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Old 01-06-2010, 03:08 PM   #1
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Knife Sharpener

I currently have an old old crock stick V sharpener by World Cutlery, similar to the Lansky professional V stick model. Am thinking of getting the Spyderco Sharpmaker. Would this be an improvement over my current V stick model. Any thoughts.

Carol

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Old 01-06-2010, 03:52 PM   #2
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The sharpmaker, as I'd imagine any stick V sharpener, tends to round or blunt the tips of pointy knives. I prefer Spydercos 2" X 8" ceramic whet stones. I have one each of the medium, fine and ultra fine grits. They can be used dry. The medium is fairly aggressive and is needed only when re-beveling is required. The extra fine is more expensive than the other two and a somewhat expensive luxury that I only use as an alternative to steeling on hard Japanese knives.. I find the fine grit to be the most used of the three.

Regular cleanup of the ceramic stones can be achieved with a gum or crepe eraser. On occasion, when I have stubborn metal buildup, I resort to soaking with a paste made from water and a Cameo or Barkeepers Friend type powder containing oxalic acid.
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Old 01-07-2010, 12:48 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
The sharpmaker, as I'd imagine any stick V sharpener, tends to round or blunt the tips of pointy knives. I prefer Spydercos 2" X 8" ceramic whet stones. I have one each of the medium, fine and ultra fine grits. They can be used dry. The medium is fairly aggressive and is needed only when re-beveling is required. The extra fine is more expensive than the other two and a somewhat expensive luxury that I only use as an alternative to steeling on hard Japanese knives.. I find the fine grit to be the most used of the three.

Regular cleanup of the ceramic stones can be achieved with a gum or crepe eraser. On occasion, when I have stubborn metal buildup, I resort to soaking with a paste made from water and a Cameo or Barkeepers Friend type powder containing oxalic acid.
Thanks Bill,

I am aware that you have to be careful of blunting the tip of the knives. I guess what I am asking is if anyone has the Sharpmaker and how happy they are with it. Maybe I should start a new thread with Sharpmaker reviews or something in the title?

I've tried a stone and just don't think I'm good enough at it. It takes a knack to master.

Hubby was impressed when I showed him a video of the EdgPro though. But that is VERY expensive.

Carol
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Old 01-07-2010, 12:58 PM   #4
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Arkansas granite, light weight machine oil, patience with an easy touch, and a leather or linen strop.

I was a scout and it just stuck with me.
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Old 01-07-2010, 08:44 PM   #5
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I had a Sharpmaker for quite a while (just sold it a couple months ago due to having more sharpening gear than I need), and it's pretty good for what it is. Its main strength is for touching up knives. If you need to resharpen a very dull one it will take forever; even the coarsest of the two sticks is too fine for hogging off metal.

As a touch up device it will keep your knives good & sharp. For major work you're better off with stones, a belt grinder or an Edge Pro.
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Old 01-07-2010, 08:59 PM   #6
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I had a Sharpmaker for quite a while (just sold it a couple months ago due to having more sharpening gear than I need), and it's pretty good for what it is. Its main strength is for touching up knives. If you need to resharpen a very dull one it will take forever; even the coarsest of the two sticks is too fine for hogging off metal.

As a touch up device it will keep your knives good & sharp. For major work you're better off with stones, a belt grinder or an Edge Pro.
Thanks Rob,

Do you feel the Sharpmaker is better than the 4 stick Lansky Crock Stick?

My husband saw the video of the Edge Pro Apex and was really impressed. Very Very Expensive though.

Carol
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Old 01-08-2010, 01:21 AM   #7
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I have both and the SpyderCo is at my station now. The CrockStick is now in the garage, and I still use it for garden tools and whatnot. Just remember that the SpyderCo is really intended to sharpen knives, not hone/re-cut blade profiles. I have used the gray stones for that - and they will wear out quickly. Also takes a LOT longer to re-profile a blade with the SpyderCo as compared to a flat stone.

I'm not impressed with the way the Sharpmaker's stones "rattle" inside their sockets; I have tried using bits of wet papertowels to "anchor" them in the past, but it's just not worth having a 2-3 degree shift in angle... They work fine the way it is designed, and I have not found a better design for what I need (I also have the Lanskey, various stones, and several other fine and not-so-fine sharpening systems) - the SpyderCo is the best all-around system there is... provided all your knives are either 15 or 20 degrees... I have managed to profile all of my cutlery to the SpyderCo angles... most use the "back-bevel" 30-degree edge. I'm experienced enough with it to cheat angles in or out to touch-up my wife's Global paring knife, my cleaver when needed. I ground my work knife to the 15-degree setting out of convenience - I use a 240mm UX-10 at work.

Anyway, if you like the crocksticks, you will LOVE the SharpMaker... it's a great tool for what we do.
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Old 01-08-2010, 01:28 AM   #8
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There is a trick to not blunting the tips on your Sharpmaker - don't let them "flick-off" the stone at the end of the down-stroke. Just let the tip land at the nase of the stone to a complete stop. I should post a youtube video or something on this... Yes, a risk but one that is easily mitigated with some user training.
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Old 01-08-2010, 02:01 AM   #9
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I think the Sharpmaker is superior to the round crock sticks, if for no other reason than that the flat areas of the hone make it easier to sharpen without rounding off the tip. The trick is to end your stroke on the tip of the knife, not letting it actually move off of the stone, as Trooper describes. It's a good tool that will do what it's designed to do and do it well. It has minor issues, namely the limitation of only having 2 angles and few stones, plus the rattle/slop of the stone in the slot. This seems to be pretty variable- mine had almost no play but my Dad's did have some slop. I guess that's what you can expect at the price. The other side of the coin is simplicity; the fact that it's pretty basic makes it easy to learn to use and hard to mess up. For $50 it's a darned good entry level sharpener.

Ultimately I sold mine because I'd "moved on" to the point where it was redundant. I keep enough knives at my work case that I can swap 'em out before they get dull, and I don't use knives at much at this job as I have at others. I do my serious sharpening at home on waterstones, using a glass hone to maintain my knives in the rare circumstance that they need a touch up at work.
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Old 01-08-2010, 11:22 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by trooper View Post
I have both and the SpyderCo is at my station now. The CrockStick is now in the garage, and I still use it for garden tools and whatnot. Just remember that the SpyderCo is really intended to sharpen knives, not hone/re-cut blade profiles. I have used the gray stones for that - and they will wear out quickly. Also takes a LOT longer to re-profile a blade with the SpyderCo as compared to a flat stone.

I'm not impressed with the way the Sharpmaker's stones "rattle" inside their sockets; I have tried using bits of wet papertowels to "anchor" them in the past, but it's just not worth having a 2-3 degree shift in angle... They work fine the way it is designed, and I have not found a better design for what I need (I also have the Lanskey, various stones, and several other fine and not-so-fine sharpening systems) - the SpyderCo is the best all-around system there is... provided all your knives are either 15 or 20 degrees... I have managed to profile all of my cutlery to the SpyderCo angles... most use the "back-bevel" 30-degree edge. I'm experienced enough with it to cheat angles in or out to touch-up my wife's Global paring knife, my cleaver when needed. I ground my work knife to the 15-degree setting out of convenience - I use a 240mm UX-10 at work.

Anyway, if you like the crocksticks, you will LOVE the SharpMaker... it's a great tool for what we do.
Thanks Trooper. Very helpful. When you sharpen do you just do the 30* or do you do both a 30* back bevel and then the 40*?
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