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Old 08-04-2005, 05:06 PM   #1
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Difference Between Cutting Boards?

Besides material, are there any other differences? I mean, does a maple cutting board make the knife slide smoother vs a tempered glass cutting board? Are tempered glass cutting boards any good? Will they dull the knifes? Sorry for so many questions. I'm about to get married, and am buying my kitchen stuff slowly, but I do want quality. Thank you.

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Old 08-04-2005, 05:12 PM   #2
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Stay away from glass cutting boards. They are too harsh on your knife. Stick with wood or plastic. Both have their positives and negatives and you will find as many people who tell you wood is better than plastic as you will find the other way around. I love the look and feel of wood boards, but I like being able to put my plastic boards in the dishwasher.
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Old 08-04-2005, 05:24 PM   #3
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Glass cutting boards are best wehn painted by someone who can make it pretty, and then hung in a permanent place on the wall. The glass is hard on the knife's cutting edge and is subject to breakage. Even though it's tempered, it's still made of glass.

Food for thought; plastic cutting boards are hygienic when new, as they're not porous like wood. But over time, they develop grooves that can harbor bacterial. At that point, they need to be washed with energy and bleach. They are no easier to sanitize than is wood.

Wood has a couple of things going for it. It's tough, relatively easy on knife edges, has natural anti-biotic properties, and when cared for properly, is as easy to clean as most other materials.

If you by a wooden cutting board, it's best to by one made with butcher-block constrution, and look for those that have the end-grain as the cutting surface. Make sure to season the wood with food-grade mineral oil. This helps prevent micro-organizms from entering the wood pores, as well as blocking staining liquids and water. Wash with hot, soapy water after every use, and re-apply the minera oil.

There is a new wooden player around right now. Bamboo cutting boards are lighter than traditional maple or oak boards, and are very tough and resilient. How easy they are on knife edges is beyond my experience as I have never used one. But I know they're out there.

And remember, most wooden cutting boards are laminated. The cheap ones are made with cheaper glues and will come apart if not treated with care. You may see the boards warp, or start to split at the joints. So take care to purchase the best you can afford, even if you need to save up. In our society, we have lost the virtue of patience. It costs us heavy penalties in our finances, and in out quality of life. So purchase wisely, without going into debt for the things you want. Debt is a very heavy burden, and one that's very hard to get out from under.

Hope all of this helps.

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Old 08-04-2005, 05:43 PM   #4
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I have found it when I was already searching about hygiene of plastics and woods.... Woods are better and Glass one is quite destructive for knives...

http://www.peter.hemsley.btinternet..../bacteria.html
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Old 08-04-2005, 06:11 PM   #5
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I go with plastic: plastic is cheaper and when it wears and gets groves that can harbor bateria, I throw it away and buy a new one. Wood is wonderful, and the best of the best when it comes to being a cutting board, but they are expensive, and need to be maintained with a wipe of food grade mineral oil and NEVER soaked or put in the dishwasher.
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Old 08-04-2005, 06:41 PM   #6
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I love my plastic ones. Use them, throw them in the dishwasher and if they are too old throw away and start over with a new one. I also like them because you can pick them up and carry them to the stove or sink easier AND because they bend making it easier to slide items that you've cut into the bowl or pan.
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Old 08-05-2005, 12:14 AM   #7
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Thank you so much. I will have to explain that to my finacee, cuz she bought me this really nice tempered glass one. It has a chef w/wine bottles! HA! Thanx again!
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Old 08-05-2005, 02:37 PM   #8
 
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Best wishes for the young bride!

Forget glass -- period

I have two boards, one plastic for meat, the other a nice end-grain block for everything else.

Meat is a real potential contamination hazard. I use a plastic board and scrub it after use -- soap and water, lots of scrubbing. If I'm really slicing and dicing the meat on the plastic board, I'll go for a bit of chlorine bleach on the board for bacteria control. They're cheap. When I get grooves in it, it gets replaced. I put the old ones in the shop for a cutting surface for tools.

It's worth noting here:

The HIGHEST bacterial contamination area in the kitchen is the cutting board! The dishrag is second.

Wash out the dish rag -- often, daily.

But the cutting board contamination goes WAY DOWN when you segregate meats from everything else. Plastic board for meat. Wood board for everything else. Still --- soap, water, scrub. Veggie oil on wood boards cuts down on bacteria. But nothing beats soap, water, and a good scrub.


Wood, end grain. I see a few of these boards where the laminations have swelled. Cracks develop. Check the board for knots in the wood.

End grain is the way you want the wood facing to cut on it. End grain reisists cuts and grooves better than the side grain laminations.

I've seen some bamboo laminated boards. They seem tough and durable. Comments ???

Cutting boards are Kitchen goods that get used and replaced. A good end grain wood board when used for everything EXCEPT meat will last years and years.

Plastic board for meats will last a couple years with some care.

Find a nice end-grain laminate board and plunk down some $$$ -- then . . . keep the meat off it! It will last and last. And you'll be glad you spent the money.
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Old 08-05-2005, 03:37 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daphne duLibre

Wash out the dish rag -- often, daily.
Hear hear! And never use a sponge. Just a fresh dish rag daily.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daphne duLibre
Veggie oil on wood boards cuts down on bacteria.
Didn't I read somewhere that you are supposed to use mineral oil instead of veggie oil? I thought I read that veggie oil could go rancid?

I'd be interested in reading what you all have to say on that topic. Perhaps it could be a new thread though. I don't want to hijack this one, just wanted to express my interest.
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Old 08-05-2005, 07:18 PM   #10
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Do not use vegetable oil on cutting boards. It can go rancid, it can harbor bacteria and it is bad for the wood. Use a food grade mineral oil, the kind you buy in the laxative section of the pharmacy does a good job. It keeps the wood from drying out, protects it from absorbing oils and moisture from the foods and helps prevent staining. It should be done every couple of week on a well used board. If you don't use the board very often, every couple of months should be fine. Using Vegetable oil can weaken the wood grain and the glues that hold the boards together.
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