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Old 10-16-2007, 09:01 AM   #11
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Wood countertop salvaged from a science lab demolition, custom cut to fit a corner of my countertop.

Wood is a good material choice for not dulling the blade of your knife, but I prefer other materials when cutting raw meat.
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Old 10-16-2007, 11:54 AM   #12
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You can try and find some sections of bowling alley too.
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Old 10-21-2007, 03:51 PM   #13
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I have a bamboo cutting board and a larger plastic cutting board. I prefer wood cutting boards to anything synthetic. When I get my prep table/island, I'm going to use a large wood cutting board on it.
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Old 10-21-2007, 10:41 PM   #14
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I love my wood board and have wondered why anyone would use glass or marble boards. My grandmother uses marble and I always hate to use it with any knife worth anything. I can feel the knife dulling with every chop!. I wish we could use wood in the restaurant's kitchen, but apparently that is against health code.
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Old 10-22-2007, 12:13 AM   #15
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Could someone kindly enlighten me as to what "end grain" means, exactly? And why it is generally so much more 'spensive than other kinds of wooden cutting boards?

Thanks! :)
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Old 10-22-2007, 12:46 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW View Post
My main board is a John Boos hard maple edge grain 24 x 18 x 2-1/4 inches and is reversable. I also have a plastic board that is around 18 x 12 x 1/2 inch that I use for wet things, or things that will stain, because it's easier to get it over the sink to clean.
I have the same John Boos!!!

Gotta love it!
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Old 10-22-2007, 01:01 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Indigo_Swale View Post
Could someone kindly enlighten me as to what "end grain" means, exactly? And why it is generally so much more 'spensive than other kinds of wooden cutting boards?

Thanks! :)
Think of it this way...if you have a 2x4 board, you would use the end of the wood as the cutting surface. These types of boards require many more, smaller pieces of wood to assemble, which drives the price up.
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Old 10-22-2007, 01:15 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indigo_Swale View Post
Could someone kindly enlighten me as to what "end grain" means, exactly? And why it is generally so much more 'spensive than other kinds of wooden cutting boards?

Thanks! :)

Think of a 2x4. If you look at the end, which is 2"x4" (approx) that's the end grain. Cut off 10 slices two inches thick and stand them on end and glue them together. The 20"x40" (approx) board will be made up of end grain.

It's much kinder to your knives.
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Old 10-22-2007, 01:38 PM   #19
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I have a large wooden board with a moat that lives on my peninsula (island that sticks out from a wall). I sometimes use the flexible plastic mats for veggies and fish because the wooden board is so heavy, but I always use the wood one for meats and poultry, because it's more sanitary than glass or plastic. Even after being put through the dishwasher, plastic boards harbor microbes: On the Chopping Block, Alaska Science Forum

I've heard that marble boards are good for baking - since they are always cool to the touch, they keep the ingredients cooler, which is important in baking.

I also have a small marble board for holiday cheese trays, etc., and a small wooden board and one that came with my knives, for cutting small items quickly. I only keep a small plastic board for when I have guests and someone wants to help out - I give them veggies to chop on it.
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Old 10-22-2007, 01:38 PM   #20
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The best way I ever heard it described was like this.

Take a handful of dry spaghetti. Hold it in your fist. The spaghetti should be going up and down. Picture a knife going down through the spaghetti. It slips between the strands instead of actually cutting them. The is what end grain wood is like and why it is more gentle on your blade. The knife actually slides between the wood fibers.
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