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Old 03-10-2013, 10:02 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danbuter View Post
If you spend more than $50 on a knife, you're buying an ornament, not a kitchen tool. I recommend Victorinox. It's used in many commercial restaurants, and you can buy them at a restaurant supply store for around $30.

In fact, I recommend you shop a restaurant supply store before hitting BB&B. You will find a lot of good stuff very cheap.
This... just lacks a lot of accuracy.
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Old 03-10-2013, 10:30 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I don't agree that more than $50 buys you an ornament not a tool. While Victorinox knives are serviceable for kitchen use, they are not the best available tool. Depending on one's level of expertise, a more expensive knife made with a different steel can provide better service. Whether or not you want or need better service is another issue.
I agree. I sure don't consider my Japanese blades ornaments, and they are not in the under $50 range.

In the under 50 range, I would look at either Dexter or Forschner.
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Old 03-11-2013, 12:30 AM   #13
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More money gets you much better steel and better heat treat. This leads to a knife that will get sharper and stay sharp longer than cheaper knives. Nothing ornamental in that.
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Old 03-11-2013, 08:25 AM   #14
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My opinion is if you want a knife a step above Forschner and Dexter, look at the Tojiro DP. The steel is clad VG 10, way above 440. CKTG often has them on sale, and often they are out of stock. They are on sale at this time.

IMO you are better off with a few good knives than a set. I would get a Gyuto as large as you can handle, and a petty, which is a small knife for paring. I like a Nakiri and use it often, but you can add any you think you might need.
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Old 05-05-2013, 07:40 PM   #15
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This may or may not fit in here, but I might as well try, has anyone here ever heard of or used Sekizo Japanese Gyutou Kitchen knives? I ordered one on Ebay for like.. $25.00
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Old 05-06-2013, 02:22 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bcrary3 View Post
This may or may not fit in here, but I might as well try, has anyone here ever heard of or used Sekizo Japanese Gyutou Kitchen knives? I ordered one on Ebay for like.. $25.00
I'll be curious to hear how you like it. They don't give much detail, and I wouldn't be too optimistic but for a home-use knife it might be okay. First off, there's no information about the steel- a red flag. Most Japanese knives from reputable makers will have the steel listed. They also call it a "gyutou" and a "sushi knife" but those are two different things.

Again, for the price I suppose it will do the job but I'd probably pass on it myself.
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Old 05-06-2013, 02:51 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
For me, Chicago Cutlery is just below Henckles for quality and price.
My boning and 8" Chef's knife are Chicago Cutlery. They take a good sharpening and keep their blade. I like them alot. If I were to buy any for a gift, it is what I would buy. Reasonably priced and comfortable in my hand which is small. I gave my elecrtric knife sharpener to my son and I use a hand held sharpener recommended by ATK. It does the job for me. A couple of swipes and I am back in business.
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Old 05-06-2013, 11:35 AM   #18
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I have all kinds of knives. I'm fortunate to live close by several very good thrift stores that receive donations from rather affluent areas, so I get to try out knives for next to nothing before I shop. I used Chicago Cutlery for years and liked it...stainless, comfortable grip, takes and keeps an edge with not too much maintenance. Then I started finding German knives in the thrifts, so I tried some. The difference in quality became readily apparent, with higher-end German knives being nicer to use than C.C. but the medium to lower end Germans being about the same, except that the forged heel on the blades of the German knives didn't suit me well. I got used to using that sharp heel on the CC occasionally and missed it. Then I found a new Japanese gyuto in a thrift and took it home. My $5 Masahiro gyuto. I use it daily, and it inspired me to buy a slightly larger Tojiro DP gyuto, which I use but not as often. I still have some C.C. that gets used, along with the Dexter Russell that I take to the church kitchen with me. A lot like C.C. but plastic handles, so they can go in the dish washer. I even found a set of bnib Michael Graves designed knives, 8" chef's, 5" petite and 3" parer, with hard rubber handles and forged blades. They sold at Target for a short time, then became unavailable. They're kind of nice for what they are. Forged blades, stainless steel. I have a couple of meat cleavers, an old French cleaver, compact but heavy, great for breaking down chickens and such, and a larger, newer Halco commercial cleaver, for beef, pork and lamb. Plus a large Chinese cleaver and a smaller, carbon steel nagiri that I just love. Wooden handle, and the collar that sets the handle on the blade is bone. Old, very nice. You can get lost in the world of kitchen knives, like me. It's easy to do. When you visit friends, ask them about their knives (seriously), and consider your pocketbook, but remember that a good knife is going to be your best, most often used tool in the kitchen. Shop and compare, buy the best you can afford according to your needs. I bought a new Global sushi knife, 11" blade, beveled on one side (right-handed) in a thrift for next to nothing. It's still new, as I have not yet encountered one of those $1000 hunks of tuna to slice for sashimi, but, boy when I do, I'll be ready. Good luck.
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Old 05-06-2013, 02:15 PM   #19
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There are not best knives - just those that are suited for you use.
@danbuter - if knives over $50 are just an ornament the most chefs have lots of ornaments.
Your knives are the most important tool in your kitchen. They make tasks easier or not. So get what works for you.
I use and sell Fissler knives from Germany. They combine German engineering with Japanese artistry. They feel good, keep their edge better than most and are reasonably priced on our web store. Check and compare and select those that you will use most.
Any questions I can answer regarding knives or related, please ask.
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Old 05-06-2013, 06:04 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I don't agree that more than $50 buys you an ornament not a tool. While Victorinox knives are serviceable for kitchen use, they are not the best available tool. Depending on one's level of expertise, a more expensive knife made with a different steel can provide better service. Whether or not you want or need better service is another issue.
+1

I agree with everything you said.
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