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Old 04-26-2007, 10:38 AM   #21
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Coffee or Tea molds rather quickly so it must be refrigerated after it has cooled. There are a number of small coffee makers on the market and they look very interesting. With the price of coffee, it would be a good investment. Also some coffee companies offer coffee sold in a personal one cup bag (just like a tea bag). Another alternative is to use instant coffee. It comes in every brew imaginable.
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Old 04-26-2007, 10:45 AM   #22
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You can sprinkle a little coffee grounds around your plants when you water them it will add some nitrogen to the soil.
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Old 04-26-2007, 11:07 AM   #23
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use used coffee grounds for compost and or mix with soil directly. No other culinary uses for that grit to my knowledge.
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Old 04-26-2007, 11:53 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdswife
Left over coffe... is that like left over chocolate chip cookies? LOL!!!
It is at my house! When I make it, I drink it. ALL of it. I've been known to make a 10 cup pot on a Saturday morning, drink the entire pot, then take a nap. I must say though, that as I've gotten older, I have reduced the quantity I make on Saturdays to 8 cups, sometimes 6, if I have somewhere I need to be in the morning.

Until my son got married and moved out, I never even knew the meaning of the word "leftover."
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Old 04-26-2007, 11:59 AM   #25
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Coffee Granita with Bailey's Whipped Cream

4 c hot strong brewed coffee
1 c superfine granulated sugar
1 c chilled heavy cream
4 tsp powdered sugar
4-5 tsp Bailey’s
˝ c bittersweet chocolate shavings

Stir together coffee and granulated sugar until sugar is dissolved, then chill until cold.

Pour into an 8”-9” baking pan and freeze, stirring and crushing lumps with a fork every 30 minutes, until evenly frozen, about 4 hours. Then scrape with a fork to lighten the texture.

Beat cream, powdered sugar and Bailey's in a chilled bowl with an electric mixer until it just holds soft peaks. Place a dollop of whipped cream in bottom of a glass, add a scan cup of granita (don't pack it when measuring), then top with more whipped cream and chocolate shavings. This looks really nice in martini glasses.
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Old 04-26-2007, 12:08 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StirBlue
Also some coffee companies offer coffee sold in a personal one cup bag (just like a tea bag).
I have a Krups KP1010 pod style machines at work (I bought it at a going out of business sale for $49.95), and I have calculated that it cost between 24¢ and 30¢ to make a cup of coffee with it, while buying your own beans, grinding them, and making coffe in a drip style coffeemaker will cost you anywhere from 4¢ and 10¢ a cup, depending on the brand of coffee you buy. In fact, I bought several packages of empty pods and a machine that hermetically seals them so I can make my own own coffee pods with the coffee of my choice. This brings the initial cost down to about 18¢ a cup, and even less once the cost of the machine has been amortized.

Quote:
Originally Posted by StirBlue
Another alternative is to use instant coffee. It comes in every brew imaginable.
Drinking, or serving, instant coffee is like eating, or serving, Franco-American macaroni & cheese.
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Old 04-26-2007, 12:18 PM   #27
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There's a recipe for a black devil's food cake that's been in my family since I was a little girl. One of the ingredients is a cup of strong coffee. It's just about the darkest, moistest, chocolateyist (word? Is now.) in the world. I'll look for it and if anyone is interested, I'll post it in the cakes section.

When I was a child my mother put a thick fudge icing on it. Most of the time when I made it for my family, I just sprinkled a little powdered sugar on each piece as I served it. I didn't think it really needed icing.
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Old 04-26-2007, 12:38 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E
There's a recipe for a black devil's food cake that's been in my family since I was a little girl. One of the ingredients is a cup of strong coffee. It's just about the darkest, moistest, chocolateyist (word? Is now.) in the world. I'll look for it and if anyone is interested, I'll post it in the cakes section.

When I was a child my mother put a thick fudge icing on it. Most of the time when I made it for my family, I just sprinkled a little powdered sugar on each piece as I served it. I didn't think it really needed icing.
Katie,
I'd love your family recipe for the chocolate cake. Cade and Ethan adore anything chocolate and the others won't pass it by either..I've been looking for a good chocolate cake to make them..This sounds just the ticket.

kadesma
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Old 04-26-2007, 12:47 PM   #29
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I've found it. One thing I forgot to mention is that it's baked in a 9- x 13-inch pan, so there's no need to make layers, etc. I almost always have several 1-cup containers of leftover brewed coffee in the freezer for an "emergency" chocolate cake attack.

A cake that size is too big for Buck and me, so I usually bake it in two 8-inch square disposable pans. Freeze one and eat one. Freezes very, very well. I'll go post the recipe. Enjoy!
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Old 04-26-2007, 12:49 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caine
I have a Krups KP1010 pod style machines at work (I bought it at a going out of business sale for $49.95), and I have calculated that it cost between 24˘ and 30˘ to make a cup of coffee with it, while buying your own beans, grinding them, and making coffe in a drip style coffeemaker will cost you anywhere from 4˘ and 10˘ a cup, depending on the brand of coffee you buy. In fact, I bought several packages of empty pods and a machine that hermetically seals them so I can make my own own coffee pods with the coffee of my choice. This brings the initial cost down to about 18˘ a cup, and even less once the cost of the machine has been amortized.



Drinking, or serving, instant coffee is like eating, or serving, Franco-American macaroni & cheese.
Don't berate my mac & cheese. I'd like to see yours hold up in the bottom of a bait bucket on a fishing boat! Many people have a can of instant flavored coffee that they make for an afternoon refresher.

If your pot holds 10 cups (make the math easy for me) that would be anywhere from $2.40 to $3.00 a pot. (I'm just leaving that as cost because I don't want to price out all the other expenses that you mentioned) If you make one serving with a coffee bag that might cost .50 cents, no expense for left overs. While making a lot might be cost effective if you have many to serve, making a little might be cheaper by the spoonful.
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