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Old 11-30-2008, 11:32 PM   #11
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There are no performance benifits to a knife being forged, it doesn't make them harder or hold an edge any longer.
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Old 11-30-2008, 11:38 PM   #12
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There are no performance benifits to a knife being forged, it doesn't make them harder or hold an edge any longer.
Hmmm. I get the feeling this is something of a religious war amongst those who are in-the-know.

I'll step back slowly.

:)
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Old 11-30-2008, 11:43 PM   #13
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Hmmm. I get the feeling this is something of a religious war amongst those who are in-the-know.

I'll step back slowly.

:)
nope, no war, just an old myth.
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Old 12-01-2008, 12:22 AM   #14
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nope, no war, just an old myth.
In the olden days with unreliable steel quality forging did help prevent blades snapping. The main benefit now is the bolster which many people find more comfortable for use.

But in terms of edge performance forging doesn't do terribly much, if anything at all.
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Old 12-01-2008, 01:06 AM   #15
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In the olden days with unreliable steel quality forging did help prevent blades snapping. The main benefit now is the bolster which many people find more comfortable for use.

But in terms of edge performance forging doesn't do terribly much, if anything at all.

And in many cases, the bolster is designed such that how much the knife can be sharpened is limited, which effectively shortens the useful life of the knife.

I think that European knife companies do tend to use their best steels in their forged blades, but Japanese companies don't necessarily have that tendency.
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Old 12-01-2008, 01:27 AM   #16
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You are too funny!
It's TRUE! He's a worthless mooch pothead. She knows I'm really much better for her. She's coming around to realizing this, and I need to drive the point home!
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Old 12-01-2008, 03:14 AM   #17
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And in many cases, the bolster is designed such that how much the knife can be sharpened is limited, which effectively shortens the useful life of the knife.

I think that European knife companies do tend to use their best steels in their forged blades, but Japanese companies don't necessarily have that tendency.

Thats actually incorrect. A majority of japanese manufactuers use steel from Hitachi metals. Ao-ko and Shiro-ko steels have very tight tolerances from the steel mills and give very consistant results when heat treated.
Add the "stainless" versions from japan, such as Cowry-y and ZDP189, and they are some of the finest steels in the world.
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Old 12-01-2008, 03:20 AM   #18
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In the olden days with unreliable steel quality forging did help prevent blades snapping. The main benefit now is the bolster which many people find more comfortable for use.

But in terms of edge performance forging doesn't do terribly much, if anything at all.

Back in the day..."days of Yor" etc..

steels were forged to work out some of the impurities, and simply because forging is an efficient was of using metal. The japanese actually add corbon to the steel as part of the forging process of tamahaganae.
Proper heat treating is what determines if a blade is soft/hard flexable/brittle.
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Old 12-01-2008, 06:23 AM   #19
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Thats actually incorrect. A majority of japanese manufactuers use steel from Hitachi metals. Ao-ko and Shiro-ko steels have very tight tolerances from the steel mills and give very consistant results when heat treated.
Add the "stainless" versions from japan, such as Cowry-y and ZDP189, and they are some of the finest steels in the world.
Either you misunderstood my comment or I'm not understanding yours because as far as I can tell, what you are saying does not contradict what I said. I have a feeling it was you not understanding me because I'm not a very good writer and I really did have trouble composing that last sentence to communicate what I was trying to say and not sound extemely awkward.

What I was trying to say was that the Japanese knife companies, unlike European knife companies, will use their best steel in knives that are not forged.
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Old 12-01-2008, 08:24 AM   #20
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This Wusthof seems to be a well-regarded example of a well-regarded brand, at a good price on Amazon:

Amazon.com: Wüsthof Classic 7-Inch Hollow Edge Santoku Knife: Home & Garden
Yes, Wusthof makes a great knife. Just remember that if she has small hands she might feel more comfortable with the smaller santoku. A matching paring knife or utility knife would be a nice compliment.
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