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Old 08-09-2011, 06:53 PM   #21
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you have some options for a 5.5" santoku:

Santoku Knife (5.5-in.) by Shun at Food Network
Amazon.com: Knuckle Sandwich 5.5" Santoku - "Chopper": Kitchen & Dining
Kyocera Ceramic 5.5" Santoku Knife/Y Peeler-Black Set , Gift Sets, GIFTS
Santoku, CLASSIC, 4182 / 14 cm
(and more, including ceramics - search with metacrawler "santoku 5.5" )

people with small hands usually disagree with the "massively manly" handle styles so common - see the handle of the first listing on Shun vs "many other makers"

steel, blade geometry, hardness etc etc are all important aspects of "a good knife" - but if the knife doesn't fit your hand and one feels uncomfortable using it - that knife will never become one's favorite tool, no cotton picking matter how much it costs.

there is massive amounts of BS, marketing hyperbole and outright lies/deceptions in the "knife market" - so take anything other than recommendations/opinions from people / sources you know with six or seven tons of salt.

take the idea that Cutco has such a wonderful warranty. oddly enough, if their reps would stop drinking the KoolAid and actually compare the written warranties of other major makers (posted on the net) there's little to no difference to be found.

free sharpening for life . . . well, read the fine print. shipping to + 'handling fee' + a second set to use while the other knives are out for service. my point? if you want to move into decent quality kitchen knives, you will need to seriously consider learning how to care for them - which includes steeling and sharpening. sharpening is not rocket science; a bit of practice is all it takes.

if the only"storage" option is tossed in the junk drawer with the can opener and scissors, might want to reconsider. there is no "fine" edged knife - metal or ceramic - that will stand up to that kind of abuse.

staining / "maintenance" - stainless stains much less easily than carbon steel. carbon steel stains nicely, develops a patina - if one is not "happy" with a patina'd knife, don't buy carbon steel knives because it is extremely impractical to keep them "shiny bright"

if you get into some decent knives you will need to develop the habit of wiping / cleaning them and putting them away "after use" in a proper storage "thing" - a block or such. in my kitchen, "use" could span 2-3 minutes or 2-3 hours - had them (stainless) for 25 years and they are none the worse for wear. and yes, now and then one gets left out overnight after slicing up an apple or such and no, the knife did not disintegrate.

nor can one blindly go by brand name. you probably know the "quality basics" - forged, full tang, rivets. well, some 'big name' makers have introduced less expensive lines of stamped knives.
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Old 08-09-2011, 07:08 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
I was going to suggest Gunter Wilhelm knives but I don't want to confuse you even more so just let me say that, immediately after you use your knives, wash thoroughly by hand, dry and put them away. Never put them into the dishwasher. Water can get in around the rivets in the handle and destroy your knives from within.
Those look very very nice
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Old 08-09-2011, 07:11 PM   #23
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My main knife is a Forschner and I love it! It was budget-friendly but good quality. I take good care of it and my husband sharpens it for me as needed. Knives are super easy to clean. Basically, unless I cut meat with it, I just give it a quick rinse and dry in right after I use it. Takes like 20 seconds.
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Old 08-09-2011, 07:16 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcSaute

if you get into some decent knives you will need to develop the habit of wiping / cleaning them and putting them away "after use" in a proper storage "thing" - a block or such. in my kitchen, "use" could span 2-3 minutes or 2-3 hours - had them (stainless) for 25 years and they are none the worse for wear. and yes, now and then one gets left out overnight after slicing up an apple or such and no, the knife did not disintegrate.

nor can one blindly go by brand name. you probably know the "quality basics" - forged, full tang, rivets. well, some 'big name' makers have introduced less expensive lines of stamped knives.
Excellent post, DC. Mine are in blocks or on a magnetic strip. Did not realize how many I had till I looked just now!

I always clean them immediately and never store them in the drawer.
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Old 08-09-2011, 07:16 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
I was going to suggest Gunter Wilhelm knives but I don't want to confuse you even more so just let me say that, immediately after you use your knives, wash thoroughly by hand, dry and put them away. Never put them into the dishwasher. Water can get in around the rivets in the handle and destroy your knives from within.
I like it. :-)

2-piece Asian Santoku Knife Set
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Old 08-09-2011, 08:57 PM   #26
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Is this for any stainless knives? Doesn't matter if it's German or Japanese?
Not generally. Most knives other than Japanese have a heavier bevel than the Japanese knives. Japanese knives are sharpened to different angles for different purposes, some are even sharpened with a chisel edge. Sharpening J knives is a learned skill. Forschners are typical of american knives, which the Edgepro made for.
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Old 08-10-2011, 02:28 AM   #27
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Not generally. Most knives other than Japanese have a heavier bevel than the Japanese knives. Japanese knives are sharpened to different angles for different purposes, some are even sharpened with a chisel edge. Sharpening J knives is a learned skill. Forschners are typical of american knives, which the Edgepro made for.
understood
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Old 08-10-2011, 10:16 AM   #28
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check a restaurant store and also Mad Cow Cutlery (on line)
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Old 08-10-2011, 11:52 AM   #29
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Personally i prefer victorinoxs they're cheap and they last really long and have a good handle and aren't like japanese knives which have a thin handle and a slippery one if you have wet hands. Also some japanese knives you can't cut acidic fruit with it since it'll corrode the metal
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Old 08-10-2011, 01:37 PM   #30
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I am just going to order myself a VF, and then my wife can use the handle. My friend is also going to let my wife borrow her Fiskars and see if she likes them.
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