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Old 11-06-2006, 08:19 AM   #41
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I like the half-bolster Cordon Bleu Wusthof knives. $90-$100 gets you an 8" Chef Knife and a 3.5" Paring Knife. That pair handles about 99% of my chopping/slicing. I keep an extra set as a backup, and the only other knives I have are a set of four Wusthof steak knives and a cheapo stamped/serrated bread knife.
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Old 11-06-2006, 10:47 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz
LamsonSharp 8" Chef. Lifetime factory sharpening.
Which is great, if you happen to live next door to the factory.
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Old 11-06-2006, 10:52 AM   #43
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I cant say I have a favorite brand of knife, but there was one time at work and gave this French Knife a 2 minute sharpening, and it worked so beautifly. It lasted my whole 10 hour shift that day, it sliced through a frozen beef pot roast like it was nothing.
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Old 11-06-2006, 11:48 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caine
Which is great, if you happen to live next door to the factory.
I think you're mistaken. You send them as many knives as you want, and include a $10 check to pay for repackaging and postage to be returned. There is even a form on their site that you can print.
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Old 11-06-2006, 12:59 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz
I think you're mistaken. You send them as many knives as you want, and include a $10 check to pay for repackaging and postage to be returned. There is even a form on their site that you can print.
But, once you've sent them all your knives to be sharpened, you'll be eating out until they send them all back.
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Old 11-06-2006, 01:07 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caine
But, once you've sent them all your knives to be sharpened, you'll be eating out until they send them all back.

Why not just use your back up knife set??
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Old 11-06-2006, 03:00 PM   #47
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The point I was trying to make is this: Most people do not know how to or have the means of properly sharpening their knives. I do know what Lamson Sharp offers and wanted to let other people know what is available to them. I have been in many 'a kitchens to find dull, unsafe cutlery.
Personally, I sharpen mine with 1600-2200 grit Japanese water stones. If someone was going to invest money into a very good set of knives (or just one for that matter), using a cheap over the counter sharpener would most likely ruin it.
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Old 11-06-2006, 03:21 PM   #48
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Several years ago I realized that I needed to replace my old paring knife. I'd had it for about 30 years and it had been sharpened so many times it was the width of a large needle. Not really. But it was ready to be retired.

I don't know why, but I purchased two knives - a paring knife and a santoku-type knife, on eBay. They were inexpensive, very inexpensive, and were made by a company called Rada. I'd never heard of Rada, but the knives were the right price and seemed like they would be perfect for my purpose.

Wow! These two knives hardly get a chance to rest. They feel good in my hand and hold an edge like nobody's business. And, they're easy to sharpen. They out-perform most of my high-end knives.

I did a little research and learned that the Rada folks have been around since 1948 and have a lifetime warranty on their products.
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Old 11-06-2006, 03:52 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz
I think you're mistaken. You send them as many knives as you want, and include a $10 check to pay for repackaging and postage to be returned. There is even a form on their site that you can print.
Think about this.

The local Ace Hardware charges $1.50 per knife to sharpen, usually while you wait, on a $1000.00 TruHone professional sharpener.

You send them $10.00 for return shipping and it costs you at least $5.00 to send the knives to them.

I'm just saying.

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Old 11-06-2006, 05:33 PM   #50
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I've had great success keeping my knives razor sharp with a Smith's Arkansas stone and a 20 year-old Chicago Cutlery steel. The steel works so well that when one of my family (and no one ever 'fessed up ) dropped the steel and split the handle, I epoxied it all back together. It isn't as pretty as it used to be, but it still works beautifully and it very sturdy.

The steeling method I use usually suffices to keep the edges sharp. I heard it on a PBS radio program. I use about a 30 to 40 degree angle and stroke edge forward on the five times on each side, then four times, three, two, and one last stroke. I use light pressure, barely enough to hold the edge to the metal. It works amazingly well. I've taken what appeared to be a dull knife, steeled it with this method, and was amazed that it was very sharp again.

The only time I use the wet-stone is when steeling the knife edge doesn't bring it back. And then about 5 minutes of my time suffices to give me the edge I'm looking for.

If I wan't a very smooth adn sharp edge, like for slicing through delicate meats, I will get the edge very sharp with the Smith's stone, and follow it with my Crock Stick.

One of these days, I'm going to make a strop and see how that works. Also, a convex edge is far more sturdy and resists folding over better than either a convex, V, or chissel edge. The outside curve is far stronger than the other shapes. It also goes through most foods easier as well. The convex shaped (hollo-ground) edge is the weakest and the most difficult to push through hard foods such as winter squashes, mellons, etc.

I have a dremmel tool, and coarser stones if I'm starting with an extremely dull blade. But I've only used them for sharpening my lawn mower, a hatchet, my splitting maul, or an axe.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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