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Old 11-14-2009, 04:38 PM   #1
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Custom Kitchen Knife

hi all! new here, was hoping to get some feedback on folks with a passion for cooking.
this is a custom order I recently finished and it got me to thinking about making sets as I enjoyed the divergence from hunters and bowies and camp knives.
the knife is 1095 H.C. steel, differentially heat treated and tempered back to a blue instead of the usual bronze,
over all length is 15 1/2 inches with the blade at 9 inches in length. at its widest part it is 1 3/4 inches wide. it is 3/16s thick at the spine and has a convex edge geometry.
handle material is stabilized Bubinga wood pinned with brass with the bolster being nickel silver also pinned in brass. also some copper spacers betwixt the bolster and scales for that added bling



so what do you all think? Im thinking about doing a full chef's set and bringing it to my local culinary supply store on consignment, the set will likely be in the 1500-2k range. whats everyone's thoughts? there a market for custom made hand forged kitchen sets?
thanks for looking and any feedback!
Shane

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Old 11-14-2009, 07:59 PM   #2
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That's absolutely gorgeous! Having said that, though, I would have to feel the knife in my hands before I decided whether I liked it -- especially for $2k. I wonder if maybe you can use it more for advertising made-to-order custom work. I could see something being made exactly the way I like it being worth that much, especially with that level of craftsmanship.
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Old 11-14-2009, 08:04 PM   #3
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thank you Erik, just so you know though the 2k was for a set likely of 5 or 6 pieces
that particular knife was ordered at 350
I'm just wondering if there's a realistic market for a 2k set of knives being fairly ignorant of that particular niche.
speaking of my ignorance, what would you folks look for in a set of 6 knives, style lengths etc?
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Old 11-15-2009, 08:33 AM   #4
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CPM S30V, flat ground, heavy stick tang with interchangeable handle configurations and heavy butt( pommel) & hilt (front bolster) to keep knife tip off counter. Fit and finish (no food collecting gaps) more important than file work. Individual pieces more likely to be more salable than sets until rep is established.
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Old 11-15-2009, 09:08 AM   #5
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thanks bill :) hrm take-down handle...I like it!
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Old 11-15-2009, 10:04 AM   #6
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it does have the advantage for customary pinch grip users - certainly will remove those pesky chef's callous . . .
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Old 11-15-2009, 10:47 AM   #7
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dilbert explain please?
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Old 11-15-2009, 12:57 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by metalbender View Post
dilbert explain please?
the typical pinch grip on a knife involves contact of the interior forefinger on the spine of the knife - leading to what is affectionately called chef's callous.

the design pictured would obviously shred the user's finger.

nice knife, regrets I would never consider it based on the overall geometry - especially the thin handle profile and the distance from the bolster to the cutting edge heel.
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Old 11-15-2009, 01:04 PM   #9
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are you referring to the filework ie ivy carving? thanks for that tidbit as it will help me with future designs, as will the bolster comment. although why is the bolster to heel distance an issue?
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Old 11-15-2009, 02:25 PM   #10
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[not trying to be a smarta** here, but . . .]

I take it you do not use the knives you make?
especially in the area of "cooking"?

this link shows how a lot of people hold a chef's knife.
How to Use A Chef's Knife - Proper Chef's Knife Technique - Learn Correct Knife Grip

the prongs&dongs on the spine -unique element, masterfully executed - is a polar opposite of "usable" in the real world.

the handle is too thin - examine which fingers are on the handle in the 'grip' photos - difficult to steer a knife with half a little pinky finger trying to get a grip.

>>although why is the bolster to heel distance an issue?
I don't know Point A to Point B as you are measuring for 9 inches - however
about half the knife is flat, the forward half goes into that big fat belly.
there is a knifing technique called "rock & chop" - you should google that one.

check the geometry of the knife - especially how high you need to raise the back of the handle - to rock & chop a 4 inch diameter onion - combine that with the rather limited useful length of the blade flat.

it's a very nice looking knife - but the basic design parameters / geometry are not well suited to kitchen tasks.
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Old 11-15-2009, 02:36 PM   #11
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this particular knife was made to specs at the request of a customer. I normally make camping/hunting knives. your feedback truly has been most helpful dillbert and thank you VERY much for that link. see what you mean about the filework shredding a finger now.
also the profile with a gradual taper instead of a belly. gotcha :) beginning understand better whats needed/looked for. once again ty very much your offering the EXACT sort of feedback I was looking for.
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Old 11-15-2009, 03:10 PM   #12
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>>exactly . . .

oh dear. please don't hold me to that [g]

anyway - "bend on" as they say - you'll need to find something that sets your knife apart from "the rest"

the 'geometry' thing we covered a bit - creating a knife that is "more bold" or "more graceful" is a wonderful theory - but physics / geometry is not modified by "artful content" - and if the geometry makes it a PITA to use, not likely to get a lot of Twitter votes.

I'd suggest working on a good grip-able handle and reworking the belly radius.

the spattered flattened texture of the blade surface is not common - that could be your selling point - certainly a challenge to all the "we've got kullens" folk - looks to be as effective, if not more effective, than a boringly static dimple grind.....
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Old 11-15-2009, 03:46 PM   #13
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Metalbender, I have a question completely off topick.

I was thinking about making a hunting knife, more for display rather than actual use,. but when I looked into getting material I was quoted a $200 for just a piece of material enough for only one knife. I cansel my knife making idea right away. For $200 bucks I'd rather buy a knife. So my question is, where do you buy yor material, hom much it is on avarage? Also do you do your own heattreating or not?
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Old 11-15-2009, 03:54 PM   #14
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hiya charlie, Im assuming at 200 you were looking at damascus billets, either that or someone with low moral standards was trying to pull a fast one heh
I do indeed do my own heat treatment, Im a bladesmith, ie I work in a coal forge and use hammer anvil files and stones to achieve my profiles.
as far as stock I recommend Jantz supplies, as far as steels, for a hunting knife as a new knife maker you cant go wrong with 01 or 1095.
buy yourself a 18" x 1/4 bar for 15 bucks and have at it hoss ;)
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Old 11-15-2009, 05:16 PM   #15
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Thank you for the fast respond. I wasn't looking for anything fancy. Called local metal supplier. I'm they qoted me something simple. As a matter of fact I think I did ask for O1. Let me ask you do you hapen tohave a phone numbr for Jantz, and where are they located?
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Old 11-15-2009, 07:07 PM   #16
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google! their huge online
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Old 11-15-2009, 07:50 PM   #17
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Thanks
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Old 01-03-2010, 11:01 PM   #18
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Custom knife tips

Hello everyone, I am new to discuss cooking but am enjoying the posts and the participation. With respect to that specific knife in question. I must agree with Dilbert and Just plain bill here. That knife in particular does not quite meet with your typical requirements. I also make knives as a hobby for myself and friends now n then I am an amateur cook but a professional industrial engineer. I really like the idea that Just plain bill came up with (smart idea) as well, the steel choices I like along with CPM 530V is CPM 154 and of course VG10. You can also go nuts and try to get some Cowry or ZDP 182.. If you want to get some idea of what Inspired me and some of my designs is Haslingers knives.I have uploaded one of his knives using a G10 handle. They are very well designed simple and elegant well priced too! I hope this tid bit helps in some way.
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Old 01-03-2010, 11:06 PM   #19
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photo of Haslinger

Hello everyone I tried to upload a jpg. Obviously did not work. I am going to try again.
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Old 01-08-2010, 12:10 AM   #20
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I think the ivy pattern should stop at the bolster, not extend into the spine - The design inside the handles is just awesome, however a cook wouldn't be comfortable using it with the ivy pattern where their fingers are resting over the spine. Don't know how the narrow handle at the bolster would feel - I have small hands, so it may even be the next greatest thing in handle geometry, but keep the ivy pattern inside the back-strap (encased within the handles) for sure! Nice work!
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