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Old 01-10-2009, 12:25 AM   #11
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I've got the 10" version of this knife, and it is quite a bargain. VG-10 is a great blade steel when it's the core of a laminated blade.

I bought my brother a Forschner 8" chef's knife for Christmas two or three years ago, and he seems to like it. It was very easy to sharpen out of the box, and seems to hold the edge through his college-apartment cookery. Not that sharpening out of the box is necessary, mind you. I'm just terribly pedantic about my edges.
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Old 01-10-2009, 01:34 AM   #12
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Good First Knife

I really like the Tojiro DP as well. I think all of the recommendations given so far are fantastic.

Personally, if this were my very first good knife, I would stick with Wusthof Classic 8". The Tojiro and other Japanese knives are fantastic (I have quite a few), but I think for a first knife you should stick with a European design with a bolster.

The thing about Tojiro and many of the Japanese knives is that they are made with a harder steel, and are sharpened at a shallower angle. I think that sharpening these knives correctly takes a bit more skill, and would require you to purchase some good sharpening stones or know of a good sharpener who wouldn't destroy your knife.

Santoku's are great, but for overall versatility I think a classic chef's knife would be your best bet. 8" is good length for all sizes of kitchen spaces and for someone just getting the feel of a good knife.

Santoku's are lighter and typically have a thinner blade as well, where the chef's knives have some heft for some light butchering.

Wusthof Classic 8" (not the Grand Prix)has my vote, but if your dying to jump into the world of Japanese knives, the Tojiro DP 240mm is an excellent quality starter knife (about 9.5") the ONLY draw back to Tojiro is that you will be ordering it by mail, and I've received one Tojiro knife where the finish was not top quality (scales were not sanded down, had sharp edges on the handle).

Forschner is a great knife as well. If all you are concerned about is making the cut, Forschner won't let you down, but it is a stamped blade, no bolster, and lacks the craftsmanship and "cool" factor of the forged blades.

Getting the knife in your hand and testing it out is the most important thing though. A $3000 dollar knife isn't worth it's weight in salt if you don't feel comfortable using it.
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Old 01-10-2009, 01:50 AM   #13
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Knives

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Originally Posted by mikel18 View Post
I am looking for a good chef knife but I dont have a ton of money. I dont want to spend more then $50.00 for the knife. now I have looked around a bit and I see there is a Santoku knife so witch is the better choice? or is there not much differance? BTW if you have not figured out this will be my 1st good knife buy.


Mike,
I have been reading these postings on knives for quite a while.
I have opted for the economical route.
I have a 7" $9.95 Santoku that I have been using for about 6 months.
I venture to say that it will cut just as well as one costing $60.00 -- or more.
I can slice a tomato 1/16" thick. I cut all my vegetables for salads, trim steaks and roast. I will hit it with the steel every couple days. If it gets to the point that it will not hold an edge, I'll toss it and buy a new one. The $9.95 for a new one is a lot less than getting sharping stones and having to hone and sharpen a $60.00 one.

With the selection that is out there I'm sure you can find one that has the weight and feel you like.

Charlie
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Old 01-10-2009, 01:44 PM   #14
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wow I had no Idea there was such a wide range of knives! I can see there is a bit of work to finding a knife. well I guess thats part od the fun of cooking :) BTW I saw a knife that had a blade that says it never needs sharpened it looks like a cross between a surrated and a strait blade. whats your thoughts of that type of knife?
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Old 01-10-2009, 01:49 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikel18 View Post
wow I had no Idea there was such a wide range of knives! I can see there is a bit of work to finding a knife. well I guess thats part od the fun of cooking :) BTW I saw a knife that had a blade that says it never needs sharpened it looks like a cross between a surrated and a strait blade. whats your thoughts of that type of knife?
Don't do it!!! There is no such thing as steel not dulling under use. Just_say_no to marketing BS.
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Old 01-10-2009, 01:52 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hungry View Post
Mike,
I have been reading these postings on knives for quite a while.
I have opted for the economical route.
I have a 7" $9.95 Santoku that I have been using for about 6 months.
I venture to say that it will cut just as well as one costing $60.00 -- or more.
I can slice a tomato 1/16" thick. I cut all my vegetables for salads, trim steaks and roast. I will hit it with the steel every couple days. If it gets to the point that it will not hold an edge, I'll toss it and buy a new one. The $9.95 for a new one is a lot less than getting sharping stones and having to hone and sharpen a $60.00 one.

With the selection that is out there I'm sure you can find one that has the weight and feel you like.

Charlie
thank you for your insite on this matter I have seen a bunch of "cheaper knives" and I wondered how they might be.
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Old 01-10-2009, 01:53 PM   #17
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Don't do it!!! There is no such thing as steel not dulling under use. Just_say_no to marketing BS.
thats what I figured.
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Old 01-10-2009, 02:35 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikel18 View Post
thank you for your insite on this matter I have seen a bunch of "cheaper knives" and I wondered how they might be.
Just be aware that the 420 and 440 steel that these knives generally comprise take a really nice polish, meaning they will get nice and sharp pretty easily. Their low carbon content, however, means less time between steelings and sharpenings.
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Old 01-11-2009, 01:42 AM   #19
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Furis make nice knives for beginners. Soft steel that sharpens easily and well designed blades plus they can take a lot of abuse. There are features that I don't like about them, but for a starting out knife they're not bad and once you're beyond them and decide to upgrade it's not as if you spent a fortune.
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Old 01-11-2009, 02:17 PM   #20
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actually, the 440 grades of stainless are medium to high carbon content
(from .65-.75 for 440a, to .95- 1.2 in 440C)

low carbon steels are generally softer, and have less edge holding, meaning they need to be sharpened more often.

I over simplifyied things a little
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