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Old 03-06-2008, 10:12 AM   #21
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I'm looking for a good chef's knife - interested in saving money - don't care how it looks but want it to work well. Any suggestions? I keep hearing about the Wusthof classic 8" chef but is it better to get it hollow edge (dimpled) or not?
Hollow ground is up to you really, i dont see a point in it, but others swear by it. Whustofs are great, but if your planning on spending 125 bux on a knife, cutleryandmore.com has an incredible deal on Tojiro's 'Flash' line of knives. you can get a 7 inch santoku for 125 bux with free shipping. ive only been able to find them for sale on that website for the states, and the price is at least half of what all the UK sites are selling them for. I just picked up their 7" Nakiri from the same site for 100 bux and i love the thing. it comes factory sharpened at about 12 to 14 degrees and has a core of VG-10 steel wrapped with 63 layers of softer steel, using the same technique that was used to make samurai swords centuries ago. I highly reccomend them to anyone looking a new knife right now and is willing to spend 100 to 125 dollars.
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Old 03-06-2008, 10:46 AM   #22
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Just to clear something up. A granton edge has the individual scalloped reliefs along the edge. Hollow ground is a sharpening method where there is a slight curve just above the cutting edge. Most sushi knives are hollow ground on one side to keep the slices from sticking to the blade.

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Old 03-06-2008, 05:57 PM   #23
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Just to clear something up. A granton edge has the individual scalloped reliefs along the edge. Hollow ground is a sharpening method where there is a slight curve just above the cutting edge. Most sushi knives are hollow ground on one side to keep the slices from sticking to the blade.
Many Japanese single edged knives are not only hollow ground on the back (appears to be flat but is not) side but ALSO on the relief grind on the front side.
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Old 03-07-2008, 09:48 AM   #24
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Absolutely right, Jeekinz, though I imagine the part of the blade covered by the granton is technically hollow ground if only for those isolated spots. That was my reasoning behind my "grantons are only really effective when they extend all the way into the secondary bevel"-theory. Still, "hollow grouond" in popular kitchen cutlery parlance definitely seems like a misnomer.
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Old 03-07-2008, 10:23 AM   #25
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Like Grilling and BBQing.

Don't forget about semi-hollow ground. lol
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Old 03-28-2008, 01:31 PM   #26
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My favorite knife is my Thiers Issard 6" carbon steel knife.

I have forged 6"-8"-10" knives, a santuko, plus my professional Forschner's, but the knife that I reach for at home is the French-pattern carbon steel knife.
I'm with you on the carbon steel Flourgirl. I've a Sabatier Elephant Logo in 10" from the Canadian Massif manufacturers. At home, it's all I use - afraid to take it to work.
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Old 03-28-2008, 02:33 PM   #27
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I'm with you on the carbon steel Flourgirl. I've a Sabatier Elephant Logo in 10" from the Canadian Massif manufacturers. At home, it's all I use - afraid to take it to work.
Canadian Massif manufacturers? Sab 4 Star Elephant is a logo owned by Thiers-Issard in Thiers, France. They might have imported the like Rowoco did.
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Old 03-28-2008, 03:28 PM   #28
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Canadian Massif manufacturers? Sab 4 Star Elephant is a logo owned by Thiers-Issard in Thiers, France. They might have imported the like Rowoco did.
Yeah, sorry. The Canadian knife is an Elephant Logo and licensed by Thiers-Issard and made from historical high carbon blanks from Thiers, France. I believe that the Massif refers to the style of the blade. You can get the whole story through thebestthings.com.
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Old 03-28-2008, 03:37 PM   #29
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Yeah, sorry. You can get the whole story through thebestthings.com.
I know a lot about TBT - they're my importer. Check this out.
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Old 04-30-2008, 03:54 PM   #30
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Lamson and Goodnow makes some really great knives. Few people know this but in addition to their terrific LamsonSharp line they also make the professional grade molded handle Forschners and also some of the Victorinox knives. They are America's oldest continuously operated cutlery and one of the oldest manufacturing companies in the USA period. They are a family owned business and their workers are union members. Really great people too all around. I heartily encourage cooks to support them and their great products.
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