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Old 12-20-2005, 05:57 PM   #21
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Yes, I have used my sister's. It's fine stuff. I never said it was bad. I said it wasn't a good value.

My only point is what I said before: You can pay a lot less for basically the same quality or pay a bit more for much better. The Emeril name adds $$$ which could be better spent or saved on the cookware itself.
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Old 12-20-2005, 07:00 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
You are very right. People are usually quite unhappy with those very cheap brands. Often though they don't realize that it's the cookware -- they assume they burn things because they are a bad cook.

Any pot or pan will burn if you are not careful. The trick is, with stainless steel, I think it's better to let the heat under the pans come up slowly and gradually if empty and your waiting to fry or sautee something, such as onions bell pepper or celery. Then add your oil.

Regardless of the SS set you use, there's no need to jack up the heat to the moon unless you are going to boil water in them for something like pasta or hard-boiled eggs. This greatly reduces burn or blue spots that won't come off.

But I've used Teflon-coated painted aluminum cookware sets for most of my adult life, and I'm just plain tired of it. The painted exteriors will lose their shine & luster from repeated machine washings.


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Old 12-20-2005, 10:19 PM   #23
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My first set of cookware was Farberware. The stainless pan bottom, though coated with aluminum, was way too thin to provide the kind of even heat distribution you get from disk-bottom or tri-ply stainless pans.

It's a lot harder to overcome the even heat distribution properties of these pans and burn them. It was a lot easier with the farberware.
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Old 12-21-2005, 03:20 AM   #24
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My first stainless steel set was Revere in the early '80's. I hardly see them around now. They've been reduced to being sold in supermarkets like Stop & Shop.

What in the world does a supermarket know about cookware? Well, I imagine that it has to start somewhere. But5 I remember Farberware and yes, they did have a thin bottom. But I've seen even cheaper no-name-brand stainless steel sets in no-name stores. That, also, is an insult to peoples' intelligence!!


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Old 12-21-2005, 05:53 PM   #25
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The Wegman's grocery store chain has come out with its own line of nonstick cookware.

It has like a 5-6MM disk on the bottom of each piece of cookware. Do not who really makes them.
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Old 12-21-2005, 06:16 PM   #26
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I went browsing around in the stores today after my nutritionist appointment and going to the bank.

I went into Macy's and looked around there. While I was there, I noticed some All-Clad cookware on sale. I went over to check it out by picking up different pieces of it and noticed that it felt unusually ligtht! I knocked on the bottom and it felt kind of thin! No thick clad bottoms either!

I thought this cookware was supposed to be heavy, thick clad and solid. Didn't look that way to me! The rivered handles looked ok, but for cookware that's supposed to be so good, where's the quality in it?!

Then I checke dout the Cuisinart cookware. It felt much heavier than All-Clad!! And it looked much better also. Had the thick clad bottoms as well!


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Old 12-21-2005, 06:58 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
I went browsing around in the stores today after my nutritionist appointment and going to the bank.

I went into Macy's and looked around there. While I was there, I noticed some All-Clad cookware on sale. I went over to check it out by picking up different pieces of it and noticed that it felt unusually ligtht! I knocked on the bottom and it felt kind of thin! No thick clad bottoms either!

I thought this cookware was supposed to be heavy, thick clad and solid. Didn't look that way to me! The rivered handles looked ok, but for cookware that's supposed to be so good, where's the quality in it?!

Then I checke dout the Cuisinart cookware. It felt much heavier than All-Clad!! And it looked much better also. Had the thick clad bottoms as well!


~Corey123.

You need to lift up the emerilware which is made by all-clad. You will feel a mega difference in weight than regular all-clad.

In the Consumer report test the Cuisinart stainless steel stick version did worse than the Emerilware.

Does a piece of a cookware have to be heavy to be good???
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Old 12-21-2005, 11:45 PM   #28
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Let's talk some physics here. Cast-iron - poor conductor, brittle, heavy. but, because it has considerable thermal mass, and because the seasoning has insulating properties as well, the heat has sufficient time to distribute itself and somewhat eliminate hot spots. Also, because of the metal density, cast-iron holds more poetential heat to transfer to the food, resulting in better searing and browning.

Stainless steel is also a poor conductor, but is usually thinner, with less thermal mass than is cast-iron. Because it is thinner, it develops hot spots more easily, and can even warp from uneven heat distribution. The encapsulated botom has to be fairly heavy to keep the steel from directly absorbing the heat. The encapulant is an outer coating of 18/10 stainless for durability and looks, and inner layers of either aluminum, copper, or a combination of both. Both aluminum and copper are great heat conductors (great electrical conductors as well), and elliminate the hot-spots in stainless-steel pans to which they are bonded.

The all clad pans don't need to be as heavy as the conducting metal (aluminum, copper, or both) is sandwiched between two layers of 18/10 stainless steel. Then, the entire metal is stamped into the pan shape. So, not only does the bottom benefit from the internal high conducting metal, but the sides do as well. This distributes the heat evenly to the entire pan, bottom and sides.

And glass pots and pans, well, glass is an insulator, pure and simple. It's great for casseroles though, especially the round casserole dishes, as the corners tend to concentrate the heat.

Any questions before the test?

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Old 12-22-2005, 10:38 AM   #29
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TNX Goodweed (as usual)

All Clad is making some of their stuff in China. Not supposed to be as good. It will say on the box if it is made in China or USA.
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Old 12-22-2005, 11:06 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kleenex
You need to lift up the emerilware which is made by all-clad. You will feel a mega difference in weight than regular all-clad.

In the Consumer report test the Cuisinart stainless steel stick version did worse than the Emerilware.

Does a piece of a cookware have to be heavy to be good???


I HAVE the Emerilware set at home, and yes, it IS heavier than the All-Clad set that I lifted up at Macy's. Trust me, the set in the store did not have much wait to it.

Then All-Cald must have come out with a heavier set, as shown in the Chefs Catalog. The one in the store seems awefully flimsy.


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