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Old 03-13-2006, 05:47 PM   #11
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Alright, now I have a better idea.

How am I supposed to know which foods are acidic and which aren't? I had no idea that tomatoes were acidic until I started cooking. Will this just come with experience?

I ran across this website a while ago...

http://www.taunton.com/finecooking/pages/c00007.asp

Click on the "For every pot there's a purpose" after the third paragraph.

Since we're talking about getting name brand vs not, I was thinking this set-up would be pretty easy for an amateur chef to acquire instead of getting a whole set.

brad
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Old 03-13-2006, 06:00 PM   #12
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Interesting article!

I read some of it, but I'll get back to it soon. And yes, stainless steel cookware IS one of the metals not affected by acid foods cooked in it.


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Old 03-13-2006, 06:22 PM   #13
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Weed, that was an excellent primer on cookware. If you don't mind, I'm going to make a copy for a new page in my children's cookbooks.
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Old 03-13-2006, 06:38 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
Well, if you're going to get an SS cookware set, then you might as well get something that's worth while. Why buy crap just to be throwning it away soon? Doesn't make sense.

I was going to do that. But then, I thought to myself; "Why sould I deprive myself of quality?" You only live once. You gotta ask yourself; Quality or crap?


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I never said get crap. I said don't get something like All-Clad which will cost you over $100 for one 12" skillet, especially for someone who is just starting off. Cuisinart, Emerill's (which is actually made by All-Clad), and Wolfgang Puck's makes good mid-range SS cookware.
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Old 03-13-2006, 10:39 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef
I agree that SS is best but you really need to be mindful of temperature control. The more you get used to it the better you'll get.....
I which you'ld elaborate on this Ironchef.

Upto a month ago I used a old 12" SS saute pan with a heavy aluminum bottom, for most of my cooking (chicken, steak, stir fry, braising, sauces etc.).

Used to be able to cook eggs on medium low with butter and never have a problem with sticking. At a notch above medium high, 3 minutes on each side, a 1 1/2 inch steak cooked to a perfect medium rare every time.

Since I got my All Clad cookware, it's like I've never cooked in my life. The same steak on medium high will be black in one minute flat and so will the pan.

In my old pan Scallops or chicken would sear, brown and then release. Now they just become part of the pan.
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Old 03-13-2006, 11:23 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef
I never said get crap. I said don't get something like All-Clad which will cost you over $100 for one 12" skillet, especially for someone who is just starting off. Cuisinart, Emerill's (which is actually made by All-Clad), and Wolfgang Puck's makes good mid-range SS cookware.


I never accused you of saying that.

Those were just my thoughts. At least that's how I thought when I decided to replace all of the old tired worn out cookware that I had.


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Old 03-14-2006, 12:49 AM   #17
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So, would I be better off buying a SS set and just getting a few extra pieces to cover what the stainless can't?
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Old 03-14-2006, 01:07 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crash
I which you'ld elaborate on this Ironchef.

Upto a month ago I used a old 12" SS saute pan with a heavy aluminum bottom, for most of my cooking (chicken, steak, stir fry, braising, sauces etc.).

Used to be able to cook eggs on medium low with butter and never have a problem with sticking. At a notch above medium high, 3 minutes on each side, a 1 1/2 inch steak cooked to a perfect medium rare every time.

Since I got my All Clad cookware, it's like I've never cooked in my life. The same steak on medium high will be black in one minute flat and so will the pan.

In my old pan Scallops or chicken would sear, brown and then release. Now they just become part of the pan.
One of the best things about All-Clad can be one of the most detrimental. All-Clad pans retain and transfer heat very, very well. Because of this, you can cook foods on a lower temp. than other pans and still get great results. However, you may need to add more oil than what you're used to in order to prevent the food from sticking. Because different stoves heat differently, there's no rule that one can really go by other than trial and error. In your case, it would probably be safe to cook your foods on medium--or a shade above medium but not medium high--and add 1 Tbsp. or so more of oil to the pan. If you're sauteeing properly, the oil will not saturate the food. The oil will just be used to aid in the cooking and heat transfer from the pan to whatever you're cooking.
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Old 03-14-2006, 08:37 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phantom of the Kitchen
So, would I be better off buying a SS set and just getting a few extra pieces to cover what the stainless can't?
Personally I like to buy pieces one at a time instead of buying a set. Same with knives. Chances are that you do not need everything that comes with the set. You may, but you may not.
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Old 03-14-2006, 09:27 AM   #20
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It costs more that way, doesn't it?

I thought it was cheaper to buy a set, then add what you want at your leisure.


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