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Old 12-07-2008, 01:34 AM   #21
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Why put a condition on a gift for someone if it is not something they want to do?
Mummy, Mummy, Can I have a puppy?
Only if you promise to feed it and clean up after it.
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Old 12-07-2008, 01:36 AM   #22
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His daughter is a grown woman. There is a world of difference between buying a puppy for a little girl and teaching her that it is a huge responsibility to take care of a living thing and buying a kitchen knife for a grown woman. Are you saying that unless someone hones their kitchen knives then they should not own them?
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Old 12-22-2008, 11:30 AM   #23
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His daughter is a grown woman. There is a world of difference between buying a puppy for a little girl and teaching her that it is a huge responsibility to take care of a living thing and buying a kitchen knife for a grown woman. Are you saying that unless someone hones their kitchen knives then they should not own them?
I agree with this, I have many friends and relatives that want high quality kitchenware but aren't necessarily experts in the field. They want something that will withstand the test of time, stay sharp, is not too expensive and will not be daunting for them to use. All people need is one very positive experience with a kitchen knife to get them hooked on that brand. In my experience, the best "middle of the road" type knives are made by Dexter Russell. They are made in the USA, are very high quality and not excessively expensive. They are great knives for people who want a high quality durable tool to help them in the kitchen.
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Old 12-22-2008, 12:16 PM   #24
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I agree with this, I have many friends and relatives that want high quality kitchenware but aren't necessarily experts in the field. They want something that will withstand the test of time, stay sharp, is not too expensive and will not be daunting for them to use. All people need is one very positive experience with a kitchen knife to get them hooked on that brand. In my experience, the best "middle of the road" type knives are made by Dexter Russell. They are made in the USA, are very high quality and not excessively expensive. They are great knives for people who want a high quality durable tool to help them in the kitchen.
I agree that Dexter Russell makes some good knives, at fairly reasonable prices, but they also make some knives that aren't very good. They are one of the largest suppliers for restaurants and commercial users (packing houses, etc.) I used a lot of Dexter Russell knives in my restaurant. They have several different lines and price points. Their cheapest lines aren't very high quality. I believe that most if not all of their knives are high-carbon, not stainless, steel so you have to take care of them properly.
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Old 12-22-2008, 12:33 PM   #25
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I'm with GB on this one. I used to have Chicago Cutlery before I got my Wustoff a few years ago. They were pretty decent kinves for the price. I don't know if the were made in China or the US though. Just don't buy those ones with the slick stainless steel handles that I keep seeing...wet hands...stainless steel handle...sharp knife. Whoever came up with that idea needs to have their head examined!
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Old 12-22-2008, 02:28 PM   #26
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... The knives that she has are most likely a hodge podge gathered over 20 years of marriage. Most likely one at a time. I have a really cheap knfe that I like a lot and cannot sharpen it to save my soul. I can keep my Henkles just fine. We (my daughter and me) are blessed with a kind of special relationship and I know that these will be more than just knives. Besides, if she manages to dull them, I can visit them and sharpen them for her, that is not such a bad thing.

AC

Since thats the case I would say any ~ decent manufacturers block set should do you. Some say block sets are a waste .... but they make a great gift.

I guess it really depends on the variety and types of knives in the set.

I have both a good and a beginner set of Henkles. Had I gotten the beginner set first I would have been quite happy, for a while. Since Wife brought the entry set home after I had acquired the Better set the entry set doesn't get used much and I have yet to sharpen them. All in all they would have been a great step up from my personal hodgepodge.
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Old 12-22-2008, 02:34 PM   #27
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Just don't buy those ones with the slick stainless steel handles that I keep seeing... Whoever came up with that idea needs to have their head examined!

An interior designer. ?

Don't worry, those 'knives' are probably safe in the kitchens of those who the design appeals to.

Come to think of it, the inexpensive Henkles has stainless on the back of the handle and rubber on all other handle surfaces. I don't recall there being a problem, the rubber grips pretty well, but like I say, I don't use them often.
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Old 12-22-2008, 06:19 PM   #28
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Just don't buy those ones with the slick stainless steel handles that I keep seeing...wet hands...stainless steel handle...sharp knife. Whoever came up with that idea needs to have their head examined!
The SS handles are incredibly hygenic, and all the better ones are treated in such a way that they're not slippery. Plenty of chefs in professional kitchens use knives with SS handles. SS handles can be very rough on your hands if you're using knives a lot.
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