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Old 08-09-2006, 04:16 PM   #11
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P.S. same is true for fish producing plants, workers go thru knives in even less time.
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Old 08-09-2006, 04:18 PM   #12
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Fry Boy thank you for posting that link. It very much proves my point.
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Old 08-09-2006, 04:25 PM   #13
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FryBoy, thanks for the link.

It appears that high carbon steel is often harder than SS. Learn something every day!
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Old 08-09-2006, 04:28 PM   #14
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As I said, check that link for a table describing the many steels now available. I collect knives, and from what I've seen on most knifemaker's sites, 440C and AUS-10 seem to be the steels they favor most. Both have a Rockwell hardness of 58 to 60. The high-carbon steels that have a slightly higher hardness (61 and above), according to the information at the link I gave, are generally less suitable for knives, in part because some are not flexible and tend to shatter, and some are too hard to sharpen! Does that comport with your experience?
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Old 08-09-2006, 04:29 PM   #15
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Off topic.

Interesting, I was talking to a friend of mine today about the fact that I cannot debate things. No matter what it is. I try, usually try, not to make a statement or even simply say anything if I am not sure about what I am talking about, but if I had to prove my self I couldn’t. This conversation is a perfect example. In reality, I should have been the one to find a link to a knife maker page, or something similar that would explain my point in details, but I couldn’t. That makes me sad, I’m going to go cry now.
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Old 08-09-2006, 05:41 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FryBoy
I learned that these pros are required to buy their own knives, so they go for good quality. However, because of the frequent sharpening, their knives wear out in 3 to 6 months and must be replaced -- again, out of the workers' own pockets. Consequently, they buy much cheaper knives than most home cooks would pick.
I guess butchers would be a different category from someone like myself, but I've used the same Henckles Pro-S set that I've had since culinary school. Sharpen them all the time and hone them all the time, and the blades aren't wearing out. But then again, I don't use an electric sharpener and my blades don't go through as much abuse as a butcher's probably does.
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Old 08-09-2006, 07:01 PM   #17
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Dexter Russell

Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD
I have a bunch of them, came from Sam's club, very inexpensive. I do not use them a lot so they are ok, but can't say that i like them. The restaurant supply store I go to caries Dexter Russell brand, those I do like a lot. Not expensive but very durable. I especially like soft gripp handle.
Does Dexter Russell have a web site, and if so what is it?
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Old 08-09-2006, 07:02 PM   #18
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Old 08-09-2006, 07:24 PM   #19
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WOW, the 10 inch knife I have I paid $22 and 12 inch I paid $25 dollars. They are charging thru the nose on the site.
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Old 08-18-2006, 02:35 AM   #20
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On the Carbon vs SS discussion, SS (Steel with Chromium added) has Chromium carbides with a RC of about 70 (for the carbides NOT the steel) This adds to the cutting abitity of the edge via increased wear resistance HOWEVER Steel only needs about 1-3% Chromium to obtain this trait, adding more Chromium (like the ~15% in most SS) will then progressevly weaken the Steel. Steel need to contain 11.5% free Chromium to be considered stainless---adding more chromium makes the steel more "stainless" but less tough. FYI Vanadium carbides are 80RC! and you only need about 1/3-1/2% vanadium in your steel to get them. Think of carbides as micro saw teeth in the steel that are very hard (harder than the base steel itself. SS can out perform carbon steel even if both are the same hardness and contain the same amount of Carbon due to the presence of carbides IF it doesen't contain too much Chromium to lower it's performance (like the absurd 18% in 440A.) Another example.. 52100 is an awesome Carbon steel that contains a small amout of Chromium (1.5%,) not enough to be Stainless, but enough to form Chroium carbides. This is a simple carbon steel that usually outperforms (by a wide margin) "Super" stainless steels (like ATS-34 and VG-10)
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