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Old 12-02-2006, 08:10 AM   #1
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I bought the knives I hope they are the right ones!

After reading all of your responses to my previous post, I was in Macys last night and wanted to try out the knives as you suggested. They had three different Henckels for sale but only 2 (Classic and Twin Signature) in stock for me to try. My husband was with me and we bought the classic only because the steel said it was forged and the knife felt heavier. I was told however that the more little men on the knife the better. The twin signature said it was stamped the classic said forged. Also the twin was made in Germany and the Classic was made in Spain. Did I make the right decision or should I return them. Also they had steak knives by Henckel called Prime and Twin Steak. Is there a difference. They have serated edges but I was not able to feel how heavy these were. I know I am probably being paranoid over this decision but I want to make the right one. The kids are just starting out but I want them to have a decent set of knives. Thanks for all of the advice.

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Old 12-02-2006, 08:22 AM   #2
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Yes it sounds like you made a good choice and got good advice from the sales person. Forged knives are (for the most part) a better choice than stamped. German steel is very good steel.

I do not know anything about those steak knives, but I prefer serrated steak knives over non serrated. That is just personal choice though.

No need to be paranoid. It sounds like you did very well.
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Old 12-02-2006, 08:49 AM   #3
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Also they had steak knives by Henckel called Prime and Twin Steak. Is there a difference. They have serated edges but I was not able to feel how heavy these were. I know I am probably being paranoid over this decision but I want to make the right one. The kids are just starting out but I want them to have a decent set of knives.

We have steak knives in both serrated and plain blade and both do the trick. The plain blade are "dressier" for a nice dinner party (I mean ours--not just plain bladed knives). We use them so seldom for dinner parties. Personally I would not spend a bundle on steak knives. Almost ANY knife will cut a steak--or SHOULD be able to!!!
There is a Laguiole "look alike" (it is a Laguiole brand, but not the top of the line as you will guess when I say the price is $15) at World Market and other places. I think they are super good looking and my sister has given our kids those for Christmas in the past.

Take a look here for a selection. The cheapy Laguioles aren't there but some others are. And then all other kinds

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw...s=steak+knives
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Old 12-02-2006, 12:04 PM   #4
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Forged better than stamped. I'd say not in general any more.

I think forging is of no particular benefit in and of itself. What matters is the steel type, it's quality, tempering and design. Knives of equal quality can be made in stamped (more accurately a stock removal process) or forging. But stamped will be cheaper.

As to what knives are called forged today, well, modern production forging is not what many think it is. The knife is still "stamped"--really a blank cutting process. Cheap knives will be cut by stamping. Better knives by laser or other CNC techniques but shaping is a cutting process, not a forging process.

Production forging takes a blade cut from a "stamping" method and then mechanically-not humanly-pounding them at a moderate temperature. In true hand forging, this would be a shaping process but it isn't in the production forged knives as the shaping happened during stamping.

In both cases, the pounding CAN improve the grain structure of the steel. It really depends on the quality of the steel in the first place to whether it's actually useful. Modern powder/sintered steels can be of equal or better quality without any additional working.

Both forged knives and stamped knives are given bevels and any tapering in a grinding process, usually automated processes.

Both can make good blades, but neither method is automatically better than the other.

In Production Knives, a forged knife is a stamped knife. The differences in brands of knives arises from other issues than stamping/forging.

Even in hand made knives, forging vs stock removal is not a particular issue in final quality.

But a stamped knife can be of pinnacle quality and comparatively inexpensive.

thymeless

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Old 12-02-2006, 12:07 PM   #5
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Funny this topic is brought up at this time. I saw some Henkel knives at Target and it said on the packet, "Not recommended by Henkel Co." Made in China. So what the heck am I getting for my money? This is certainly not the real thing. Of course, I didn't buy them. I'm checking out Macy's today to see if I can find a good set of knives.
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Old 12-02-2006, 04:20 PM   #6
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Terrye welcome to DC. I shop at Macy's all the time and they have a great selection of knives. I think you made a good choice and it is also very helpful to get the opinion of the salesperson.

Forged knives are a better choice than stamped and German steel is an excellent steel.
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Old 12-02-2006, 07:25 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dina
Funny this topic is brought up at this time. I saw some Henkel knives at Target and it said on the packet, "Not recommended by Henkel Co." Made in China. So what the heck am I getting for my money? This is certainly not the real thing. Of course, I didn't buy them. I'm checking out Macy's today to see if I can find a good set of knives.

I put a 3 piece starter set of Anolon Brunello knives for about $100.00 less than what equivilent Henckles or Wusthof would cost.

8" chef's, 6" utility and a 3.5" paring knife set for under $70.00.

These are made from ice hardened german steel like other top cutlery.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_/0...o.x=13&Go.y=13
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Old 12-02-2006, 07:56 PM   #8
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For the steak knives I agree with the others about not spending a lot of money on them unless you think you will be using them really often.

http://www.amazon.com/Sterling-8401-...&s=home-garden
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Old 12-03-2006, 01:21 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron W.
For the steak knives I agree with the others about not spending a lot of money on them unless you think you will be using them really often.

Amazon.com: Sterling Home 8401 8 Piece Jumbo Steak Knife Set: Macy's
Even then, it's probably not worth it, imo. We've been using the steak knives that came with our block knife set for years and they cut the meat as well as any other steak knife I've ever used.

They're not pretty, though...if that's what you're looking for.
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