"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Knives
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-23-2006, 08:16 PM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kadesma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: california
Posts: 21,373
I needed my knives sharpened and really had no idea who, what or where. I was chatting with my daughter as we picked our the chicken, roast, steaks we wanted for the week. Young butcher pardoned himself for eavesdropping and told of a shop where he takes his knives..I took mine there and have been a customer ever since..They are fast and not expensive and are so pleasant when you come in. It's a pleasure doing business with them.Added to that I've not ruined anymore knives If you don't want to take a chance on ruining your knives ask a chef or a butcher..I've found them happy to help.

kadesma
__________________

__________________
HEAVEN is Cade, Ethan,Carson, and Olivia,Alyssa,Gianna
kadesma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2006, 01:00 AM   #12
Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 73
GB,
Is the Lansky Crock Stick Sharpener used as the "main" knife sharpener, or is it just used to touch up the edge between sharpenings?
__________________

__________________
gary b is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2006, 07:46 AM   #13
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Gary it is used as your main sharpener.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2006, 07:57 AM   #14
Master Chef
 
-DEADLY SUSHI-'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: NW Chicago Burbs'
Posts: 6,070
Send a message via Yahoo to -DEADLY SUSHI-
It looks like 2 chop sticks in a wooden base. Interesting!
__________________
-DEADLY SUSHI- is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2006, 07:26 AM   #15
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
I had a similar knife sharpening system years ago. I still have one of the ceramic sticks. I had a bit of trouble sharpening knives for years. I could get them sharp enough for use, but not razor sharp. Then, a freind from texas told me he could get my knives super sharp, and that my Arkansas stone was all I needed. I gave him the wet-stone and my knives. Not only did he sharpen them to perection, but he also cleaned the stone, which had become cloged due to metal particle deposition. I also learned a thing or two about sharpening. And this info works whether you are using a stone, or a cermaic stick.

First, know that a dull blade is going to require patience and time. Also understand that it is much easier to work with multiple stones, and finish with the ceramic stick, or a fine arkansas stone.

For a dull knife edge:
1. Start with a coarse stone. This will remove metal faster and shorten the sharpening time. Keep the stone wet with either honing oil, or water. Starting at the tip end of the blade, move the knife in an elliptical pattern on the sharpening material. Continue this motion as you move toward the handle. Sharpen at a 20 degree angle. Apply medium pressure. Turn the blade over and do the same to the other side. Repeat this process on both sides from between three to ten time, depending on how dull and hard the blade is. The blade will feel fairly sharp, but with a rough edge that will grab at delicate foods.

2. Repeat the above process using a medium grit stone. Test the edge by slicing through a raw carrot, and then a tomato. The knife should do reasonably well, but not great.

3. Repeat using a fine grit arkansas stone. The edge should bcome very smooth and sharp. Again test on your carrot and tomato. The knife should slice effortlessly through both.

4. Run the knife blade accross your ceramic stick, or fine grit Arkansas stone for a few strokes, as if you were trying to cut into the sharpening material, with light pressure, and at a 45 degree angle. This sill give the edge more staying power; that is, it will hold its edge longer.

5. Using a good honing steel, run the blade lightly accross the steel, again with the cutting edge forward to the direction of the stroke. Use this method to produce the best results. Stroke with light pressure 5 times on one side, then five on the other (30 degree angle here). Now stroke 4 times on both sides. Now repeat for three strokes per side, then two, and then one final stroke per side. This last step will remove any burr left by the sharpening and align the edge to razor sharpness.

My knives are now always sharp, and keep their edges for months, requiring touch-ups about twice a year. And once they're sharp, they take much less effort to sharpen. I hone them before each use. I maintain all of my knives in this fasion, including the small paring knives, the hollow ground knives, the straight ground chef's knife, and everything in between.

And this technique works as well on my cheap knives as on my high quality ones.

Sharpening isn't a mystery. Just think about what a knife edge is, what a sharpening tool does, and then remember that too thin an edge is fragile, and easily damaged (hence the 45 degree angle at the end). But you only want that strong angle at the very edge of the cutting blade.

You will find that after time, all sharpening tools will clog with metalic particles. To clean, use an old, but clean tooth brush and baking soda. Make a past of baking soda and water, dip in the toothbrush, and scour the sharpening too. This works equally well on oild-stones, wet-stones, and ceramic sharpening sticks or rods.

Hope this helps.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2006, 09:57 AM   #16
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Weed your info as usual is very accurate and informative.

The reason I like the systems as opposed to just using a stone is that I do not trust myself to keep the angle right. I have seen people ruin their knives by sharpening with a stone and not getting the right angle or not keeping the angle consistant.

I am actually a little nervous of that with this new system too as it requires me to keep the lade straight up and down, but I can judge that better than eyeballing a 20 degree angle.

Some day I do hope to work up the courage to try using just a stone though. That day will probably be if/when I buy a replacement chefs knife. I will get a stone and practice on my old chefs knife so that I won't worry about destroying my new one
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2006, 12:11 PM   #17
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Weed your info as usual is very accurate and informative.

The reason I like the systems as opposed to just using a stone is that I do not trust myself to keep the angle right. I have seen people ruin their knives by sharpening with a stone and not getting the right angle or not keeping the angle consistant.

I am actually a little nervous of that with this new system too as it requires me to keep the lade straight up and down, but I can judge that better than eyeballing a 20 degree angle.

Some day I do hope to work up the courage to try using just a stone though. That day will probably be if/when I buy a replacement chefs knife. I will get a stone and practice on my old chefs knife so that I won't worry about destroying my new one
It's really pretty hard to ruin a knife, unless you break it (yes, I've done that), or chip or couge the cutting edge (and yes, I've done that as well, but not with any knives I really cared about). If you change the edge by sharpening at the wrong angle, It can be reground to the proper angle fairly quickly by anyone having the right jigs and tools. Of course, if you are working with a hollow-ground knife, rather than with a tapered blade, hte blade thickness becomes much thicker, much faster as you move toward the knife spine.

I once saw a guy gouging an oil stone, drawing the cutting edge toward his knee. I thought to myself that he was either going to completely ruin the stone (he was actually shaving the stone with each stroke), destroy the blade, or slip and slice his knee open. I offered to assist, he took offense, and we fought. Of course, since he had the knife, I yielded while thinking about my options. Fortunately, a couple of shipmates saw what was happening and jumped the guy, pulling him away from me. It was the last day of a Pacific cruise on an aircraft carrier. Thing go a bit nuts on the day before, and the day of arrival in port at the end of a cruise. Fights break out all over the ship. There's a bit of insanity that seems to affect sailors on that last two days.

But I digress. If you feel the need to practice before trying your sharpening skills, purchase a cheap pocket knife and practice. You will quickly develop the knack and eye for determining the correct bevel angle.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2006, 09:19 AM   #18
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
OK I have had this now for a little while and have used it to sharpen my two most in need knives. The verdict is that I love this system. It works great. the first knive I used it on was my Santoku. This knife was in serious need of sharpening. I followed the directions to a T and found that it worked, but not as well as I had hoped. I realized that maybe I needed to make more passes on the ceramic rods than they suggested. I did that and it worked. My Sntoku is back in working order finally.

The next knife I sharpened was my chefs knife. This one was not in bad shape, but it was time for it to be sharpened none the less. I had been noticing lately that it was not as sharp as it could have been. i used the Crock Stick system on this knife last night and again gave it a few more passes (maybe about 25-26 instead of 15-20) over the rods. It worked perfectly. I cut up a cantoloupe right after sharpening and it went through like it was butter. I was thrilled.

I can't wait to sharpen my carving knife next
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2006, 09:22 AM   #19
Executive Chef
 
Michelemarie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Suburb of Chicago, IL
Posts: 2,614
Send a message via Yahoo to Michelemarie
GB, can I send you my knives?
__________________
Michele Marie
Michelemarie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2006, 09:29 AM   #20
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
You sure can. I am having a blast using this thing!

If your knives are better than mine though then the post office might accidently not send them back for some reason though
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.