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Old 02-03-2005, 11:17 PM   #1
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Is the Santoku the new fad?

Is it just me or does it seem like everyone on all the cooking shows on TV now are using Santoku style knives? It doesn't even seem to matter what they're using them for.

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Old 02-04-2005, 12:03 AM   #2
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fad or not, i would like to try one after having seen them so often on tv cooking shows. i think the wider blade may be easier to keep my knuckles on, and keep the fingertips from under the edge. it should be especially effective when making a very small chop, and with sticky stuff like garlic.
but i wonder how well the tip will go thru an onion when dicing... may have to go back to the chef's knife for that.
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Old 02-04-2005, 02:21 AM   #3
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Santoku

Bob,
I had the same concern but didn't want to layout the big bucks, any where from $50 to over $100 bucks.

On one of my trips to "Linens and Things" I saw a Santoku by Fauberware
for $9.95 (and I had a 20% off coupon).

I've used it over 2 months now and I like it. The straight bottom cutting edge seems to do a better job then rocking a chef's knife.

Bucky is right the wide blade does keep the knuckles out of trouble.

Those scoops, indents or what you want to call that are supposed to keep the slices from sticking to the blade, are worthless. I thought about drilling holes where the "indents" are to see it that would release slices.

I notice that Rachel Ray also has trouble with slices sticking to the blade
I had first thought I would buy this "chepo" and if I liked it I would spring for the original.

No use to spring for a more expensive one. This one does great. It is as sharp now as it was when I bought it. I can still get 1/8 inch slice of tomato.

Don't know what I'm going to do with more knives. But, at those prices I can throw them away when they get dull. :)


At my age I don't plan on buying any expensive cook ware.

I don't even buy green bananas!

Charlie
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Old 02-04-2005, 05:29 AM   #4
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Yeah, watching Rachael Ray trying to slice with it put me over the edge! That chick should start with a butter knife and work her way up. She is awful perky, though!

I'll concede that while I've never used a Santoku, it does look handy. By the shape it looks like it would be good for things too small for a French knife but that you want to chop or dice. I think you'd get a good rocking action with the slightly more rounded off end.

Maybe I'll have to jump on the bandwagon and pick one up myself. :oops: :P
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Old 02-05-2005, 11:55 AM   #5
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The Santoku is characterized by a severe drop-point blade. This enhances its ability to chop. It is great for it's purpose, and depending on the belly of the blade (how much curve the slicing edge has), can be used for both chopping, slicing, and mincing chores.

The main disadvantage of the santoku style blade is that you can't use it for applications that require a small or pointed tip, such as removing the stem from tomatoes or strawberries. The my ten-inch chef's knife is overkill for that job, I can to everything that the santoku does, plus remove the stems from feggies, and fruits, carve with good precision, and a host of other things, all with the same knife. I don't need so many specialty knives. The classic chef's knife, with the point dropped in line with the handle center-line, is the most versatile knife on the plant.

Again, the Santoku is a good knife. My youngest son, the professional cook, prefers the santoku. We have the same brand of high-end kife. He used to have several professional quality knives but has replaced them with just the one. I used to use several knives as well, in my home. But except for when I'm filleting a fish, or boning a ham or roast, I use the chef's knife exclusively.

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Old 02-05-2005, 04:11 PM   #6
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Re: Santoku

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hungry
Bob,
Those scoops, indents or what you want to call that are supposed to keep the slices from sticking to the blade, are worthless. I thought about drilling holes where the "indents" are to see it that would release slices.
Those hollow-ground indentations are to create air pockets and reduce drag while slicing. I don't know if they were help release a slice of whatever from the blade.

The only knife I own that's "hollow-ground" like that is my 15" slicer that I use to carve meats with. Yes, those do reduce the friction, making it easier to slice the meats. It also helps that I keep it razor-sharp.

I'm not really sure if the hollow-ground edge of a Santoku really helps or not, as it's kind of short to really notice a difference when you're slicing something.

With that said, my Exec. Chef, Sous Chef, and one of the other cooks have recently bought Santoku's, and swear by them. I don't know, though. I haven't borrowed one to try it. I'm happy with my 8" chef's knife, and the 10" chef's knives that are available at work.
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Old 02-05-2005, 10:27 PM   #7
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i was digging thru a box in the basement tonight and found a set of ginsu knives that must have been a freebie from publishers clearing house. my mil used to really believe that ed was gonna come to the house because all of those mailings said so. so she used to buy a lot of crap from them. but that's another story.

in the pack, i found a really cheap 6" santoku style ginsu knife. i tried it today, chopping the bird veggies and making dinner. i didn't like it. maybe because it is so cheap. thin and light, with a cheap plastic un-weighted handle. but i am used to rock chopping, leaving the tip on the cutting board while i rock forward, slicing away from my body. but the santoku did't lend itself to that with the curved down point.

i'm still gonna give it a few more tries to see if it has any particular function that it might be suited for.
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Old 02-05-2005, 11:54 PM   #8
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I use an French knife for 85% of all my cutting, honestly. I'll generally even use it instead of a paring knife- it's just what I'm used to. :oops: Occasionally I need something smaller, and sometimes only something thin and flexible like a boning or fillet knife will do. For example, if I'm breaking down a salmon, I could use a 10" Chef's knife, but I'd rather use a slicer. And of course it's pretty hard to fillet a pike or walleye (or smaller) with a heavy blade.

That's why when my Dad & I go fishing, I always seem to "forget" my fillet knife at home! :P
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Old 02-06-2005, 11:17 AM   #9
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Those ginsu's scare me. I'm to worried that I'm going to get hung up on a piece of cartilage or something, put a little pressure on it, and suddenly the miniature saw blade is going off on a wild angle and sawing into my hand.

I have to admit, I use my Chef's knife for probably 90% of all my cutting needs. After that, my paring knife, and my serrated bread knife (only serrated knife I own) get used.
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Old 02-10-2005, 03:14 PM   #10
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i gave the santoku ginsu a few more tries, but i still don't like it. going back to my chef's knife. the santoku didn't rock as naturally when chopping. i felt pressure in my wrist that was strange. i can imagine how bad it would get if i had to use it all day.

lol allen, i'm gonna save the ginsu's for the next time i have to cut 1/4 inch steel.
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