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Old 08-23-2007, 08:29 PM   #1
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Why Do Restaurants Use Cheap Looking Pans?

Use such ghetto cookware? I mean most of it is just plain aluminum pans which always end-up looking like junk in just a short time..

Why don't they use something like All-Clad or Calphalon?

I don't get it... perhaps someone in that biz can enlighten me.. :)

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Old 08-23-2007, 09:01 PM   #2
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the standard restaurant pan is an 8" saute (fry) 3mm thick aluminum pan. THe heat transfers well, that crud is seasoning and the pans are run through a steam washer in the back. They buy them by the case lot. Your average line cook has trained on them and is quite competant with them. They get tossed around a lot. Beacuse you want your food in a few minutes not in 3/4 of an hour.

SOme small bistros I've been in with open kitchens keep the sauces etc in fine pans, often copper, but still use the line cook pan for everything else. Few restaurants can afford to use fancy pans for all the cooking.

SOme of the older Hotels with long standing kitchens of reputation, had all copper pans. But those were days of cheaper labor and patrons with cash money.

I enjoy using really fine pans at home, but when I go off every year for my R&R at the next prochef course offering, I usually find good ole restaurant pans in the test kitchen.
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Old 08-23-2007, 09:11 PM   #3
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What do you mean by ghetto? I looked it up in the dictionary and it says it is a part of the city where Jews were forced to live? Are you talking about Jewish or kosher cookware?
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Old 08-23-2007, 09:18 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by ArgosGrill View Post
What do you mean by ghetto? I looked it up in the dictionary and it says it is a part of the city where Jews were forced to live? Are you talking about Jewish or kosher cookware?

Argos, what -Cp was referring to was the condition the cookware was in. In slang terms, it means kind of cruddy-looking and appears rundown.
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Old 08-23-2007, 09:24 PM   #5
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Oh its slang? LOL. Well I feel dumb now. Why does ghetto mean rundown? Did the Jews live in rundown places? I remember in history class about the Jews being forced to live on the outskirts of town and in concentration camps during the war but I do not remember it being called a ghetto. Forgive me but hostory was never my strong point. I am pretty good with cars and grilling though! :)
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Old 08-23-2007, 09:28 PM   #6
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Oh its slang? LOL. Well I feel dumb now. Why does ghetto mean rundown? Did the Jews live in rundown places? I remember in history class about the Jews being forced to live on the outskirts of town and in concentration camps during the war but I do not remember it being called a ghetto. Forgive me but hostory was never my strong point. I am pretty good with cars and grilling though! :)
That's okay. We all learn something new every day. Just keep your eyes and ears open. We live in a big world that's gotten even bigger with the advent of the Internet. Cheers!
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Old 08-23-2007, 09:33 PM   #7
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Living just outside Hogansville Georgia with a whopping population of 2700, the internet has made things a lot bigger. Thanks!
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Old 08-23-2007, 10:54 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Robo410 View Post
the standard restaurant pan is an 8" saute (fry) 3mm thick aluminum pan. THe heat transfers well, that crud is seasoning and the pans are run through a steam washer in the back. They buy them by the case lot. Your average line cook has trained on them and is quite competant with them. They get tossed around a lot. Beacuse you want your food in a few minutes not in 3/4 of an hour.

SOme small bistros I've been in with open kitchens keep the sauces etc in fine pans, often copper, but still use the line cook pan for everything else. Few restaurants can afford to use fancy pans for all the cooking.

SOme of the older Hotels with long standing kitchens of reputation, had all copper pans. But those were days of cheaper labor and patrons with cash money.

I enjoy using really fine pans at home, but when I go off every year for my R&R at the next prochef course offering, I usually find good ole restaurant pans in the test kitchen.
I'm aware of Aluminum's great heat transfer, but I'm not convinced yet that it's the safest thing to prepare foods on with the potential for health risks associated with aluminum intake, no?
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Old 08-23-2007, 11:06 PM   #9
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The health risks attached to aluminum are baseless.

Shortly after the raw aluminum and alzheimer's disease claims were made, they were debunked as wrong. Unforutnately, the retraction never gets the same coverage as the incorrect statement. It just isn't dramatic enough for the evening news.

Raw aluminum will react with acidic foods, discoloring both the pan and the food in it as well as changing the taste for the worse.
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Old 08-23-2007, 11:17 PM   #10
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Not trying to cast aspersions on restaurant cookstaff here, but were I a restaurant owner I would have serious concerns that more expensive cookware would go walking out the back door...to be sold on Ebay or Craigslist!
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