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Old 01-12-2018, 12:15 PM   #1
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Cut-resistant gloves for my clumsy arthritic mother

My mother is arthritic and not very good using a knife such that she is more likely than ordinary to cut herself. She currently avoids using a knife but thinks a cut-resistant glove would change that. I was wondering what kind of cut-resistant glove might be the least hassle to use and maintain. As well as chainmail, I see that there are also ones made of wire ("microplane"?) which seem be more form-fitting than chainmail.

Can they be put into a washing machine or maybe they should just be worn and brushed with a washing up brush?

Getting the glove on and off might also be a consideration (chainmail looks like it might be a little easier simply because they're a looser fit).

I'm guessing that the chainmail resist a cut better than the wire gloves but I'm not sure that matters unless you're swinging a meat cleaver?

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Old 01-12-2018, 12:28 PM   #2
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I use a Kevlar glove like this. It can be washed in the laundry and it's pretty easy to put on. It's nice and snug.
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Old 01-12-2018, 12:45 PM   #3
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I have THESE from Amazon. Pick the size you need. I bought them mostly to use with my mandoline, but they are good when grating with my Microplane too. They should do the trick quite well for your mother. And yes, they can be just tossed in the washing machine.

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Old 01-12-2018, 01:46 PM   #4
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I have the NoCry gloves as well. They are a lot more flexible than you would think. By the way, don't test them while wearing them like the picture shows. Stick a carrot or something inside to simulate a finger.
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Old 01-12-2018, 03:36 PM   #5
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I like the ones pictured too. I'd think she will be using them daily. They can be washed with soap while wearing them, then rinsed and hung to dry, rather than waiting for a load of laundry.
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Old 01-12-2018, 05:06 PM   #6
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I like the ones pictured too. I'd think she will be using them daily. They can be washed with soap while wearing them, then rinsed and hung to dry, rather than waiting for a load of laundry.
I usually wash them after using them in clean dishwater, then rinse and put on the dish rack to dry.
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Old 01-12-2018, 10:32 PM   #7
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Geez louise!
Clumsy and arthritic?
Does she call you her son who can barely manage a spud here and there?

Umm, go with the kevlar.
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Old 01-13-2018, 12:35 PM   #8
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I usually wash them after using them in clean dishwater, then rinse and put on the dish rack to dry.
Good idea also Rick, and for those who use their dishwasher daily, there's that option too. At any rate, meat contamination needs to be dealt with carefully. Hand washing the gloves and then microwaving them will work.
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Old 01-13-2018, 01:10 PM   #9
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Geez louise!
Clumsy and arthritic?
Does she call you her son who can barely manage a spud here and there?

Umm, go with the kevlar.

Thank you. As someone who is having a long flare of arthritis in her hands, which includes dropping things, not being able to hold things correctly, etc., I certainly wouldn't appreciate being called clumsy.
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Old 01-13-2018, 10:44 PM   #10
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Geez louise!
Clumsy and arthritic?
Does she call you her son who can barely manage a spud here and there?

Umm, go with the kevlar.
Well, statistically, 6-9% of the population in any one generation, is covertly critical or overtly critical. The following generation picks this up as the example of 'normal'. Then that generation becomes as overtly or covertly critical towards their children and back at their parents. So parents teach this new 'normal' to their children, even if it is abuse, emotional abuse. At some point the parental generation or the the child-adult generation tosses those relationships off and they become estranged. Statistically 19% of children-adults and parents become estranged.

If, IF, those original parents TAUGHT (because they could and they understood their pain) their children, through EXAMPLE, that when you are in pain, you own your pain, and you shouldn't inflict it on someone else, THEN the next generation would learn a better way to handle their feelings. The problem is the original parents never learned to handle pain appropriately because their parents a generation above them, as well, didn't learn or teach it either.

If you are in the 94% to 91% of average families, that's great, but there are still people that weren't treated kindly. Help them find their way into the mainstream without the emotional abuse. It's not your job to do this, it is just human kindness.
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