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Old 02-14-2014, 06:32 PM   #11
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I don't think it matters when you hone them except in a situation like yours. SO uses my knives at times and knows it's OK to use, wash and dry them but not to put them back on the wall. I hone them before they go back up so they're ready to go.
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Old 02-15-2014, 08:08 AM   #12
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Do not be afraid to hone your knives. Embrace the process. It is not only important, it is necessary. Your knives are not getting dull. They are still sharp. The sharp edge has just folded over. Honing will correct that.

I know what you mean about thinking you will do more damage than good, but it is not true. If we were talking about sharpening then I might agree, but honing and sharpening are different animals. Many people get confused about this because a honing steel is sometimes called a sharpening steel even though it does not sharpen. Hone slowly and don't use much pressure. The weight of the blade itself is enough. Go slow. Speed does not gain you anything. Wustof makes a very good knife. It is not going dull after a few uses unless you are cutting on a bad surface like glass or marble or something other than plastic or wood. Honing is absolutely what you need to restore the blades edge to where it should be.
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Old 02-15-2014, 09:16 AM   #13
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Ceramic knives are very low maintenance. But you do have to be careful not to chip them.
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Old 02-15-2014, 09:45 AM   #14
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I would ask the folks at your local market where they get knives sharpened, then take yours in for a new edge. In my area it costs about $2.50/knife plus $1.00/inch. About $10.00 for a chefs knife. Then begin your maintenance routine with a sharp knife and not a dull one.
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Old 02-15-2014, 01:50 PM   #15
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The guy that sharpens my knives recommended a ceramic honing rod, so that's what I bought and absolutely love it. The thing about these rods is that you don't have to pay a lot of money to get one that works well. I've seen them selling for as much as $225, which is simply ridiculous. I paid around $20 for the one I have.

You also don't have to be super accurate with the angle. Just get it in the ballpark. Use your fingers as a guide to get the angle right. The thing to keep in mind is that you are not "sharpening" the knife with a honing rod, but rather using it to return the blade back to "true". You also don't want to bear down on it too hard. Just lightly and smoothly stroking the blade across the rod a few times on each side will do the job.

Good video here that demonstrates different techniques you can use:
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Old 02-15-2014, 02:33 PM   #16
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I heard in a YouTube video that when honing a knife, it's better to err on the side of too flat an angle than on too sharp an angle. Too flat will just take a little longer. Too sharp an angle and you might nick the edge.
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Old 02-15-2014, 02:55 PM   #17
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I hone "horizontally", but move the knife to below the hone for the other edge.
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Old 02-17-2014, 05:00 PM   #18
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OK so my cheap knife block set I bought for the steak knives came with a honing rod. Can I use this one, or does it have to be a decent quality one to not damage the knife?
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Old 02-17-2014, 05:03 PM   #19
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It does need to be a decent quality one to not damage the knives, but decent quality does not have to mean expensive. If the steel is smooth and not ridged then you should be OK from my understanding. Someone who knows better can confirm that part for you though.
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Old 02-21-2014, 01:14 AM   #20
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Generally a knife that stays sharp longer will require more work to sharpen. If you want something that will stay sharp for a very long time, consider getting a Richmond knife in M390. Not cheap but the edge will last and last.
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