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Old 03-12-2009, 04:41 PM   #11
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When my knives get too far from sharp I take them to
a professional knife sharpener.
His 'acid' test of sharpness is to hold a sheet
of newspaper in one hand - loosely - and cut through it
with absolutely no pressure being exerted by the blade.
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Old 03-13-2009, 05:56 PM   #12
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For you tomato slicers, I received a new knife last evening and put my edge on it today. I thought you might like to see what a really really sharp edge does to a tomato. I took a medium sized tomato, sliced the bottom to flatten it, and sliced it using nothing but the weight of the blade. Knife support was a light touch between thumb and fore finger to maintain a vertical orientation. One stroke forward, one half stroke back. DONE!



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Old 03-17-2009, 01:39 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzard767 View Post
For you tomato slicers, I received a new knife last evening and put my edge on it today. I thought you might like to see what a really really sharp edge does to a tomato. I took a medium sized tomato, sliced the bottom to flatten it, and sliced it using nothing but the weight of the blade. Knife support was a light touch between thumb and fore finger to maintain a vertical orientation. One stroke forward, one half stroke back. DONE!
That's pretty amazing! What kind of knife is that? I'm guessing it costed a fortune?
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Old 03-17-2009, 01:41 PM   #14
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But maybe it's for the best. I kind of like having all my fingers, so a duller knife may not be such a bad thing.
I've heard dull knives are actually more dangerous because you wind up using all sorts of force and straining, which causes less precise control. Or maybe that's just what the knife salesman wanted me to think...
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Old 03-17-2009, 01:52 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by AlanS2323 View Post
That's pretty amazing! What kind of knife is that? I'm guessing it costed a fortune?
It's a 240mm Sakai Takayuki Grand Cheff (not misspelled). The blade is thin but not overly flexible and is made of Swedish Uddeholm AEB-L, the steel from which most safety razor blades are made. It has extremely small carbides making it easy to sharpen to very acute angles. I special ordered it through Seito Trading in NYC and paid around $175. The order was placed prior to 1-1-09 so the price may have gone up with the new year.

It's an unbelievably good knife.

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Old 03-17-2009, 02:00 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by AlanS2323 View Post
I've heard dull knives are actually more dangerous because you wind up using all sorts of force and straining, which causes less precise control. Or maybe that's just what the knife salesman wanted me to think...
That is true. However, inattention or improper cutting technique will land you in trouble with a sharp blade. Redeeming factors are that the cutting won't hurt much if you feel it at all because it will be cleaner and the cut will heal both faster and with less scarring.

The bottom line is to have sharp knives and use them properly.

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Old 03-18-2009, 12:55 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by buzzard767 View Post
It's a 240mm Sakai Takayuki Grand Cheff (not misspelled). The blade is thin but not overly flexible and is made of Swedish Uddeholm AEB-L, the steel from which most safety razor blades are made. It has extremely small carbides making it easy to sharpen to very acute angles. I special ordered it through Seito Trading in NYC and paid around $175. The order was placed prior to 1-1-09 so the price may have gone up with the new year.

It's an unbelievably good knife.

Buzz
Thanks for details. I see that Seito Trading has the domain "sushiknives". Does that mean this knife is only meant for sushi? Is there some downside to using it for cutting meat or tough vegetables?
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Old 03-18-2009, 02:22 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
It's not wrong or unreasonable to want sharp knives.

What's scary is that you have to sharpen your knives several times a week!

If you are referring to using a steel on the knife, that's not sharpening. I use a steel every time I use my knives. That's basic maintenance. If you're using some sharpening stone or tool that often, you need new knives.

I have a set of Henckels PRO S and sharpen them a couple of times a year. Any of my knives will easily cut through a tomato or bell pepper at any time.
What Andy said. But my knives are Wusthofs.
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Old 03-18-2009, 02:24 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by AlanS2323 View Post
So here's the thing...I have a cheap set of knives that I sharpen several times a week. I'm obsessive about them being sharp, but others have told me I'm being ridiculous and there's no need for a knife to be sharpened that often.

What I would like to know is what is a reasonable sharpness? Is there some kind of test that's recognized to mean a knife is really, really sharp? For me it's the tomatoes and bell peppers that get to me. If I have to apply pressure and really start sawing, I think the knives aren't sharp enough. Unfortunately, I've never gotten to that point with my knives...so I'm wondering if I just have impossible standards or whether my knives are substandard.
Curious, Alan, how you are holding your knife? That could be affecting your perception of sharpness.
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Old 03-18-2009, 02:44 PM   #20
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Thanks for details. I see that Seito Trading has the domain "sushiknives". Does that mean this knife is only meant for sushi? Is there some downside to using it for cutting meat or tough vegetables?
It's a Gyuto which literally translates as "cow sword". It's for veggies, fruits, and meats. It's a Chef's knife, except it has better geometry and the steel can take and hold a sharper edge.

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