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Old 04-07-2009, 12:00 PM   #1
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Question New here - need advice

Hi to all - I'm new here and I would like some cutlery advice. I am trying to purchase a new, small number block set for my new house for around $100-$150, the lower the better. I found a Henckels TWIN Signature 7-piece for $109 and a Henckels International Forged Synergy 13-piece for $140. Numbers aside, would you folks say the low-end TWIN knife with its FRIODUR treatment, but stamped design be better or worse than the high-end International knife without the FRIODUR but forged design?

Thanks in advance for any info.

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Old 04-07-2009, 12:14 PM   #2
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Welcome to DC.

I think you have the values wrong. The Twin Signature line is a higher grade knife than the International Forged Synergy.

If you look at the logos on the knife blades, you will see the Twin has a two stick figure logo while the Int'l Forged has a single stick figure logo. This is how Henckels identifies its better and budget lines.

That being said, I would recommend you don't buy the set but look for 3-4 knives good quality knives will handle all your needs.

I'd go with an 8" Chef's knife, an 8" to 10" serrated bread knife and a 4" paring knife. Beyond that, a boning knife might be a good idea if you plan on doing a lot of boning. A santoku style knife may be good if you want a lighter knife to do a lot of veggies.
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Old 04-07-2009, 12:21 PM   #3
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I meant that the Forged Synergy was "high-end" within their International line and the TWIN Signature was "low-end" within their TWIN line. TWIN being premium while International is value.

Even if I weren't to buy a block set, which of those two, International Forged Synergy (forged) or TWIN Signature (stamped, FRIODUR) would you buy?

Keep in mind, I'm by no means a chef - I just want a nice set that looks nice in the kitchen, holds a good edge, resists stains/rust/etc.
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Old 04-07-2009, 12:25 PM   #4
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Between the two Henkels lines I'd go with the Twin, assuming it's made with a better quality steel. Forged knives aren't automatically better than stamped knives.

Bottom line, I'd also consider other brands and go by how comfortable the different knives are in my hand.
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Old 04-07-2009, 12:40 PM   #5
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I have actually held both - I like both equally. You told me what I needed to know - a well-made stamped knife with a good heat treatment can be as good and/or better than a forged knife.
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Old 04-08-2009, 04:29 AM   #6
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I own a block of Henckels five star classic knives. I use the Chef knife and the paring knife. I have never used any of the other knives (but I just use pre-sliced bread). I've had the set for about ten years now. I use the Chef knife about 95% of the time. I use the paring knife more as a compliment to the Chef knife like cutting out potatoe eyes.

For the price you're looking at you can get some lower maintenance Japanese knives like the Tojiro DP Gyuto for $50. I got my Kuhn Rikon Japanese steel paring knife for $7 at Marshal's. You could even pick up a very good bread knife at Marchal's for about $10 to $20 if you feel you have to have one.

The novelty of having a nice "showy" knife set will quickly wear off and what you'll be left with are very nice knives, better than what you've mentioned. Your wallet will also like the savings.
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Old 04-08-2009, 04:44 AM   #7
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I'm with Bladerunner - I never bought a set of knives and
make do with an 8" Chinese knife by Dexter Russell and a
paring knife - these 2 are used for 95%(or more) of my knife work.

I hone on a stone (poem there?) and when they are too dull
have a pro. sharpen them.
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