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View Poll Results: 8" or 10" for 1st Chef's Knife?
8" model 9 52.94%
10" model 8 47.06%
Voters: 17. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-06-2011, 11:48 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Babcock View Post
A lot of the things I cut up with a gyuto (or chef's knife) are large enough that an 8" won't go thru them. Things like squash, heads of cabbage, melons etc are usually a bit too big to cut without sawing or repositioning the product. This is especially true when I'm cutting meat or carving. If you're cutting a rib roast or ribeye steaks (especially if you're using "Ups") then you can't get thru them with one stroke, meaning you have to "saw." This takes more work & time plus leaves marks on the meat. Also things like sheet cakes are too wide to span with an 8" but a 10" will cut them cleanly.

Again, I've already admitted mine is a bias based on cooking professionally. At home it's not a big deal if it takes twice as long to process canteloupe or your rib roast slices have some saw marks. Still I'm used to what I'm used to.
I have both, and I use the 10 inch far more than any other knife in the block.

When cutting through a honeydew or a personal watermelon, usually I use two hands, one on each end of the blade, and a fair amount of pressure. The 8 inch puts my hand too near the sharp point for comfort. Also makes cutting a boneless rib or strip much easier.
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Old 01-06-2011, 12:15 PM   #22
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I'm a big fan of the ten inch chef's knife, probably because it's the first chef's knife that I used (and it's a dandy). Because of the handle shape on my knife, it gives me fine control for delicate work, but will still cut through a large watermelon, or standing rib roast. The key to using your knife successfully depends on your working space, using a proper cutting board that's large enough to handle the food you're working with, and keeping your knife sharp from heel to tip. After that, make sure the handle is comfortable for you, and that there is sufficient clearance between the handle and the cutting board so that you aren't rapping your knuckles with each slice.

Also, learn to hold the knife with a proper pinch grip so that you can control rolling from side to side as you apply pressure with the heel of your hand. Also learn the difference between slicing and chopping. And their are techniques that will allow you to quickly chop foods with your chef's knife, like holding the tip of the knife on the board while lifting the heel high enough to move it across the sliced food before driving it downward through the food, moving it slightly to either side while lifting and chopping down again, until the food is minced, or diced, or whatever.
Watch what the pros do and copy. Or, find a friend who is very good with a knife and have him/her show you a few things.

When you learn to really use your knife, it will become your best friend in the kitchen.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 01-06-2011, 04:17 PM   #23
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I answered 8", without reading your post, and only then read that you are 6'2", go with 10" for sure. You will be much happier. As far as budget I answered in the other thread you probably can almost get both 8 and 10 for $50 if you go with Dexter.
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Old 01-06-2011, 11:26 PM   #24
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A 10" knife would be my choice. I hardly ever use my 8" knife now - but I use a 12" frequently for slaw, melons, etc. etc. My 12" chef's knife, incidentally, is a Victorinox, even though my 10" (and my old 8") are Sabs. I like the handling qualities of the French style chef knife. I moved to a 10" Victorinox from my 8" Sab, but then replaced it with a 10" Sab later. I just find a 10" blade more useful.

You mentioned that you'd be doing some family style recreational cooking. If you have to carve turkeys, roasts and the like, you'd be very much handicapped with an 8" blade unless you had a 10" slicer. Even a big chunk of salmon is tough to negotiate with an 8" blade.

The only downside to a 10" chef's knife is you will need a slightly larger cutting board - but you should have one at least 18" long regardless.
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Old 01-07-2011, 05:12 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Babcock View Post
Well, I'm a pro cook and my views are probably biased towards that but I think a 10" is the better choice. A 10" will do anything the 8" can do but the opposite isn't true.
ditto
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Old 01-07-2011, 07:47 AM   #26
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Thanks for all the input...it is greatly appreciated.

I'm going to go this afternoon (if the snow holds off) to a local place that carries knives (not a cooking specialty store but has some of the brands I'm considering) to get a feel for what might work best for me.

Again, thanks for your guidance.

TripleB
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Old 01-07-2011, 08:51 AM   #27
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I think when you first pick up a 10" knife you'll be a little bit put off by it's size if you're not used to it. At least I was... but once you get used to it you'll love it. Especially with you getting a paring knife, too.
Have fun shopping!
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Old 01-07-2011, 09:25 PM   #28
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I went to a local 'home' store tonight. They had an 8" model but unfortunately they didn't have a 10" chef's knife. To tell you the truth, it didn't seem as large as I thought it was going to. After seeing and holding it, if it were just for me, I'd get the 10". I'm not sure if it makes that much of a difference or not but hold the 8" my largest knuckle (I have big knuckles) went below the blade. But my wife will probably use the knife as well so that makes me think I might should go with the 8"

I guess the votes are like my thinking...no clear winner (currently 5 to 5).

TripleB
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Old 01-07-2011, 10:04 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TripleB View Post
I went to a local 'home' store tonight. They had an 8" model but unfortunately they didn't have a 10" chef's knife. To tell you the truth, it didn't seem as large as I thought it was going to. After seeing and holding it, if it were just for me, I'd get the 10". I'm not sure if it makes that much of a difference or not but hold the 8" my largest knuckle (I have big knuckles) went below the blade. But my wife will probably use the knife as well so that makes me think I might should go with the 8"

I guess the votes are like my thinking...no clear winner (currently 5 to 5).

TripleB
I think the business with your knuckle going below the blade will get more and more annoying as you use the knife for chopping. I know it would drive me bonkers.
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Old 01-07-2011, 10:08 PM   #30
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TripleB, do you grip like this?
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