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Old 04-22-2013, 11:02 PM   #11
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Lots and lots of wine grapes? Is that like Concord grapes, or whatever kind they use?
Not to tangent out but...mmmm yum, Concord grapes. Black grapes are my new fave snack fruit. They aren't as tart as red and green grapes are. They're very seasonal it seems. US supermarkets import them from Chile when out of season here in the US. I bought two bags two weeks apart and now they're out until June, I'm told (short growing season). My fave snack is concord grapes with cheese slices and some pretzel sticks and a few thin salami slices and maybe a green onion on a small plate.
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Old 04-24-2013, 07:13 AM   #12
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Hard to beat scuppernongs for homemade wine, jelly, jam, or just plain eating. JMHO. The local wild grapes....we call them bullous (sp?), are mighty good too.
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Old 04-24-2013, 07:17 AM   #13
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Google informs me that the wild grapes I was referring to are called muscadines.
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Old 04-24-2013, 11:15 AM   #14
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I've had muscadine wine. It's good. If you live in an area where they grow (mostly the southeastern US) you are lucky, Hoot.
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Old 05-02-2013, 04:16 AM   #15
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I don't make beer, but I make about 150 gallons of wine every year,
my god. what do you do with nearly 93 gallons of wine every year?

that's almost 470 bottles of wine!
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Old 05-02-2013, 05:14 AM   #16
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Steve drinks a lot
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Old 05-02-2013, 10:16 AM   #17
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my god. what do you do with nearly 93 gallons of wine every year?

that's almost 470 bottles of wine!
My wife and I drink somewhere around 40-50 gallons (200 bottles) between the two of us a year. Sounds like a lot, but only averages out to around one glass a night during the week, and a couple on weekends.

About 40-50 gallons of what I make goes to my wife's brother and sister. They pay for all the raw ingredients and bottles, I make the wine, and we have a big bottling party every year around Easter.

I also give quite a bit away as gifts, enter it in competitions, or sometimes use it as barter for goods/services. Over the years we've put in an outdoor patio, had landscaping work done, and, this year, are putting in a sprinkler system. All paid in part through homemade wine.

And whatever's left gets socked away for the long term. It's my liquid retirement fund. If stored properly, wine will last 10 to 20 years or longer.
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Old 05-02-2013, 06:37 PM   #18
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i've read there's a whole science behind which wines age well, and which are to be consumed within a year or two.

my neighbor makes about 50 gallons of red wine every year, and then lets the leftover mashed skins ferment some more and then sistills them.

his wine is ok, but his grappa is fire water.
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Old 05-03-2013, 11:45 AM   #19
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Definitely some science there. Oxygen and high or fluctuating temps are wine's worst enemies. Luckily, red wines contain tannin, anthocyanins, and sulfur dioxide, all of which are natural antioxidants. If stored at 50-60 degrees, a full bodied red wine can last quite a long time.

White wines also contain sulphites (contrary to popular belief, they contain about 30% more than red wine, which blows a hole in that theory that sulphites are the cause of "red wine headache"). But they have little tannin or anthocyanins. Most white wines are drinkable for 2 or 3 years past the vintage date. Oak-aged whites, like Chardonnay and some Sauvignon Blancs, get a boost of tannin from the barrels, which helps them age a little longer - anywhere from 5 to 7 years. If you store white wines at 50 degrees they will last longer.
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Old 05-03-2013, 11:50 AM   #20
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And before anyone mentions "red wine headaches", the current thinking is that histamines play more of a role than sulphites. If you are prone to getting headaches from red wine, try taking half a benadryl with a big glass of water before drinking red wine and see if that helps. Don't take large doses of benadryl with wine, though, as it's a mild depressant and the effects can be cumulative when combined with alcohol.
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