"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Knives
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-12-2018, 01:15 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
seans_potato_business's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Edinburgh, Scotland
Posts: 261
Cut-resistant gloves for my clumsy arthritic mother

My mother is arthritic and not very good using a knife such that she is more likely than ordinary to cut herself. She currently avoids using a knife but thinks a cut-resistant glove would change that. I was wondering what kind of cut-resistant glove might be the least hassle to use and maintain. As well as chainmail, I see that there are also ones made of wire ("microplane"?) which seem be more form-fitting than chainmail.

Can they be put into a washing machine or maybe they should just be worn and brushed with a washing up brush?

Getting the glove on and off might also be a consideration (chainmail looks like it might be a little easier simply because they're a looser fit).

I'm guessing that the chainmail resist a cut better than the wire gloves but I'm not sure that matters unless you're swinging a meat cleaver?

__________________

__________________
We don't inherit the Earth from our parents; we borrow it from our children.
seans_potato_business is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2018, 01:28 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 23,632
I use a Kevlar glove like this. It can be washed in the laundry and it's pretty easy to put on. It's nice and snug.
Click image for larger version

Name:	5c8c46453244e6f46a1a1ffb3592498f.jpg
Views:	75
Size:	95.6 KB
ID:	28890
__________________

__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2018, 01:45 PM   #3
Executive Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,858
I have THESE from Amazon. Pick the size you need. I bought them mostly to use with my mandoline, but they are good when grating with my Microplane too. They should do the trick quite well for your mother. And yes, they can be just tossed in the washing machine.

__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2018, 02:46 PM   #4
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: New Hampshire Seacoast
Posts: 2,510
I have the NoCry gloves as well. They are a lot more flexible than you would think. By the way, don't test them while wearing them like the picture shows. Stick a carrot or something inside to simulate a finger.
tenspeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2018, 04:36 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 14,016
I like the ones pictured too. I'd think she will be using them daily. They can be washed with soap while wearing them, then rinsed and hung to dry, rather than waiting for a load of laundry.
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2018, 06:06 PM   #6
Executive Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,858
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
I like the ones pictured too. I'd think she will be using them daily. They can be washed with soap while wearing them, then rinsed and hung to dry, rather than waiting for a load of laundry.
I usually wash them after using them in clean dishwater, then rinse and put on the dish rack to dry.
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2018, 11:32 PM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 21,539
Geez louise!
Clumsy and arthritic?
Does she call you her son who can barely manage a spud here and there?

Umm, go with the kevlar.
__________________
The past is gone it's all been said.
So here's to what the future brings,
I know tomorrow you'll find better things
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2018, 01:35 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 14,016
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
I usually wash them after using them in clean dishwater, then rinse and put on the dish rack to dry.
Good idea also Rick, and for those who use their dishwasher daily, there's that option too. At any rate, meat contamination needs to be dealt with carefully. Hand washing the gloves and then microwaving them will work.
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2018, 02:10 PM   #9
Executive Chef
 
medtran49's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 4,176
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
Geez louise!
Clumsy and arthritic?
Does she call you her son who can barely manage a spud here and there?

Umm, go with the kevlar.

Thank you. As someone who is having a long flare of arthritis in her hands, which includes dropping things, not being able to hold things correctly, etc., I certainly wouldn't appreciate being called clumsy.
medtran49 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2018, 11:44 PM   #10
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3,671
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
Geez louise!
Clumsy and arthritic?
Does she call you her son who can barely manage a spud here and there?

Umm, go with the kevlar.
Well, statistically, 6-9% of the population in any one generation, is covertly critical or overtly critical. The following generation picks this up as the example of 'normal'. Then that generation becomes as overtly or covertly critical towards their children and back at their parents. So parents teach this new 'normal' to their children, even if it is abuse, emotional abuse. At some point the parental generation or the the child-adult generation tosses those relationships off and they become estranged. Statistically 19% of children-adults and parents become estranged.

If, IF, those original parents TAUGHT (because they could and they understood their pain) their children, through EXAMPLE, that when you are in pain, you own your pain, and you shouldn't inflict it on someone else, THEN the next generation would learn a better way to handle their feelings. The problem is the original parents never learned to handle pain appropriately because their parents a generation above them, as well, didn't learn or teach it either.

If you are in the 94% to 91% of average families, that's great, but there are still people that weren't treated kindly. Help them find their way into the mainstream without the emotional abuse. It's not your job to do this, it is just human kindness.
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2018, 11:54 PM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 21,539
Yes, I might be wrong.

She might actually be both clumsy and simultaneously arthritic, which the latter would simply exacerbate the former.

I apologize.

You still should never call your mother clumsy, no matter what. You're here because she managed it somehow.
__________________
The past is gone it's all been said.
So here's to what the future brings,
I know tomorrow you'll find better things
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2018, 01:12 AM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 14,016
Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
Well, statistically, 6-9% of the population in any one generation, is covertly critical or overtly critical. The following generation picks this up as the example of 'normal'. Then that generation becomes as overtly or covertly critical towards their children and back at their parents. So parents teach this new 'normal' to their children, even if it is abuse, emotional abuse. At some point the parental generation or the the child-adult generation tosses those relationships off and they become estranged. Statistically 19% of children-adults and parents become estranged.

If, IF, those original parents TAUGHT (because they could and they understood their pain) their children, through EXAMPLE, that when you are in pain, you own your pain, and you shouldn't inflict it on someone else, THEN the next generation would learn a better way to handle their feelings. The problem is the original parents never learned to handle pain appropriately because their parents a generation above them, as well, didn't learn or teach it either.

If you are in the 94% to 91% of average families, that's great, but there are still people that weren't treated kindly. Help them find their way into the mainstream without the emotional abuse. It's not your job to do this, it is just human kindness.
Huh? Maybe it's just me, but I don't understand just what all that means, or what's the point.
On the other hand, I sure understand Bucky's defense of SPB's mother and there's no call for an apology from him.
Just my 2 cents.
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2018, 06:23 AM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 21,539
It's no big deal. I wasn't really scolding Sean of the spuds. I may have come across too harsh.

Funny it is, though, about telling people how they are or not allowed to express themselves by telling them how it's ok or not to express themselves.

Nonetheless, go with the kevlar. Both proverbial and literal.
__________________
The past is gone it's all been said.
So here's to what the future brings,
I know tomorrow you'll find better things
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2018, 07:40 AM   #14
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: New Hampshire Seacoast
Posts: 2,510
I think that if sean shows his love for his mother by gifting her with kevlar gloves all will be forgiven.
tenspeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2018, 09:47 AM   #15
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 21,539
Lol, yes. Maybe I should send them.
__________________
The past is gone it's all been said.
So here's to what the future brings,
I know tomorrow you'll find better things
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2018, 05:32 PM   #16
Head Chef
 
Josie1945's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Sunny Central Florida
Posts: 2,296
BuckyTom I agree with Kayelle, don't apologise.
I agree never call you mother clumsy.

Josie

Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
It's no big deal. I wasn't really scolding Sean of the spuds. I may have come across too harsh.

Funny it is, though, about telling people how they are or not allowed to express themselves by telling them how it's ok or not to express themselves.

Nonetheless, go with the kevlar. Both proverbial and literal.
__________________
Practice Random Acts of Kindness ( RAK ) Makes you feel great too
Josie1945 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2018, 07:58 PM   #17
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3,671
I wasn't scolding Tom. I was asking everyone that was taken back by the word clumsy to understand where this kind of insult comes from, as Buckytom asked: "Does she call you her son who can barely manage a spud here and there? ", yes, she probably does--that was the point--this insult probably came down from mother to son.

There are other words to use to say someone is clumsy without the negative connotation. "mom who drops onions sometimes", or "uncoordinated", there are words that mean the same things without it being an insult. We could all try to be a little more diplomatic.
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2018, 08:57 PM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 21,539
Ok, now you lost me, bliss. Clumsy ain't nothing but an insult, no matter how you look at it.

But yes, as you noticed, maybe Sean of the spuds mom was in turn insulting, hence his rough edged comment about the woman in his life with a brow that is furrowed and wrinkled with care.

And Sean's not a bad guy, to care enough to protect her fingers, so toil worn for he...
__________________
The past is gone it's all been said.
So here's to what the future brings,
I know tomorrow you'll find better things
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2018, 09:00 PM   #19
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 22,114
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
And here I thought she had gotten clumsy because of the arthritis.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2018, 09:06 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 21,539
Yes, maybe, or no, maybe.

We're waiting on that kid she raised who cares more for tubers than his poor mother.

He's probably out chasing lassies with a pint in one hand, and a smoke in the other...
__________________

__________________
The past is gone it's all been said.
So here's to what the future brings,
I know tomorrow you'll find better things
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
other

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
×