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Old 08-11-2012, 08:09 PM   #61
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Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
There's something about edge up knives that makes me uncomfortable.
Me three! When I grab a knife off my block it's in hand and ready to use. Edge up I would have to either rotate it after picking up or rotate my hand as I grab it, an unnatural grasp, or seems to me. Of course I haven't tried it so I'm not speaking from experience.

Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Henckel, it looks like this:
Hey, we both have Henckels! In fact we have the same Henckels! Same triple rivet handles, same scissors, same everything except the block.

I haven't tried competing brands, just looked at them in stores, but I'm perfectly happy with my Henckels. BB&B sells that set, in blocks or open stock. In fact I love my Henckels set!

I think I have one of everything in that line except the carving fork, because I already had a carving fork and anyway the Henckels carving fork is flat, designed to fit in a block, and I completely filled my block. I just kept buying open stock knives I liked until the block was full. And then I bought the cleaver too. I even have two of the 4" paring knives, one of them dedicated to camping so I wouldn't have to take my good kitchen stuff when I go camping. It's my favorite small knife.

I think a good set of knives is the best investment any home chef could make. Some would argue it's the pots and pans...
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Old 08-16-2012, 01:06 PM   #62
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I feel like for what I am doing a Chefs knife could probably handle just about everything. Decision now is which one to choose from all the ones you guys mentioned. I will definately take into consideration paying for quality I completely understand that.

Someone recommended Global Chefs Knife. Does anyone know anything about Global?

Also What are the proper ways to clean quality knives?
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Old 08-16-2012, 01:36 PM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coballs View Post
I feel like for what I am doing a Chefs knife could probably handle just about everything. Decision now is which one to choose from all the ones you guys mentioned. I will definately take into consideration paying for quality I completely understand that.

Someone recommended Global Chefs Knife. Does anyone know anything about Global?

Also What are the proper ways to clean quality knives?
Good knives are usually made from stain resistant steel. Simply clean after using with hot, soapy water. If you clean them right away, they will stay in premium shape for a lifetime.

A bit of info about stain resistant steel; the resin stain resistant steel doesn't rust, is because it has chromium blended into the steel recipe. the chromium reacts with oxygen from the air, and produces an microscopic layer of chromium oxide, which is invisible to the eye, but which protects the iron from oxidizing (rusting). If the blade is left dirty, the food can prevent the chromium from protecting the steel, by not allowing the chromium oxide to form. This happens if the metal is scratched, which removes the oxide coating, and dirt prevents the chromium from reacting to form the new coating. The metal will pit, and or rust. Keep your knives clean, and wash by hand. It's easy, and fast, and will keep the quality of your blade intact.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 08-16-2012, 05:56 PM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coballs View Post
I feel like for what I am doing a Chefs knife could probably handle just about everything. Decision now is which one to choose from all the ones you guys mentioned. I will definately take into consideration paying for quality I completely understand that.

Someone recommended Global Chefs Knife. Does anyone know anything about Global?

Also What are the proper ways to clean quality knives?
I only have one Global knife, a 240 mm Sashimi Yanagi that I found, unused, in a thrift store, still in the box, for $8.00. The blade is beveled on only one side, right-handed knife. Made for shaving thin sheets of fish off those $1000 blocks of tuna for sushi. If I ever get my hands on one of those I'm ready, though for much of the tuna I see, a can opener will do just fine. It is an excellent knife, very good steel, well balanced, the entire knife forged, apparently, from a single piece of steel, including the handle. A working knife, it's beauty lies in its functionality. If in your price range, definitely worth your consideration.
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Old 08-16-2012, 08:07 PM   #65
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Never, ever put your knife in the sink. Ever! Over the sink to wash, sure...never in the sink. Did I mention to not put your knife in the sink? I did? Sorry, I feel very strongly about it!
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Old 08-16-2012, 08:17 PM   #66
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Good knives are usually made from stain resistant steel. Simply clean after using with hot, soapy water. If you clean them right away, they will stay in premium shape for a lifetime.

You might get an argument with that statement. Stainless are easier to care for than other steels, but many carbon steel and damascus will get much sharper and/or hold their edge longer.
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Old 08-17-2012, 08:18 AM   #67
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Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
You might get an argument with that statement. Stainless are easier to care for than other steels, but many carbon steel and damascus will get much sharper and/or hold their edge longer.
You'll get no argument from me on that one. I have a high carbon steel slicing knife that belonged either to my Dad or Grandpa. It was all rusty, and has no discernible nam on it any more. I cleaned it up with sandpaper, and steel wool. It takes an edge like crazy, and stays sharp. But it has to have a coating of mineral oil on it to keep it from rusting. I love the knife, but it can be a pain to keep the rust off at times.

For general purpose kitchen work, I love my Chroma 10 inch Chef's knife. It holds its edge well, and is easy to maintain. I have gotten it sharp enough to drop a tomato on it, and watch it slice all the way through, but only once. I saw the video and had to replicate it.

Another knife feature I like is to use a convex edge. It's stronger and gets ridiculously sharp. But again, it takes work to turn a factory v shaped edge to a convex edge.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 05-11-2014, 10:52 PM   #68
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I have two knives from Columbia Cutlery, an 8-inch chef knife and a 7 1/2-inch santoku knife.

I have that little Chicago Cutlery package of 4 smaller knives, i.e., paring, utility, sandwich, and a tomato knife. I don't use the tomato knife, but the other three are just great! The utility knife has a deep bellied straight blade. The paring knife is not serrated, either. The sandwich knife is just the right shape and size, for me.

All of these will serve me well. The utility knife made quick work of my NY strip steak, yesterday.
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Old 05-21-2014, 11:57 AM   #69
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I am a fan of Shun knives. But don't go buying knifes because one person or another said they like them.
I am a firm believer that knives are very personal, and that you need to pick up the knife, hold it, feel it the weight of it and the handle are very natural to you. An awkward knife is going to be bad news, no matter what the brand.
But as brands go, buy the very best you can afford. If a knife isn't locked in a display case running with the rest of the pack, you probably don't want that as an investment. But knives are an investment, one you will always be happy you made.
There is no comparison between a quality knife and a budget knife, no matter what the brand. There are many good quality brands.
Oh and I buy each knife individually, not as a knife block set. You can get a knife block, but it doesn't have to come with pre-selected knives.
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Old 05-21-2014, 07:58 PM   #70
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I'm very happy with my Henckels International block set, augmented until I filled all the holes, and then I bought the cleaver too.

I bought them at Bed, Bath and Beyond, and BBB has an unconditional 100% return policy. I never looked back. Every knife felt perfect in my hands! I filled in the set with several more knives and when it was full I bought the 6" cleaver, and made my own block just for the cleaver.

All I can say about whole chickens, leave it to cleaver! ;) (pun)

Maybe Henkels International may not by popular for everybody but I love my set, and as one of the more senior members of DC I expect my Henckels will last me the rest of my life. Unless I trip and stick one in an essential part of my body. ;)
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