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Old 11-08-2008, 01:11 PM   #31
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I don't know what kind I am looking for.... it certainly doesn't need to be custom made, so yes, a mass produced brand name I guess.

If anyone here can fine me a store nearby to see these knives in person, have at it. I thought I was onto something because I found a boatload of brands and styles at Macy's online, and there is a Macy's by me.... only to call them and find out they only carry two chef's knives. Just two. Out of fifty or so they have online.
I'm not going to drive 2 hours to buy a knife from a cutlery store, assuming there is one in Pgh or Cleveland or Buffalo. I appreciate the advice though.
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Old 11-08-2008, 01:15 PM   #32
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I've been using my cheapo chef's knives and would like to invest in a slightly better quality one. One I would care for, but I would like to find one that doesn't need touched up every time I take it out. I merely need it to hold a decent edge for a non-chef type like me, who only requires that the knive cut food and not be one with myself or something I make a living with.

After going back through several pages here I think I am going to stick with a chef's knife rather than those santokus (sp?), but I'm not opposed to ordering of one those either, just to give it a try. I might even like it for certain things. Anyway, I Googled and came upon a knife site (knife depot) and by name alone, clicked on the Victorinox line. Something about Swedish made, so what the hey. I know it would be nice to hold the different knives and decide that way, but that's not an option, so online ordering from looks and rating alone will have to suffice.
So the one I was looking at "seems" like a good choice. And I did a cross-reference at Amazon and those users rated it high, then I noticed it had a twin, that one was forged.... which leads me to ask, what's the difference? Would I notice a difference? The forged one is obviously more expensive, so that would lead me to think it's a better knife, but would "I" notice a diffrence? Does it hold an edge longer, is it harder to sharpen? No idea here....

And I am not opposed to going to an entirely different line, but obviously all the choices can be a bit overwhelming. And I would like to stay away from wood handles.

Any advice or answer to my forged vs stamped (?) question?

Thanks

no, forging does not produce a superior knife vs. stamped. The type of Steel, edge geometry, and proper heat treating does.( it just so happpens though, that most forging places do well at heat treating)


Without getting all crazy with science and technical details..... Henkels makes a decent knife for the money.
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Old 11-08-2008, 01:25 PM   #33
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I was just looking at some Henckels knives. They sure do vary in price for an 8" chef's knife, 40 to 140 +-. And within the same style a 9" knife is less money than the 8". Talk about adding to the confusion.
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Old 11-08-2008, 01:30 PM   #34
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Beware!

Henckels and Wusthof make several grades of knives. Henckels logo tells the story. The logo that depicts two stick figures is for the top quality lines while the logo with a single stick figure is for their "budget" knives.

I have the Professional S knives and I'm quite happy with them.
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Old 11-08-2008, 01:33 PM   #35
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I was just looking at some Henckels knives. They sure do vary in price for an 8" chef's knife, 40 to 140 +-. And within the same style a 9" knife is less money than the 8". Talk about adding to the confusion.
Thats sort of why you need to handle them, unfortuantly
You can definatly notice the difference from the bottom to the top of the price range, not only by quality, but also by how it feels in your hand.

That being said, I understand you want 'slightly" better quality than what you have. My father in law told me a long time ago, "buy the best tools you can afford".
Turns out he's been right about 99% of the time. I've messed around buying 2 or 3 cheap tools, and if I would have spent the money in the first place I would have saved myself alot of greif. Just think, if it's a good knife it could last you the rest of your life :)
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Old 11-08-2008, 01:44 PM   #36
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Well going by looks alone, I love this knife. Henckels Twin Cuisine 8-in. Chef's Knife - Henckels Chef's Knives
I just have the feeling that I would like the ergonomics of the handle. Free shipping, Henckels sharpener, which would probably be all I need instead of digging out the old Lansky. But 100 bucks for a knife? I'm sure I could get by with a lessor priced knife like I have been. Maybe a $69 forged Victorinox (?), but how do I know.... That's why I'm trying to get a feel for what the members here like. It's all I can go by without a store.
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Old 11-08-2008, 02:09 PM   #37
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Well going by looks alone, I love this knife. Henckels Twin Cuisine 8-in. Chef's Knife - Henckels Chef's Knives
I just have the feeling that I would like the ergonomics of the handle. Free shipping, Henckels sharpener, which would probably be all I need instead of digging out the old Lansky. But 100 bucks for a knife? I'm sure I could get by with a lessor priced knife like I have been. Maybe a $69 forged Victorinox (?), but how do I know.... That's why I'm trying to get a feel for what the members here like. It's all I can go by without a store.
Accck
Some people like a thinner blade which the stamped usually are and others like a thicker blade. The forged usually run from a little thicker to a lot thicker than the stamped. For home use I can tolerate most any handle long as I can get the blade to take a good edge. Since Sani-safes are reasonably priced high carbon stainless, I suggest you try one before deciding to spend big bucks.
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Old 11-08-2008, 02:41 PM   #38
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Well going by looks alone, I love this knife. Henckels Twin Cuisine 8-in. Chef's Knife - Henckels Chef's Knives
I just have the feeling that I would like the ergonomics of the handle. Free shipping, Henckels sharpener, which would probably be all I need instead of digging out the old Lansky. But 100 bucks for a knife? I'm sure I could get by with a lessor priced knife like I have been. Maybe a $69 forged Victorinox (?), but how do I know.... That's why I'm trying to get a feel for what the members here like. It's all I can go by without a store.
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Earlier you mentioned the Victorinox knives. I have owned three Victorinox forged, paring, slicer, and chef's. The steel is forged in Solingen, Germany and then I assume assembled in Switzerland. The knives are well made, good looking, and comfortable to use. They sharpen easily and if you are are home cook the edge will last long enough. If you're a pro, forget it, too soft. Look at them as a Forschner upgrade because they are made by the same company - also make Swiss Army Knives.

I'm just guessing, but it is probably the same small handful of mills that produce the forged steel for Victorinox, Wustof, Henckel, and others. Like I said, it's soft and will not sharpen to the degree better steels will (if you're into that).

That 8" Twine Cuisine costs a hundred bucks. Frankly, it's not much of a knife for that price. For about forty bucks more, call here and get a price, you can get a 21mm (8.3") Takayuki Grand Cheffs model #10012 (see it here). It's made of Swedish AEB-L stainless steel, same stuff from which razor blades are born. It sharpens extremely easy and to a much greater degree of sharpness than anything from Solingen, and it lasts much longer. They are also thinner than their German counterparts so less friction while cutting. More info if you want.

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Old 11-08-2008, 02:56 PM   #39
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About that Alton Brown steeling video reference earlier, if you follow his advice you'll never touch the edge. He recommended a fifteen degree angle. The reason for this is because he pushes Shuns (for money) and they come from the factory sharpened 16 degrees per side. the 15 degree degree angle of which he speaks will just barely touch the edge - perfect - ON A SHUN. Almost all German knives are sharpened at angles vaying from 22 to 25 degrees per side. Try 15 degrees with the steel on those and all you'll do is scratch the blade somewhere above the edge. Simple geometry.
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Old 11-08-2008, 03:01 PM   #40
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Thanks Buzzard. I saw a Victorinox for less than the Henckel that I like the looks of, too. It has a similar styled handle.
I'm kind of wondering if I wouldn't prefer a thinner blade now, too, since that is what I am used to.
I'm kinda in a pickle being in a cutlery deprived area.
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