"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-24-2007, 02:19 AM   #21
Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArgosGrill View Post
I donít know CP but maybe it is like everyone else has said and that is because in a restaurant they cook 40 or 50 dishes a night while at home you only cook 1. And when you cook that one you have all the time in the world while the restaurant has a few minutes and aluminum is fast to heat up. My grandpa was a cook on a ship and he swore by aluminum for searing and sautes but I hate trying to clean it. I guess he never taught me that secret?
The secret is called "Barkeepers Friend" that stuff cleans great..
__________________

__________________
-Cp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2007, 08:01 AM   #22
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Restaurants would go out of business if they had to stock their kitchen with All Clad or other expensive cookware and it would work no better then the stuff they use now.

When you bring your All Clad or other home kitchen cookware home you will notice that they say in the literature that comes with it that this is not for professional use and the warranty will not cover commercial use. That and what it looks like are a big part of why you buy those brands.

I do not completely agree with the people who say that buying high quality cookware will not help improve the average home cook. High quality cookware is usually clad and will have less hot spots then lower quality stuff. If you do not know what you are doing then these things become ever more important. A good chef will know how to play with the heat and the pan and get the result they want out of inferior tools (I am NOT saying that the stuff used in restaurants is inferior).

The same goes for the photography comment. I am a semi-pro photographer and I understand the frustration with the comment about you must have a great camera to have gotten that shot. A good photographer can get an award winning shot from a camera phone, however for an average photographer (or less) a better camera WILL get you a better picture. If you have a camera that focuses better, had more accurate color reproduction, truer white balance, etc. then you will have a better shot then if you had a camera that does not do those things as well.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2007, 09:39 AM   #23
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,894
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
I do not completely agree with the people who say that buying high quality cookware will not help improve the average home cook. High quality cookware is usually clad and will have less hot spots then lower quality stuff. If you do not know what you are doing then these things become ever more important. A good chef will know how to play with the heat and the pan and get the result they want out of inferior tools (I am NOT saying that the stuff used in restaurants is inferior).
I agree, GB. I used the same inexpensive pans for 15 years, since I was first married. Then I bought an All-Clad saute pan about 5 years ago and was amazed at the difference it made in my cooking. I don't remember now what impressed me so much - I think it did have to do with more even heating - but I use it for much of my cooking now, except for things that do better in cast iron.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2007, 09:50 AM   #24
Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
Restaurants would go out of business if they had to stock their kitchen with All Clad or other expensive cookware and it would work no better then the stuff they use now.

When you bring your All Clad or other home kitchen cookware home you will notice that they say in the literature that comes with it that this is not for professional use and the warranty will not cover commercial use. That and what it looks like are a big part of why you buy those brands.

I do not completely agree with the people who say that buying high quality cookware will not help improve the average home cook. High quality cookware is usually clad and will have less hot spots then lower quality stuff. If you do not know what you are doing then these things become ever more important. A good chef will know how to play with the heat and the pan and get the result they want out of inferior tools (I am NOT saying that the stuff used in restaurants is inferior).

The same goes for the photography comment. I am a semi-pro photographer and I understand the frustration with the comment about you must have a great camera to have gotten that shot. A good photographer can get an award winning shot from a camera phone, however for an average photographer (or less) a better camera WILL get you a better picture. If you have a camera that focuses better, had more accurate color reproduction, truer white balance, etc. then you will have a better shot then if you had a camera that does not do those things as well.
To your point, the camera phone may take a good shot in terms of composition, but a Canon Digital SLR in that same shot would capture far superior detail, lighting etc....

It's true that the gear doesn't make the cook, but the cook can sure have an easier time creating his "art" with the best gear available.

Additionally, our Calphalon Tri-ply set came with no such notice... It still has a lifetime warranty no matter where it's used...
__________________
-Cp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2007, 09:58 AM   #25
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by -Cp View Post
To your point, the camera phone may take a good shot in terms of composition, but a Canon Digital SLR in that same shot would capture far superior detail, lighting etc....
It all depends on the type of photo you are after though. If you are looking to get a shot with a lot of grain and maybe some blur or something then the SLR may not be superior. Different tools for different jobs,
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2007, 09:59 AM   #26
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArgosGrill View Post
Oh its slang? LOL. Well I feel dumb now. Why does ghetto mean rundown? Did the Jews live in rundown places? I remember in history class about the Jews being forced to live on the outskirts of town and in concentration camps during the war but I do not remember it being called a ghetto. Forgive me but hostory was never my strong point. I am pretty good with cars and grilling though! :)
In the times of WWII, Jews went from the ghettos TO the Concentration Camps, thanks to the SS.....

The more modern (but no less denigrating) use of the term "ghetto" has been to refer to neighborhoods occupied primarily by African Americans.

But to get to the REAL question, no matter what pans restaurants use, they get to looking ratty pretty quickly because of the abuse they get. Expensive equipment gets knocked around the same as the restaurant supply stuff, and to tell you the truth, the restaurant supply equipment is more durable than the expensive stuff most consumers buy for their home use.

The bottom line at restaurants is so tenuous that most can't afford expensive cookware and the ones who do have it, it was probably donated by the cookware company in exchange for promotional considerations.
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2007, 11:39 AM   #27
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caine View Post
And, of course, you can put cheap aluminium pans on your head to keep aliens from reading your thoughts and stealing your recipes. That won't work with stainless.
Hehehe! You keep on guarding those recipes, man!
Attached Images
 
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2007, 11:44 AM   #28
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArgosGrill View Post
Living just outside Hogansville Georgia with a whopping population of 2700, the internet has made things a lot bigger. Thanks!
Same here...West City, Il has a population of about 800.
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2007, 11:51 AM   #29
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caine View Post
And, of course, you can put cheap aluminium pans on your head to keep aliens from reading your thoughts and stealing your recipes. That won't work with stainless.
DANG RIGHT TOOTING! No alien is gonna get my reciept for fricassee o' marsh rabbit fer dang sure!
__________________
Robo410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2007, 11:55 AM   #30
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fisher's Mom View Post
Do you think it may have something to do with the fact that commercial stoves generally put out much higher BTUs than residential stoves so the heat retaining properties of Calphalon and the like are kind of overkill? Probably the cheap aluminum pans heat up just as quickly on commercial stoves as pricey pans. So why pay for expensive cookware you just have to worry about disappearing, etc. if they don't perform any better in the restaurant? And as far as how they look, ours would probably look like that too if we cooked as many meals in them everyday as a restaurant does.
ALuminum's aluminum. 1/4 thick of either raw or anodized will heat much the same. THe gunk on the restaurant pan is the seasoning...burnt on oil and grease which is sealing the pores of the pan. It is doing the same thing the anodizing is doing for the calphalon...making it more or less stick free and non reactive.

But you need a thick pan to withstand the heat, whatever metal it is made from.
__________________

__________________
Robo410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.