Also, it is not the best metal for stews and soups. Cast iron or enameled cast iron is best for soups and stews.

Stainless steel is not the best metal for baking either. Most bakers would rather use tinned steel, or heavy aluminum for baking.
__________________
choclatechef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2005, 09:32 PM   #4
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,370
CC:

I have to disagree. It's not the type of metal that makes good browning. It's heat. You can brown a piece of meat equally well in cast iron, SS or even teflon. The key is a smoking hot pan.

In general, SS (tri-ply) can do just about any cooking task except maybe frying eggs without sticking.

Andy M.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2005, 09:35 PM   #5
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
I have gotten the same sort of browning from SS as I have from Cast Iron, but not even close from non stick. I have used high heat (even though it is not recommended) with my heavy non stick pans and the color difference is dramatically less than when I use SS or cast iron.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2005, 09:49 PM   #6
 
choclatechef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,680
Ok guys, but I agree to disagree.
__________________
choclatechef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2005, 10:38 PM   #7
Cook
 
Stevie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Texas
Posts: 98
I've only recently started using SS and I'm always amazed how well it performs. The only thing I've had trouble with were cold bacon and eggs sticking, but as far as browning chicken or chicken fried steak it's exceptional and does not stick if used correctly. One cool thing about SS is that you can see everything so clearly as the food changes color. It isn't neccessary to add oil to things like ground chuck because it will makes it's own. I dont see how SS wouldn't work as well as Le Creuset for soups or stews, both are heavy and non-reactive.
__________________
Stevie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2005, 10:24 PM   #8
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
I love it that we can agree to disagree and move on. I suspect that those of us who recognise that probably have longer marriages!! I have never really used cast iron (always rusted on me, and please don't tell me how I can make it wonderful, I'll just let my freinds cook on cast iron!), but DO, DEFINITELY agree that browning things is easier in a pan that is NOT non-stick. More importantly (as noted, with enough heat, oil, flour coating, etc, you can get a good brown on anything), though, is that in a non-stick pan you cannot get good drippings for sauces and gravies. You need to get meat and flour particles to stick to the pan to get a good sauce or gravy. My opinion is that any really good heavy stock pot works equally well, assuming we're not going into the aluminum range (a big mistake for me since I do a lot of chili, curry, and red sauce in bulk to freeze). Heavy bottom to avoid hot spots and burning. I know it makes me sound old, but I'm not a fan of La Creuset because of the weight. I'm very strong, but still manage to get frustrated when I have a big casserole I have to lift out of an oven at below waist level. I don't like to add to the weight of the dish I'm making. And I often have freinds helping me who are older and much more fragile. La Creuset is heavy, as is cast iron. La Creuset also chips easily. Everyone should use what they like, but when you newbies write in, think about the reasons some of us love or hate a particular piece of equipment and how it applies to you.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2005, 06:31 AM   #9
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Florida
Posts: 2,409
I don't use my 2 non stick pans very much because stuff doesn't brown that well in them. Also, I don't recommend using PAM or whatever on SS. It will burn on and there is no way to get it off. It becomes one with the pan. A little oi in a very hot pan will go a long way and you will have beautifully carmelized meat, veg's etc. Just my 2 cents worth.
__________________
I can resist anything, but temptation. Oscar Wilde
lyndalou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2005, 11:21 AM   #10
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,264
Not much to add but that you can get burned on stuff (including Pam spray) off by using Barkeeper's Friend.


I use SS or cast iron for basically everything but eggs.

I have very little use for nonstick.
__________________

__________________
jennyema is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:17 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.