"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-08-2013, 08:35 AM   #31
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by artofcooking View Post
Okay, so based on what everyone said, I think carbon steel is the way to go. I want to purchase one from the Wok Shop and am leaning towards the wok shop: carbon steel wok - side handle or the wok shop: selling woks for 40 years (strange color, huh?)

My coiled electric stove is 7 inch diameter and I only cook for myself, mainly Pad Thai and stir fry veggies/rice in wok. A few more questions:
1. What diameter wok should I get?
2. What types of handles are best?
3. Which type of wok is relatively easy to care for?
4. Can I make fried egg, mushroom masala, aloo gobi in it?
Once seasoned, you can use your wok to cook anything you wish, on top of the stove. I've boiled pasta noodles, made popcorn, made pasta sauce, made soups, deep fried, stir fried, and even braised in mine. I like wooden handles as metal ones, though more durable, can get hot. Also, I can't use mine in the oven because of the wooden handles.

Remember, a wok isn't magic. It's simply a cooking vessel made of metal. It's unique shape makes it handy for cooking some types of foods, better than say, a soup pot, or griddle. It works by transfering heat into food by the same laws of physics that all cooking vessels use. It is a very versatile cooking vessel.

I love to use mine as it's a very large wok, for a home kitchen. It also has a flat bottom, which makes it more useful than round bottom woks, for my circumstances. The only limitations with a wok are those dictated by the rules of therm o-dynamics, and your own mind. If you season it properly, you will find it a real dynamic and userful cooking tool. But know this ahead of time. Though it will cook a great many foods, in a great many ways, it won't make waffles or pancakes for you. I'm pretty sure I could coax it into making a strange shaped, but delicious apple pie, if I needed to. And as far as that cooking popcorn thing, it's my go-to pot for that. It does a brilliant job and makes a big batch.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 08:53 AM   #32
Head Chef
 
powerplantop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 2,157
Quote:
Originally Posted by artofcooking View Post
Okay, so based on what everyone said, I think carbon steel is the way to go. I want to purchase one from the Wok Shop and am leaning towards the wok shop: carbon steel wok - side handle or the wok shop: selling woks for 40 years (strange color, huh?)

My coiled electric stove is 7 inch diameter and I only cook for myself, mainly Pad Thai and stir fry veggies/rice in wok. A few more questions:
1. What diameter wok should I get?
2. What types of handles are best?
3. Which type of wok is relatively easy to care for?
4. Can I make fried egg, mushroom masala, aloo gobi in it?
The first one you posted will work good for your situation.

1:Since you are only cooking for your self get the small one.

2:depends upon how you will use it. If you do not plan to put it in the oven wood will work good.

3:Cast Iron. My Carbon Steel wok is easy to care for but my Cast Iron one seasoned better. But Cast Iron does not come in a flat bottom.

4:You can cook all of those. My seasoned woks cook fried eggs with ease.
__________________

__________________
My YouTube cooking channel
powerplantop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 08:54 AM   #33
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by artofcooking View Post
Okay, so based on what everyone said, I think carbon steel is the way to go. I want to purchase one from the Wok Shop and am leaning towards the wok shop: carbon steel wok - side handle or the wok shop: selling woks for 40 years (strange color, huh?)

My coiled electric stove is 7 inch diameter and I only cook for myself, mainly Pad Thai and stir fry veggies/rice in wok. A few more questions:
1. What diameter wok should I get?
2. What types of handles are best?
3. Which type of wok is relatively easy to care for?
4. Can I make fried egg, mushroom masala, aloo gobi in it?
I'm sure you'll be happy with either one you linked. I haven't had the need for a helper handle yet, but I can see where it might come in handy if you have a lot of food in the wok.
I'm not sure those come with lids though. A lid can be handy for giving veggies a quick steam... or making copious amounts of popcorn
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 04:16 PM   #34
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: California
Posts: 37
Okay, so I'm almost decided on 12":
http://www.wokshop.com/HTML/products...d-handles.html
As well as a flat lid:
http://www.wokshop.com/HTML/products...cess_lids.html

I like the short wooden helper handles because storage is easier.
I like the flat lid as it is easier to hold.

I'll probably make the purchase tomorrow unless anyone thinks there is a better pick!
__________________
artofcooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2013, 09:32 AM   #35
Head Chef
 
letscook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Finger Lakes of NY
Posts: 1,880
I had a expensive wok and cooked in it for awhile - then when we moved I could n't find in it in all the boxes but had my cast iron pan - used that - when i finally found the wok it went bye bye and I always use my cast iron as it does a great job.
__________________
One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching
letscook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2013, 12:04 PM   #36
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: California
Posts: 37
Thank you everybody!

I bought the wooden handle wok with a flat lid for $43.51 (a lot less than £219.00!!).

wok with 2 wood spool handles: 12-inchm flat bottom $19.95
wok lids: flat lid for 12 inch wok $11.95
Subtotal 31.90
Shipping 9.30
Tax 2.31
Total 43.51

I really look forward to cooking with this wok and appreciate all your combined years of experience (500 total?!!).
__________________
artofcooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2013, 12:09 PM   #37
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,305
Actually I only feel 500...
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2013, 12:16 PM   #38
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: California
Posts: 37
lol... maybe the total is 404 [internet joke].

One more question actually:
Which utensils and material should I buy for the carbon steel wok and stir frying? Silicone, steel, nylon?
I have some bamboo ones (the round one, the flat one with holes, and the round one with holes), but they get quite dirty and impossible to clean fully... I don't want to mix in old bacteria.
__________________
artofcooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2013, 12:20 PM   #39
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,305
Steel utensils are fine. I like wooden utensils, before using them I soak them in mineral oil, wood and bamboo are naturally anti-biotic. The oil soaks in the pores so they don't pull in liquid and they clean easier.
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2013, 05:37 PM   #40
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,915
I have a bamboo cooking set I received with an electric non-stick wok as a wedding present 28 years ago and I still use them. As long as you get any solid material off, you're fine. From what I've read, the wood pulls in the moisture from bacteria and kills them by drying them out.

Btw, I do a lot of cooking in that wok and it works just fine I have not felt the need to replace it.
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cookware

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.