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Old 09-20-2017, 07:42 PM   #11
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As a former beer brewer myself I have some advice. Pay strict attention to the cleanliness, especially when you bottle it. Wine has higher alcohol content and is more forgiving.
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Old 09-20-2017, 08:05 PM   #12
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As a former beer brewer myself I have some advice. Pay strict attention to the cleanliness, especially when you bottle it. Wine has higher alcohol content and is more forgiving.
Thanks, any brewing/ bottling tips welcome.

I seemed to do ok with the wine, but that was years ago so its as if Im starting all over again. Doing it more for fun than anything else. Also gives me something to do over the winter ( along with my aquaponics and mushroom growing).
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Old 09-20-2017, 08:14 PM   #13
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Caseydog, your dog looks pretty angry.

I have a question about beer tastes. Is the hoppy flavor the aromatic flowery smell/taste, or the bitter flavor, or both. Can anyone describe the hoppy flavor to me, thanks.

And another beer taste question. I like guinness, it is filling, a little bitter, thicker than normal beer. What is the main taste?
That's psycho-poodle. Not angry, just a little mad.

Heineken is a good example of a "hoppy" beer. It has that bitterness, particularly in the aftertaste, that comes from hops.

I didn't often drink Guinness, so my memory of the taste is kind of vague, but I seem to remember it as being more grain than hops.

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Old 09-20-2017, 10:44 PM   #14
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...I have a question about beer tastes. Is the hoppy flavor the aromatic flowery smell/taste, or the bitter flavor, or both. Can anyone describe the hoppy flavor to me, thanks.

And another beer taste question. I like guinness, it is filling, a little bitter, thicker than normal beer. What is the main taste?
Guiness? You're a girl after my own heart, bliss. Himself says it's the one beer you can chew. I think it's the malt that gives it that flavor. I agree that some hoppy beer is bitter. Flavor and bitterness depend on what variety of hops the brewer chooses for that particular beer. I often detect a citrus flavor with some of the beer I sample, though. Rather than being bitter, I find it just a little bit puckery.
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Old 09-20-2017, 11:03 PM   #15
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I've made the Guinness beef stew and it comes out very rich. Tastes delicious. Next on my list is the beef bean beer chili and the beer battered fish and don't forget the beer battered onion rings.

You're supposed to also be able to add it to bread dough and have it make the dough rise like a yeast, but the one time I tried that, via a recipe in Mother Earth, my bread didn't rise worth a darn. But that could have been me and not the recipe, too.

One of the things you might want to do is make sure you like the beer you get. Most recipes only call for a cup or so and there's a lot left in the bottle to drink. I have 5 bottles left of the Guinness I bought and I'm wondering how long it lasts bottled. I tried drinking the remainder after using it in the beef stew and just spit it out into the sink. To me it's very bitter, but I don't like beer anyway. I end up pouring the rest down the drain.
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Old 09-20-2017, 11:43 PM   #16
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rr, I cap the beer bottle with a hinged wine bottle stopper and have kept it in the refrigerator forever - or at least until I need some beer again. Unless I need the bubbles for lift, like making beer bread, I just keep using the beer until the bottle is empty. Well, unless I just drink it right after I open it!

I've used the bread recipe from New York Times, but I don't think I can post a working link to them since they've put up a paywall. Instead, here is a close version of the recipe I use, with my changes below the link:

Beer Bread Recipe

Instead of 1/4 cup sugar, I use 1/8 cup (2 Tablespoons)
Instead of 1/2 cup melted butter, I use 2 Tablespoons

This bread is best just after baking. Leftover, it's not bad toasted.

Remember that the flavor of the beer will be apparent in your finished loaf of bread. For almost no discernible flavor, use some sort of "water in a can" like Busch lite. Guinness, on the other hand, makes a rather interesting bread. Be sure you've made a pot of hearty stew.
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Old 09-20-2017, 11:46 PM   #17
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If you make cooked sturdy greens (such as collard or mustard...or kale ), simmer them with beer instead of water or veggie broth. Some cannellini beans, a loaf of hearty bread, and you have dinner.

IMO, it would be better with bacon or ham. Adjust those ingredients to meet (meat? ) your needs.
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Old 09-20-2017, 11:54 PM   #18
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If you make cooked sturdy greens (such as collard or mustard...or kale ), simmer them with beer instead of water or veggie broth. Some cannellini beans, a loaf of hearty bread, and you have dinner.

IMO, it would be better with bacon or ham. Adjust those ingredients to meet (meat? ) your needs.
Um... what isn't better with bacon?

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Old 09-21-2017, 10:11 AM   #19
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I tend to use Mackeson when I can get it. It's like Guinness but a little sweeter. If I can't get it I use Guinness and add a half to a full teaspoonful of sugar. It doesn't make the stew sweet but just takes a little of the edge off the bitterness.

I use Mackeson in my Christmas puddings, too
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