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Old 07-07-2018, 11:15 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by di reston View Post
I would suggest leaving out the glass of wine to drink, but use wine to flavour what you're going what you're going to make. When you heat wine, the alcohol, evaporates the alcohol, leaving the taste milder.

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It evaporates some of the alcohol, but some remains. Depending on how long the cooking time is, there can be quite a bit left.
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Old 07-07-2018, 11:22 AM   #12
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A few months back I caught Milk Street Radio in the car, and Kenji stated that all of the alcohol does not evaporate when cooking. According to fooducate.com:

In tests conducted and published by the USDA, adding alcohol to a boiling liquid and removing from heat immediately retained 85% of the alcohol. However, the application of heat changes the alcohol content dramatically. Simmering reduces the alcohol levels in a liquid as follows: After just 15 minutes, only 40% of the alcohol is retained. After an hour – 25%. After 2 and a half hours, just 5% of the original alcoholic content is retained.

Any cooking beyond 2.5 hours won’t change the alcohol content – 5% is the lowest level so long as there is liquid in the dish. This is due to the fact that water and alcohol are azetropic – when combined, their molecules have a high affinity for each other. At 95% water to 5% alcohol, the evaporation rate of both remains identical.

I couldn't link the article, but you can find it on their site by searching for "When Cooking with Wine, What Happens to the Alcohol?"
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Old 07-07-2018, 04:50 PM   #13
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I usually suggest dry vermouth for people who don't drink wine. The reason is that an opened bottle of vermouth won't go off for a long time, unlike an opened bottle of wine. Julia Child recommended it and pointed out that it already has herbs. Her preferred dry vermouth was Noilly Prat. It's pretty nice.
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Old 07-09-2018, 09:03 AM   #14
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There is no rigid rule that says you MUST use wine in cooking. Obviously bœuf bourguignon isn't the same dish without the wine but if you don't like to drink it you don't have to use it.

If you do and you don't use the bottle you could try freezing the remains in an ice cube tray for future cooking (I wouldn't suggest drinking the defrosted wine but as you don't anyway it's irrelevant). Alternatively, red and white vermouth keep better for the next time. It won't taste the same and you won't need as much but it's a good substitute.

Incidentally I have fish dish somewhere that uses red vermouth - it tends to look a bit sinister but tasted OK when I tried it.
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Old 07-09-2018, 12:40 PM   #15
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I rarely drink wine but when I do it’s white zin (I wouldn’t cook with it).

I keep burgundy wine and Pinot Grigio in fridge for cooking.
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Old 07-09-2018, 12:59 PM   #16
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There is no rigid rule that says you MUST use wine in cooking. Obviously bœuf bourguignon isn't the same dish without the wine but if you don't like to drink it you don't have to use it.
My thing is not that i dont like the way it tastes, I just don't see it as a beverage. As an ingredient, I love using it. But, since I have little experience in drinking it, my culinary wine library ( in my head) is slim to none. To me , drinking wine is like drinking vinegar, or soy sauce or any other liquid ingredient I'd cook with. Like the way it tastes, just wouldn't drink it.

So, Im not opposed at all to cooking with wine, just needed some guidance as what i should stock up on. And thanks to everyone here, i made a trip to the local wine shop and bought basically one of everything suggested Should keep me going for awhile, and help me build up some knowledge and experience ( hopefully good experiences ) on my taste buds.
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Old 07-09-2018, 01:39 PM   #17
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My thing is not that i dont like the way it tastes, I just don't see it as a beverage. As an ingredient, I love using it. But, since I have little experience in drinking it, my culinary wine library ( in my head) is slim to none. To me , drinking wine is like drinking vinegar, or soy sauce or any other liquid ingredient I'd cook with. Like the way it tastes, just wouldn't drink it.

So, Im not opposed at all to cooking with wine, just needed some guidance as what i should stock up on. And thanks to everyone here, i made a trip to the local wine shop and bought basically one of everything suggested Should keep me going for awhile, and help me build up some knowledge and experience ( hopefully good experiences ) on my taste buds.
I’m with you. I’m not a wine drinker, except for a brief period in the ‘90s when I had the privilege of interpreting for an int’l ballroom dance couple who were visiting Japan to teach master classes. They loved their red wine!

As others have suggested, when a recipe calls for wine, I typically use vermouth, although not any expensive brand. It’s cheaper than wine and has a much longer shelf life. I also really like the taste it imparts to my dishes.

I do keep a bottle of ruby port in the pantry, as well as a bottle of Marsala. I can use the port in place of red wine, although it will change the taste of the dish considerably, and one of my favorite plates is chicken Marsala, hence the wine.
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Old 07-09-2018, 04:08 PM   #18
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Since you don't like to drink wine, you probably don't want to buy anything that comes in a large bottle. I would suggest something like Mondavi Woodbridge Pinot Grigio. It's a simple wine, inexpensive, and, best of all, you can buy it in a 4-pack of single serving bottles - the perfect size to keep on hand for cooking. It has a shelf life of about 2 years.

And if you do choose to drink it, it ain't terrible.

Great answer. I buy the small bottles of wine for cooking, too. I always have some in my pantry.

The key thing is not to use any wine that you would not drink. That does not mean the same thing as wine you like to drink. If the wine tastes nasty, your food is going to taste nasty.

If you are not a wine drinker, ask some friends who are wine drinkers what they like to drink, that isn't too pricey. Use that for cooking.

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Old 07-11-2018, 06:39 AM   #19
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Joel, your mentioning of Vermouth reminded me that I bought a bottle of Vermouth specifically to make a dish, which recipe I red somewhere, and it looked very interesting, problem is I cannot remember either the dish or where I red about. I guess old age kicked in early. Now I have a bottle of Vermouth seating on the shelf, that i do not know what to do with. Oy, to cry or to laugh.
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