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Old 10-14-2008, 06:54 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adillo303 View Post
My hone, I call it a "steel", is not grooved, it is smooth. I use it, before cutting.

I am not sure if smooth is better/worse than grooved. It was in the cupboard when I bought the house. It's long, about a foot.

I also have Henkles, love 'em.
You have what is called a glass smooth steel and it is used for realigning a rolled edge on soft steels which include 99% of the knives available. Eventually the edge will become fatiqued and bits of it will break off. This is when the knife needs resharpening. A grooved steel is a file and will resharpen, but at what I consider a very crude level.

I haven't used a grooved steel in years. I realign my softer knives with a glass smooth steel and, when needed between sharpenings, slightly hone my hard steel knives with either a ceramic or a micro grooved borosilicate (glass with boron) steel.
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Old 10-14-2008, 04:33 PM   #12
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Provided it's not all nicked up, I'd rather have that 40 year old smooth steel than most new ones. I have found no good use for the grooved steels but smooth ones work well. Like Buzz, I prefer the glass "steel" to an actual steel one. I also have three ceramic hones of varying sizes and grits. They work very well so long as a light touch is used.
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Old 10-14-2008, 06:20 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adillo303 View Post
My hone, I call it a "steel", is not grooved, it is smooth. I use it, before cutting.

I am not sure if smooth is better/worse than grooved. It was in the cupboard when I bought the house. It's long, about a foot.

I also have Henkles, love 'em.
In my experience daily maintenance consists of touching up the edge of knives used daily with a smooth steel. When the smooth steel does not bring back the edge to the point where it will fillet a cocktail knapkin it's time for a grooved steel. When the grooved steel does not restore the edge, it's time to rebevel the edge with bench stones. The bench stone rebeveling is required every 3 to 12 months for frequently used knives, depending on the Blade Steel and frequency and manner of use. Only downside to highly sharpened knives is wear and tear on dish cloths & towels if you can't get the wife to not stroke the blade when she's washing & drying them.
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Old 10-14-2008, 07:35 PM   #14
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When the smooth steel does not bring back the edge to the point where it will fillet a cocktail knapkin it's time for a grooved steel.
I don't know anyone into high end sharpening who uses a grooved steel anymore. Under magnification, they reveal a ragged edge that saws but does not "cut" well so this step has been eliminated. When the edge comes apart, it's time to thin, sharpen, and polish the blade.

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