"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Knives
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-21-2006, 04:39 AM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 2
Thumbs up 4 questions regarding knives?

I've read through this section and have noticed that many of you recommend purchasing a couple "key" knives so I was wondering if you answer 4 questions for me.
  1. What you define as "key" knives?
  2. Why you recommend those knives?
  3. What brand of knives?
  4. Why you recommend such brand?
Thanks everyone!

__________________

__________________
Mr. Personality is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2006, 09:13 AM   #2
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,378
Key knives are those that are the most versatile, giving you a lot of different from uses from one tool.

The French or chef's knife is considered the first to get by most people. Whether you get a 6", 8", 10" or 12" blade is up to you. This knife will perform all your slicing and dicing needs. It will chop through small bones such as those in a chicken. You can use it to mince garlic.

Along with that, a 3" or 4" paring knife is handy to have around. This knife is a whiz with small pieces of food an close work.

Next, I'd recommend a 8" to 10" serrated bread knife.

Which brand to recommend is a different story. You should visit a cutlery or kitchen store and handle a variety of knives to determine which feel the most comfortable to use for you. I recommend you buy a top quality knife. It will last a lifetime if cared for properly and they are a joy to use.

There are different styles of knives within the types I described above. Some are heavier, others are lightweight. That can be an important point for some users.

I have a set of Henckels Professional S knives. They are very good knives and they may be completely wrong for you. You should try a knife for comfort and ease of use before buying. There are so many choices you should have no problem finding the right knife for you.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2006, 09:45 AM   #3
Executive Chef
 
Michelemarie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Suburb of Chicago, IL
Posts: 2,614
Send a message via Yahoo to Michelemarie
I' m no expert in the knife department, but I agree with Andy - check out all the knives at a speciality shop - see what feels best in your hand. I prefer a lighter knife, myself - kyrocera.
__________________
Michele Marie
Michelemarie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2006, 12:16 PM   #4
Hospitality Queen
 
jkath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 11,448
Just reiterating what Andy said: go to a shop and put each knife into your hand. You'll know which is best!

(I love my Henckel's set)
__________________
Come visit my foodie blog: www.SockmonkeysKitchen.com
This week's topic: Pinterest and Potatoes
jkath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2006, 03:33 PM   #5
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 5
  1. What you define as "key" knives?
8 in chef's knife
paring knife
santuko
slicer
microplane

2.Why you recommend those knives?
these knives will do pretty much everything you will need on a day to day basis.

3.What brand of knives?
Wusthof! best knife on the market by far. i'm a chef in a restarant and they are all we use. hold an edge longer than any knife i've used with the use of a steel. great warranty! i just sent back my 8 inch classic with a cracked handle and they sent me a new one in less than 2 weeks.
i really like kershaw knifes too. they are a little pricey, but razor sharp.
__________________
pughjr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2006, 03:54 PM   #6
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by pughjr
  1. What you define as "key" knives?
8 in chef's knife
paring knife
santuko
slicer
microplane

2.Why you recommend those knives?
these knives will do pretty much everything you will need on a day to day basis.
I think there is some redundancy here. I would not say that a chefs, santoku, and slicer are all "key" knives. A chefs OR santoku would do as key knives, but no need for both (if we are just talking about key knives). If the chefs or santoku is big enough then the slicer is not needed. yes a slicer will do a better job as it is generally longer (not always though) and thinner than a chefs, but you really dont NEED it to slice meat. A chefs knife would do just fine.

I would like to echo what Andy said above.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2006, 05:40 PM   #7
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 5
"If the chefs or santoku is big enough then the slicer is not needed. yes a slicer will do a better job as it is generally longer (not always though) and thinner than a chefs, but you really dont NEED it to slice meat."

actually, the slicer could be used to correctly slice meat or bread.
you wouldn't use a chef's knife or santuko to slice bread.
__________________
pughjr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2006, 06:04 PM   #8
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by pughjr
actually, the slicer could be used to correctly slice meat or bread.
you wouldn't use a chef's knife or santuko to slice bread.
Which is why for me my key knives would be a chefs knife, paring knife, and serrated bread knife.

I would not use a slicer to slice bread any more than I would use my chefs knife. That is not to say it could not be done, but a serrated knife is the best tool for that job. This is just my opinion though. Each person can find what works for them.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2006, 09:57 PM   #9
Head Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,046
One knife that I use a lot and would have trouble doing without is my Wusthoff 5" boning knife. I use it for boning poultry and other meats, but I use it as a general utility knife too.... it's also the best thing I've found for thin slicing chicken breast halves for making Chicken Picatta, etc.

Otherwise I go along with the consensus.... Chef for slicing,dicing, and chopping, 4" paring for all sorts of good things, and the bread knife...
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2006, 09:27 PM   #10
Senior Cook
 
240brickman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 109
Send a message via AIM to 240brickman Send a message via Yahoo to 240brickman
FWIW:

I would call my "key" knife (at home, anyway) my Henckel 8" chef's knife. There's no single knife, at home OR at work, that I use more often.

I've had it for maybe 12 or 15 years, and it's still just as good as it ever was. Once every 18 months or 2 years, I have it professionally sharpened---there's a guy who owns a small shop (small engine repair, knife sharpening, and taxidermy, I think) about 30 miles away from me. He does a darn fine job, and I've been a loyal customer for ages. And it costs about $15 for him to do all of my knives.

When you find a knife/series that you like, stick with it and look after it. You'll pass it on to your grandchildren.

--J
__________________

__________________
Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work--Aristotle




http://show.imagehosting.us/show/103...75_1037746.jpg
240brickman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.