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Old 01-08-2016, 06:03 PM   #71
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On what exactly are you basing your opinion? You made a blanket statement about having no interest in Japanese knives, but I don't see where you state you've ever used any. I have. I own several. I also have some nice (older) Wusthofs, and, yes, even a set of Chicago Cutlery knives that were handed down to me by my dad (a butcher). There are things I like - and dislike - about all of them. Weight doesn't matter as much as balance, in my opinion.

And by the way, the heaviest knife I own is one of those old CC knives. But the thing is a bear to use and very unwieldy. About the only good thing I can say about it is that it stays sharp.
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Old 01-09-2016, 08:04 AM   #72
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Thread cleaned up of irrelevant posts.
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Old 01-09-2016, 02:53 PM   #73
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
On what exactly are you basing your opinion? You made a blanket statement about having no interest in Japanese knives, but I don't see where you state you've ever used any. I have. I own several. I also have some nice (older) Wusthofs, and, yes, even a set of Chicago Cutlery knives that were handed down to me by my dad (a butcher). There are things I like - and dislike - about all of them. Weight doesn't matter as much as balance, in my opinion.

And by the way, the heaviest knife I own is one of those old CC knives. But the thing is a bear to use and very unwieldy. About the only good thing I can say about it is that it stays sharp.
Alright just to put this to rest I had several Shun and a few Global knives a few years ago and just didn't like them. This is just my opinion and I'm not trying to force it on anyone. It is my opinion which I am entitled to.
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Old 01-09-2016, 04:09 PM   #74
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Hi all, I'm dipping my toes in the forum for the first time, I've only just started to take cooking more seriously and I'm learning all the time. So when it came to choosing a proper knife I had some cooking school advice ringing my ears - price is not as important as a knife that feels comfortable in the hand- shame then that no one near me allowed you to handle the knives before hand.
In the end I opted for a 20 cm Robert welsh chefs knife for my first knife. A nice knife for sure but then shortly after I stumbled across a much less costly "stellar santoku 18cm". I love that knife and use it daily. The gorgeously looking, resurringly expensive and we'll made Robert welsh sits idol. Very sad.
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Old 01-20-2016, 01:41 PM   #75
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I've been a cutlery merchant for 18 years. There is little doubt that the Japanese make the best kitchen cutlery on the planet. I use them exclusively and have perhaps 25 or 30 of them in my kitchen. They use harder steel which allows them to make thinner and sharper blades that will hold the edge longer, they are lighter for less fatigue and most of them are balanced at the correct point just in front of the handle or bolster.

I think these are important for kitchen pros and I think all chefs and cooks should at least have a Japanese gyuto (chef knife.) For home use these things aren't so important. We westerners tend to use different cutting techniques than the Japanese so the handle heavy German, French and American knives are seen more here.

But if a home cook can justify spending $250 or more for a fine Japanese gyuto, they won't be disappointed.
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Old 01-20-2016, 06:56 PM   #76
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I'd love to try a good Japanese knife. For the last 5 years I've used a Kai Pure Komachi 2 Santoku general purpose knife and a Kai bread knife. They are made of high carbon steel and super sharp. Can't beat the price. I think both were $10 at TJ Maxx. I bought half dozen of them and given them away as gifts. They seem to be way better than the average knifes people have. But they probably can't compare at all to a profession quality knife.



I use it for basically 80-90% of kitchen duties.
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Old 01-20-2016, 08:48 PM   #77
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I'd love to try a good Japanese knife. For the last 5 years I've used a Kai Pure Komachi 2 Santoku general purpose knife and a Kai bread....... .

As long as they are made in Japan, they are ok. I have a bread knife like that, it's made in Japan. But then I also had one that looked the same but was made in China. What a garbage.


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Old 01-21-2016, 12:49 PM   #78
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Stil loving my Chroma 301, 10-inch chef's knife. It holds its edge extremely well, and uses a convex grind, with it stronger. It is easy to sharpen when needed (about twice in the last 13 years), and hones on a steel to perfection in a couple of minutes. The handle is what really sets it apart. it looks uncomfortable, but is exactly the opposite. The narrow vertical profile near the bolster, that melds into the blade, provides great latteral stability with a pinch grip, while the heal of the handle broadens to a wide lateral profile, which allows me to use as much force as needed when slicing through hard things like winter squash. It's my goto mincing knife for fresh, and dried herbs as well.

I used it alongside a more traditional (Henkels) chef's knife at a whole-hog pulled pork event and found that when the two knives got slippery oils all over them, the shape of the Chroma kept it from sliding in my hand, while the Henkles became hard to manage.

Nope, I'm not a Chroma saleman, just a guy whose tried many different knife styles and found what fits him. One of my sons is a professional cook and has purchased all Chroma 301 knives and loves them. He has had other cooks try to use his knives because they just work. Those other cooks have dropped them on ceramic tile floors and broke them, or misused them for things other than slicing/chopping food and ruined them. He has a strict policy of no one touching his knives. If they get caught, yeh, my son is capable of backing down most adult men that he works with. They don't use his knives any more. A chef's knives are his most important tools.

Here's a link to Amazon reviews- Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Chroma Type 301 Designed By F.A. Porsche 10 Inch Chef Knife P01

And a link to a seller - http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&key...l_1w29dodxaj_b

The reason I'm talking about this knife is that it's lightweight, sturdy, well balanced, and cuts like crazy. I think most who try it, and use a pinch grip properly, will love this knife. I do. And I like to share what I think works, and will benefit others.

Seeeeee3ya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 01-22-2016, 01:05 AM   #79
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As long as they are made in Japan, they are ok. I have a bread knife like that, it's made in Japan. But then I also had one that looked the same but was made in China. What a garbage.


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I think they're actually made in China because they are so cheap. I see them for like $8 for the chef's knife and about $6 to $8 for the other knives.

BUT they are still decent knives. A lot of people have really, really crappy knives. I was at a friend's house and they had the typical $15 Wal-Mart block of knives and some even had broken handles. And they were dull as heck. I had to saw into the veggies I was trying to dice as I was helping them cook.

I gifted them a Kai Pure Komachi chef's knife, and they were like: "Oh that's too generous! We aren't chefs. We won't use it to its full potential!" They thought it was expensive and didn't want to accept it, so I had to say: "dude, it was $8 at TJ Maxx, just take it."
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Old 04-19-2016, 03:24 PM   #80
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NewWest

The latest additions to my quiver are from NewWest Knifeworks out of Wyoming. They are All American, including the S35 steel from Crucible Steel in Syracuse. Sort of a boutique knife maker. They make good stuff. I sharpen my own knives and am in the process of evaluating whether the S35 steel lives up to its great reputation on all the bladehead forums for edge retention and sharpenability. I don't know yet because none of them have started to go dull yet.
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