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Old 04-25-2006, 08:54 PM   #1
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Help Me Pick Some Equipment

Ok, my birthday is going to be here in 2-3 weeks, and im going to ask for some cooking untensil's as a gift. Are there any cheap/very good knifes, for dicing, peeling, meat, veggies, potatoes, etc. Very good ones, but affordable. And can someone point me in the direction of a nice cheap broiler/wok.

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Old 04-25-2006, 09:36 PM   #2
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cheap and good don't usually go together, but you can get a calphalon chef knife/santuko knife set ... 8" and 5" respectively, decent steel, balance, etc, for under $50 from Cooking.com

carbon steel woks are not expensive

what do you mean by broiler? roasting pan?
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Old 04-25-2006, 11:55 PM   #3
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Part of the problem in trying to recommend knives is what you mean by "affordable". If your family can afford to buy you a $500 set of knives I would certainly change what I would suggest over if they could only afford $60 max. Please define what you mean by "affordable" .... then we can make some suggestions about the best you can find within that budget.

As Robo said - the best woks are carbon-steel, they are not expensive - an Asian store will have the best price. You might want to check out the discussions about woks in the Cookware and Accessories Forum. Sometimes there is just no reason to reinvent the wheel ... Kasma Loha-unchit says everything I could in Wok: Use and Care and Wok: Flat or Round Bottom and Wok: Seasoning and Care.

A Broiler and Wok are two totally different things. Broiling means the food is heated from the top - a wok heats the food from the bottom.
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Old 04-26-2006, 01:45 AM   #4
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Hi CS, just a home cook here, but I concur, very good and cheap do not usually go hand in hand.

Sometimes it is cheaper in the long run to get something a bit more pricey than to keep buying replacements.

But you can get some decent knives fairly inexpensively. We have sort of a collection we put together over the years. Never purchased a very good/expensive one. (Wait a minute, I have a birthday coming up pretty soon, hmmm, I have always wanted a good one).

I find the one(s) I use the most, OK, read that almost always, is a chef knife.

The one I use the most has a blade of about 6".

As important as the knife, you have to know how to keep it sharp.

You can Google for instructions. A sharp inexpensive knife works a heck of a lot better than a very expensive, but very dull one.

(Generally the more expensive ones hold their edges longer).

If I could have only one knife it would be a chef knife.

Then a paring knife. And then, you mention peeling, I just use a relatively inexpensive peeler (know that may not be the professional way to do it, but I find it easiest).

Glad you like cooking and have a very happy birthday.
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Old 04-26-2006, 02:09 AM   #5
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you're gonna probably have to drop some cash if you want a great knife or 2. my 5" wusthof santoku was $100, $80 since it was on sale. it is an excellent knife. i'd invest in a quality one. something for a few $$ is nary worth your cash. i have some cheapies that are ucky. if you want one, i'd get a santoku. it's a great multi-task knife for basic cooking.
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Old 04-26-2006, 08:58 AM   #6
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Forschner-Victronox (sp?) vere my first set of knives and they are fantastic for a starter set, i have worked with many cook's who started with them, very reasonale and feel great in the hand
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Old 04-26-2006, 09:13 AM   #7
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Good equipment does not need to mean spending a lot of money. Generally i will aggree that you get what you pay for, but not always. Like Chef Jimmy pointed out, Forschner-Victronox makes a very good product and they are not all that expensive. Whatever price range you are working within, I am sure we can suggest some quality products.
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Old 04-26-2006, 09:23 AM   #8
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Restaraunt supply stores care Dexter*Russel brand knives. I love soft gripp. They are very inexpensive and very good quality knives. The most expensive knife of that bran I bought was like $25 bucks, and that is 12" blade. Well, I haven't got it yet, it is on order.
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Old 04-26-2006, 09:24 AM   #9
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For other equipment, i strongly suggest finding a restaurant supply store. The products are very inexpensive because they don't have a "name" on them, yet made strong enough to stand up to everyday commercial "beatings" You can get twice as much for your money (or more) than going to BB&B or Macy's
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Old 04-26-2006, 09:27 AM   #10
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The trade off sometimes with restaurant supply stores (and it is a trade off I am more than willing to make) is what the stuff looks like. Generally (not always) the stuff you get at restaurant supply stores does not look all pretty like stuff you would get at a kitchen store. As long as you don't care about that then restaurant supply stores can be a treasure trove.
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