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Old 01-23-2009, 10:21 PM   #1
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Ceramic Knives

Does anyone use a ceramic knife? I just happened upon them in a catalog and wondered how they compared in terms of sharpness, durability etc.

Now I can see how this could become a heated debate , so let me say up front that there are no right/wrong answers-I'm just soliciting the opinions of the smartest people I know!!

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Old 01-23-2009, 10:36 PM   #2
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I heard and read a great deal about how sharp they are and how long the edge lasts so I bought one - a Kyocera 6" chef's knife.

I used it perhaps a couple of dozen times on vegetables and boneless meats. I was not at all happy with it and put it away. It would not cut into a tomato. My Henckels Pro S knives were sharper.

I may have just gotten a dud but that's my story and I'm sticking to it.
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Old 01-23-2009, 10:43 PM   #3
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Yep-Kyocera was the brand I read about. They made a lot of claims, but I thought I'd check with folks with some "real world" experience. Thanks Andy!
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Old 01-24-2009, 01:18 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I heard and read a great deal about how sharp they are and how long the edge lasts so I bought one - a Kyocera 6" chef's knife.

I used it perhaps a couple of dozen times on vegetables and boneless meats. I was not at all happy with it and put it away. It would not cut into a tomato. My Henckels Pro S knives were sharper.

I may have just gotten a dud but that's my story and I'm sticking to it.
I agree. They hold an edge well but aren't necessarily all that sharp to start with, at least compared to what I'm used to calling sharp.
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Old 01-24-2009, 09:19 AM   #5
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Ceramics cannot be made very sharp even though many users think they are. The hard edges are very brittle and they would chip rapidly. They "can" be sharpened at home, but far less than 1% of us have the equipment to do so and the effort involved is hardly worth it. Beyond that, they are sharp enough for most kitchens, last a long time because of the hardness, and offers of free factory sharpening and other such guarantees and marketing efforts sell some knives. Other good qualities include being stainless and that they are somewhat dishwasher safe.

You'll never find one in my kitchen because the steel in my knives can be made much more sharp, I can bring back an edge any time I want in seconds, I don't have to worry much about them breaking if I drop them, and it's fun to baby them.

There is an excellent compromise distributed by a Swiss company, Kuhn Rikon. They are Chinese made and have a teflon-like nonstick coating which comes in nine different colors. Being a breast cancer survivor, my wife prefers pink. I don't know from which stainless steel the blades are made, but I put a 15 degree per side edge on it and it holds up quite well, at least for my wife's uses. So far they only sell a 3 3/4" paring knife but I think larger knives will soon be available because they really work. They only cost ten bucks and can be found at places like ebay, Amazon, Cutlery and More, and other Internet sources. I've even seen them at the Sur La Table checkout counter.

Buzz
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Old 01-25-2009, 01:58 PM   #6
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Thanks everyone-kind of confirmed my suspicions. I'll stick with the steel!
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Old 02-22-2009, 01:58 AM   #7
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Ceramic knives aren't all that sharp but there are some positive side to using one. Since they are not metal, they don't discolor foods or change the taste. For example I can cut an avocado and it won't change to the dark black color. Same with an apple and some other fruits. Bad part is that they shatter. You can just cut with the knife. Twist it a little while cutting or try to like pry the core of an fruit an you have a great change or breaking or chipping it.
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Old 02-22-2009, 09:07 AM   #8
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Apples and avocados do not get brown because of the interaction with the metal. They change color because of the interaction with the air.
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Old 02-22-2009, 11:44 AM   #9
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Really? I was always thinking it was from the metal. Or is it from certain types or metals. Say a stainless steel knife compared to a carbon steel one. I've tried cutting an avocado with either knife... ceramic and metal and then wrapping it with plastic wrap. The one cut with ceramic stayed fresh longer. The other one just starts getting black/brownish spots way faster than the other one. It's like one day compared to a couple days.
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Old 02-22-2009, 11:53 AM   #10
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Carbon steel will discolor food, but stainless will not.
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