"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beverages and Wine
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-06-2008, 10:29 AM   #11
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 3,270
I understand your point of view, GPSMD, entirely! We are all somewhat patriotic about our nation's products when "talking" to someone from another country. Australia is rather laid-back about somethings and I think the naming issue is viewed more as a pain than as anything beneficial.

I think the clear bottle used here is as a marketing tool to show that it vastly different from the usual port. All I can tell you about it (other than it being sweet) is it sells out really quickly and I guess they aren't expecting people to use it as a keeping fortified wine.
__________________

__________________
Too many restaurants, not enough time...
Bilby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2008, 01:18 PM   #12
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Odivelas (Lisbon north suburb), Portugal
Posts: 6
Port Wine

Yes, I agree with you. After all, the great majority of portuguese people, don't know what is a "vintage", never noted the words "ruby" of "tawny", and if so, never asked their signification. People just wants good and cheap Port. Just few persons have two qualitys: money to buy a good vintage, and curiosity / culture to knows what he is drinking...
I bet that a lot of millionaires don't know what they are eating or drinking.
But is real pleasure to listen the "connaisseurs", for example, in some television programs. That people that produces the very good Port, speaks like they were "in love" with that. Is a real passion.
And did you know that were the British that have started the Port saga? Yes, is true. The British, during the napoleonic wars, because they couldn't buy french wines anymore. So, because Luso (Portuguese) - British alliance was (and still is) the oldest in the world, they started to produce, to bottle, and transport that to Great Britain (and colonies). For conservation reasons, they started to add some kind of brandy or spirits ("eau de vie") (in Portugal, "aguardente" -"firing water").
But, and thats very important, they never put sugar on that.
The fermentation is interrupted by the spirits addition, so, maintaining the sugar resulting from fermentation.
Some ports have sugar, but not the "Vinho do Porto".
So, like you see, our Port is more closer to you than you think...
__________________

__________________
GPSMD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2008, 12:59 PM   #13
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 3,270
Being one of the Colonies, it is probably where the desire to make our own port has come from! Didn't know the historical background to Port at all.

Galway Pipe is probably the best port I have tried but I don't know how it is truly ranked. I know it was the best for reasonable money at the time (very popular with the young doctors set). (When I say reasonable, it was about 5 times more expensive (at least) than the ports most people were drinking.)
__________________
Too many restaurants, not enough time...
Bilby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2008, 01:54 PM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Odivelas (Lisbon north suburb), Portugal
Posts: 6
Port Wine

Interesting! How you can imagine, I have no ideia about australian port wines, so I don't know how is it ranked. But Galway Pipe, in a "first sight" appears very similar to Vinho do Porto. The bottle, the age, the barrel maturation... And I noted the expression "port-style wines". It's a way of being "politically correct"... The taste is the same? I don't know. But I noted the interesting care about doing a port-style wine, very similar to the portuguese one. Is not a Port, but it sames to respect the spirit of Port. In the same (net) site, you have some portuguese wines and a Vinho do Porto, Barros 20yo. (What is "20yo"? 20 years? I don't know that notation) If so, It must be a very good wine. Is not a vintage, but a very good tawny (blended, barrel-aged port). But you can have 40 years tawnys! Barros is well known in Portugal but is exagerated to say that "is the largest and most respected Portuguese-owned port house". Barros is one of several respected old houses. Others houses include Sandeman, Offley, Burmester, Calem, Ferreira (very popular in Portugal, for the association with "Ferreirinha" (something like "little Ferreira", the famous XIX century widow and businesswoman, that picked-up the family business and maked it famous, againt that time ideas - There is a very popular phrase in Portugal: "Foi vocÍ que pediu um Porto Ferreira?" (It was you that asked for a Porto Ferreira?")), and so on... He have a lot of big names in Port business. Some of them, are not family businesses anymore, and were integrated in big entreprises in beverage industry. But the original names are still used because the names have some "aura" and the production methods and traditions are still used and respected. Is something quite untouchable...
__________________
GPSMD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2008, 10:05 AM   #15
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 3,270
The "yo" bit is "years old". Back when I had Galway Pipe, it was just known as port, not port-styled. Like you say, politically correct.

The auras of businesses are huge business in themselves, regardless of the industry. And their names can often outlive the greatness of their product. Compared to the rest of the world, Australia doesn't truly have those names - we are too young. Most of our (historical) businesses were from England or Europe. Establishing businesses here had to compete with those big names in a different way to a new business in the homeland of the big named business. And now, most of our biggest reputable names are owned by foreign countries. Nothing seems to be "untouchable" here - except certain high flyers that dodge shareholders, employees and the Tax Dept!!
__________________
Too many restaurants, not enough time...
Bilby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2008, 10:46 AM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Well...all I can add is I have a bottle of 2000 Port and I couldn't be happier! I'm broke from buying it...but I couldn't be happier 2000 was a GREAT vintage!

I will reserve this Port for sipping - the other port I have I would be interested in trying the above drink. It sounds very refreshing and I will be using soda, I'm sure.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2008, 07:42 AM   #17
Sous Chef
 
Rom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 715
yum Galway and also Whiskers Blake..and Bluestone from Penfolds lol
__________________
Rom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2008, 08:18 AM   #18
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 808
Quote:
Originally Posted by GPSMD View Post
...
Portuguese Port Wine is protected in European Union and United States.
...
Are you sure about that? It's my understanding that the US does not recognize EU PDO's.
__________________
jet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2008, 11:07 AM   #19
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 3,270
Rom!!!!!!You're around again!! Welcome back!
__________________
Too many restaurants, not enough time...
Bilby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2008, 01:56 AM   #20
Sous Chef
 
Rom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 715
Thanks Bilby, couldn't resist the port thread lol
__________________

__________________
Rom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:11 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.