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Old 12-09-2012, 08:25 AM   #1
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Storing Coffee

My question is about storing coffee prior to use.

I purchase in bulk when it's on sale and freeze it in the original packaging.

I have been putting the - ground or bean depending on what I purchased - coffee into a plastic container and keeping it in the fridge for daily use.

Now I've been doing this for many many years with no problems whatsoever.

However .. I think I need to change that. For some reason over the last couple of months my coffee (same brand as always) has begun to smell just awful while brewing. Kind of smells like burning oil.

It's not the coffee maker - I went out and bought another thinking mine was giving up the ghost.

It's not the water - I've purchased bottled water and tried that.

So my question is simple ... and it's all about how you store your grounds/beans prior to use.

Do you use plastic, original packaging, pottery? I definitely detect difference in refrigerated vs room temp so have no interest in changing that.
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Old 12-09-2012, 08:57 AM   #2
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As a home roaster and certifiable coffee nut, I would say that you should never freeze or refrigerate coffee.

Coffee in any state green or roasted should be stored at room temperature in an air tight container.

Shelf life rule of thumb:
Green coffee beans - two years
Roasted coffee beans - two weeks
Ground coffee - two hours.

When coffee is roasted it begins to "outgas" and quickly looses much of it's essential qualities. Grinding it accelerates this process dramatically. When buying whole roasted coffee beans, look for a "roasted on" date. Leave the pre-ground stuff on the shelf at the store.

Just my .02

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Old 12-09-2012, 01:24 PM   #3
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Thanks for the info forty.
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Old 12-09-2012, 04:30 PM   #4
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I just leave mine sitting on the counter. Never have had a problem. It gets used too fast.
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Old 12-09-2012, 06:31 PM   #5
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Well we do coffee twice a day so it's not like it just sits around. I switched my container to another .. perhaps it was just too permiated with that coffee bean smell .. I don't know what to think. It's in an airtight container but I still keep it in the fridge .. had too many nasty cups from stuff left on the counter ... never had that problem keeping mine chilled.

Thanks for the input .. I appreciate your time !
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Old 12-09-2012, 07:17 PM   #6
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I used a plastic airtight container, kept it at room temp, after a while it started smelling like stale coffee and the new coffee added would quickly pick it up. No amount of cleaners, etc would remove that stale smell and taste. I got a new airtight storage container and the problem was solved. I now keep coffee in an airtight glass jar that can be cleaned.
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Old 12-09-2012, 07:36 PM   #7
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Old 05-02-2013, 05:13 AM   #8
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I love coffee
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Old 05-02-2013, 06:10 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forty_caliber View Post
As a home roaster and certifiable coffee nut, I would say that you should never freeze or refrigerate coffee.

Coffee in any state green or roasted should be stored at room temperature in an air tight container.

Shelf life rule of thumb:
Green coffee beans - two years
Roasted coffee beans - two weeks
Ground coffee - two hours.

When coffee is roasted it begins to "outgas" and quickly looses much of it's essential qualities. Grinding it accelerates this process dramatically. When buying whole roasted coffee beans, look for a "roasted on" date. Leave the pre-ground stuff on the shelf at the store.

Just my .02

.40
Green beans used to come in 20 - 25 kilo burlap sacks.
We store ground coffee in a tightly lidded glass peanut butter jar.
I also prefer green beans for their extended shelf life and store them in ziplock bags, in a dark cellar at (55 - 75F) temp. I roast about 1 1/2 pounds at a time in a cast iron chicken fryer and grind daily as needed. We consume the 1 1/2 pounds within 2 weeks. The freshly roasted beans seem to need 3 or 4 days of out-gassing to achieve peak flavor.
We have two manual coffee mills. We inherited one of the mills 25 years ago and had a Dickens of a time cleaning it up. It's currently over 65 years old. In it's former life it had been last used to grind poppy seeds and the grinding stones were pretty gummed up.
Our other mill is a 5 year old Zassenhaus which we purchased new. It took quite a bit of time and some tinkering to properly adjust and break it in.
Once hooked on well prepared coffee the stuff from most other sources becomes unappealing.
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Old 05-02-2013, 05:37 PM   #10
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I'm not as dedicated as forty_caliber but I do enjoy good coffee. Mine turns out good enough for us, so it works. I buy roasted beans every couple of months, keeping the unopened bags in our basement (never gets above 69 down there) and grind enough for about a week with a burr grinder. I store the ground coffee room-temp in a container similar to this one:

Although nothing beats the taste of coffee brewed right after you take the top off the grinder (probably has something to do with the aroma wafting up) I really don't notice a big difference in flavor when I get to the bottom of the jar.

I've thought of trying to roast my own beans using a hot air corn popper Really! Anyone ever try this method? CoffeeGeek - Roasting coffee with a popcorn popper.) I have an old corn popper I've been debating using like this instead of putting in the garage sale but I can't find green beans in small enough batches. Would hate to get stuck with 24 out of 25 pounds...

If you want to play with your food MrsLMB I say get a grinder and do your beans fresh daily. A serviceable grinder can be had for about $60 (free if you know how to play the credit card bonus game and store discount game ) while a top of the line one can go for four figures - not counting the right side of the decimal point.
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