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Old 02-14-2008, 05:24 PM   #21
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Well this is their response:

Quote:
Originally Posted by I.O Shen
Dear Will
Stainless steel is a general term and has many formulae, much of which is a secret maintained by the steel manufacturer, but basically is a varied mix % of the same elements, carbon, cobalt, chromium etc. The desired result is a high degree of hardness plus stain resistance, for which there is a measuring scale called Rockwell rating. ( for precise info on how this is ascertained go on the net). The harder and higher the Rockwell rating, the better the edge and the longer the edge will maintain working sharpness, but the trade off is the brittleness factor. The hardest commercial grade of stainless steel is HRC 62% and it is not possible to make a one piece blade of this hardness, it would be too fragile, but if the manufacturer sandwiches hard steel between softer layers, the soft layers act as shock absorbers, and the blade, like any laminated structure, increases strength dramatically.
I am sorry but that is as precise an answer as we can give



Not an ideal response but hey....

To be honest i just cant ignore the quality of my new knife - it really is stupidly sharp and holds is edge longer than any other knife i have ever used, so i think ill be buying more from them....

Just thought id share me experiences with you all tough

Will
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Old 02-15-2008, 10:58 AM   #22
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In the last few years I have picked up a couple very good knives from Hattori. I have used Shun, Global, Kershaw, Kai, Kyocera and others, (I used to own a cookware store & knife sharpening business). The Hattori is as fine of a knife as I have ever had in my hand. Most of the knives discussed up-thread are way better than what is used daily in and out of commercial kitchens, and will do the job better. There is a bit of pride owning one of these hand made knives, that are absolute razor sharp and stay that way with proper use.
Hattori Damsacus Japanese Kitchen Knives at The Best Things
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Old 02-15-2008, 11:07 AM   #23
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Quote:
...HRC 62%...


To paraphrase Morbo: Rockwell scales do not work that way!

I get the feeling that response was written by a marketing person after rereading the website. At least they responded. Thanks for sharing the info and good to hear you're still loving your knife!
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Old 02-15-2008, 03:25 PM   #24
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I have a 6-inch URI Eagle Ceramic knife I bought exclusively for slicing tomatoes. I bought it at Taget Online with a gift card one of my clients gave me last Christmas. It can slice a tomato so thin you can read through it! And if I stick to using it just for tomatoes and other soft vegetables, it will probably never require sharpening in my lifetime.
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Old 02-15-2008, 09:48 PM   #25
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Gotta love the feeling of sharpening a knife to the point where its just plain ridiculously sharp - alomst too sharp lol
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Old 02-15-2008, 10:57 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caine View Post
I have a 6-inch URI Eagle Ceramic knife I bought exclusively for slicing tomatoes. I bought it at Taget Online with a gift card one of my clients gave me last Christmas. It can slice a tomato so thin you can read through it! And if I stick to using it just for tomatoes and other soft vegetables, it will probably never require sharpening in my lifetime.
And if you had a terrific Japanese made Damascus knife you would put it up for just cutting acidic things or put it up altogether. IMHO...

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Old 02-16-2008, 02:29 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by GadgetGeek View Post
And if you had a terrific Japanese made Damascus knife you would put it up for just cutting acidic things or put it up altogether. IMHO...

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Well, I agree it would be put up, someplace. I don't buy anything Japanese, ever.
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Old 02-16-2008, 03:45 PM   #28
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Me too. Not that they need protection other than washing and drying when in daily use, but when being stored they need something to prevent rust. I go a teeny bit further than just oiling. I melt bees wax into mineral oil (it stays in solution) and coat the non-stainless areas. This is the same formula I use monthly on my walnut cutting board.
Mineral oil and beeswax, great for protecting steel, and shoes. I use a product to protect and waterprrof my leather hunting boot that's made from mineral oil and beeswax. Beeswax is also great for protecting bow strings, and for chewing on when you're out in the boonies and have nothing else to do.

Ok, I've gone far enough off topic. I'm going home now.

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Old 02-18-2008, 03:26 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caine View Post
I have a 6-inch URI Eagle Ceramic knife I bought exclusively for slicing tomatoes. I bought it at Taget Online with a gift card one of my clients gave me last Christmas. It can slice a tomato so thin you can read through it! And if I stick to using it just for tomatoes and other soft vegetables, it will probably never require sharpening in my lifetime.

I'm sorry, I misspoke. I didn't buy the ceramic knife for tomatoes, I bought it to cut up lettuce without the lettuce turning brown from the metal blade of a regular knife. It does, however, slice a tomato so thin you can read through it.
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Old 02-18-2008, 06:10 PM   #30
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Well, I agree it would be put up, someplace. I don't buy anything Japanese, ever.

I find that a bizarre statement! It's like saying you wouldn't drive a German car or drink a French wine! Japanese cultery is hands-down the best in the world. The only competition I know of is from a handful of Western knifemakers trained in Japan, such as Murray Carter.

To each his own, but you're almost guaranteeing yourself of getting a poorer product than you otherwise would have by eschewing Japanese cutlery.
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