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View Poll Results: 8" or 10" for 1st Chef's Knife?
8" model 9 52.94%
10" model 8 47.06%
Voters: 17. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-06-2011, 08:07 AM   #1
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8" or 10" for 1st Chef's Knife?

After only cooking a couple items I've already decided that I love to cook. Too bad it too me 43 years to finally try it...thank you Food Network for getting me interested.

Anyway, for my first Chef's knife, should I go with an 8 inch model or a 10 inch model (it will be a Victorinox due to just starting and my budget)?

I'm 6'2" which seems to indicate I should probably go with the 10" model. But right now I'm using a 7", very dull, santoku knife (at least that's what it looks like) and it seems pretty large.

Thanks for all your previous input....it has helped a tremendous amount.

TripleB

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Old 01-06-2011, 08:14 AM   #2
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IMO...An 8 inch.


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Old 01-06-2011, 08:17 AM   #3
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Well, I'm a pro cook and my views are probably biased towards that but I think a 10" is the better choice. A 10" will do anything the 8" can do but the opposite isn't true.
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:21 AM   #4
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I'm not sure how to vote, it depends on what you are using it for. I have both around those sizes and no paring knife. When I am making stuffed jalapeno peppers I grab the smaller one because it is better (for me) for more delicate work. When I am slicing a boneless loin for the freezer, the larger. I had the smaller one first and it wasn't long before I wanted a longer knife. Chopping onions and cubing beef for stew meat I usually grab the larger one. I like the longer slicing motion it gives me.
Hmmm, am I leaning towards the 10"? lol
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:29 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Babcock View Post
Well, I'm a pro cook and my views are probably biased towards that but I think a 10" is the better choice. A 10" will do anything the 8" can do but the opposite isn't true.
Rob I certainly respect your opinions, views, experience, etc...but I'm curious...What can a 10 do that an 8 can't....I have both, but constantly reach for the 8..
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:37 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
Rob I certainly respect your opinions, views, experience, etc...but I'm curious...What can a 10 do that an 8 can't....I have both, but constantly reach for the 8..
A lot of the things I cut up with a gyuto (or chef's knife) are large enough that an 8" won't go thru them. Things like squash, heads of cabbage, melons etc are usually a bit too big to cut without sawing or repositioning the product. This is especially true when I'm cutting meat or carving. If you're cutting a rib roast or ribeye steaks (especially if you're using "Ups") then you can't get thru them with one stroke, meaning you have to "saw." This takes more work & time plus leaves marks on the meat. Also things like sheet cakes are too wide to span with an 8" but a 10" will cut them cleanly.

Again, I've already admitted mine is a bias based on cooking professionally. At home it's not a big deal if it takes twice as long to process canteloupe or your rib roast slices have some saw marks. Still I'm used to what I'm used to.
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:40 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Babcock View Post
A lot of the things I cut up with a gyuto (or chef's knife) are large enough that an 8" won't go thru them. Things like squash, heads of cabbage, melons etc are usually a bit too big to cut without sawing or repositioning the product. This is especially true when I'm cutting meat or carving. If you're cutting a rib roast or ribeye steaks (especially if you're using "Ups") then you can't get thru them with one stroke, meaning you have to "saw." This takes more work & time plus leaves marks on the meat. Also things like sheet cakes are too wide to span with an 8" but a 10" will cut them cleanly.

Again, I've already admitted mine is a bias based on cooking professionally. At home it's not a big deal if it takes twice as long to process canteloupe or your rib roast slices have some saw marks. Still I'm used to what I'm used to.
Exactly.
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:47 AM   #8
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When I started out my first knife was a 10" which I loved. The problem was that my workspace was pretty cramped so having a knife that large was not ideal. When I bought my first J knife I went with an 8ish inch. I am much more comfortable using this one. When I am cutting something big like a squash or melon then I still reach for the 10" otherwise I reach for the 8".

It all comes down to personal preference though. If you are using a 7" that feels large right now then a 10" might feel too large. Go to a store and hold a 10 and an 8 and give a few practice cuts (even if you are just cutting air). Get a feel for it and see which feels better to you.
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:50 AM   #9
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Thanks Rob....I see your point. ~~ As a home cook who mostly chops smaller things like onion/green onion, celery. bell pepper, potatoes, parsley, carrots etc. I feel I have better control with an 8 than the 10....For meats, or large melons I use some old wooden handled slicers/carvers a butcher gave me when he had to get rid of them for Health Department Regulations...The longest one...maybe a 12, I call my Watermelon Knife....One swipe and it's history! ~~ Thanks again for your always informative post!!
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:53 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
It all comes down to personal preference though. If you are using a 7" that feels large right now then a 10" might feel too large. Go to a store and hold a 10 and an 8 and give a few practice cuts (even if you are just cutting air). Get a feel for it and see which feels better to you
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