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Old 02-22-2008, 12:31 AM   #61
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Originally Posted by buzzard767 View Post
I'll purchase non-Japanese kitchen knives when American or European manufacturers match the performance. So far I haven't seen any.
As always, the man of fewer words sums it up perfectly! I'm all for buying American, but it's increasingly rare that I can find an American product of high enough quality to satisfy my needs. Try to buy a CD player made in the US (with no Asian parts, that is)- and good luck, because we can't/don't make any. At all. My preamp is Mexican (), my speakers are British, my DVD & CD players are Japanese, my HT processor is British...I think my main amp is actually made in the US, but I won't swear to it.

When it comes to knives, IME Japanese knives have next to no peers, certainly none made in America. Henckles has some very advanced knives- that are manufactured in Japan and branded for them. Aside from that, I can only think of Mora as a maker of good laminates from Europe. And that's the key: laminated knives are generally superior IMOHO. Short of making an entire knife out of V-Gold 10 or Cowry-X, laminating a very hard hagane with a softer jigane, san mai style, seems the best way to go.
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Old 02-22-2008, 09:42 AM   #62
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Sandvik's 12C27 is very good as a single-piece blade (same stuff as stainless Moras). It's not as good as, say VG-10 or 19C27, but it's tough enough to not need lamination and cheap enough to be affordable without 420 cladding. Plus, Mora hardens it up to 58HRC, resulting in a competent, if not high-middle-performance knife. That said, Tojiros and Shuns are definitely entry level for high-performance kitchen cutlery.
So...politics.
Good stuff. I'm waiting for Chicago Cutlery to start making $30 knives with Japanese geometry out of 12C27, 13C26 (AEB-L), or the like. The carbides in 13C26 are extremely small and can be sharpened to insane angles. Remember, this is what razor blades are made of. Also, it can be hardened to RcH 60+. AND IT'S STAINLESS!!!!!! It is also inexpensive.

Picture it; Chicago Cutlery, Sandvik Steel, and Chef's Choice (electric sharpeners) put their heads together and measure the size of the American market. They decide on a standard double edge 15 degrees per side. Overall geometry about like Yoshikane, thin but strong and looking (a lot) like Sabatier without the ridiculous and unnecessary bolsters. Micarta designer handles. Get Ray Ray to promote them....

I'd be the first one one the block to buy a set for everyone in my family.

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Old 02-23-2008, 11:52 AM   #63
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That would be slick. If RR promoted them, I might have to swallow my pride, blind myself to the undoubtedly gaudy colors, and try one.
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Old 02-23-2008, 01:13 PM   #64
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That would be slick. If RR promoted them, I might have to swallow my pride, blind myself to the undoubtedly gaudy colors, and try one.
Gaudy colors? You mean like this: I don't remember if I posted this knife in this forum or not. It's a Hiromoto 240 AS I had rehandled in micarta for my daughter this past Christmas. Click on the pic for a better view of the micarta.
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Old 02-23-2008, 04:00 PM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzard767 View Post
Gaudy colors? You mean like this: I don't remember if I posted this knife in this forum or not. It's a Hiromoto 240 AS I had rehandled in micarta for my daughter this past Christmas. Click on the pic for a better view of the micarta.
The handle of that knife isn't half as gaudy as that tablecloth!
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Old 02-23-2008, 04:12 PM   #66
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The handle of that knife isn't half as gaudy as that tablecloth!
Where's your Christmas spirit? Doncha see the little trees in the checkerboard squares?
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Old 02-24-2008, 03:14 PM   #67
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I thought it was an Italian restaurant tablecloth on crack!
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Old 02-24-2008, 04:40 PM   #68
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My definition of "best" in cookware is what feels good to you, looks good to you, works best for you, and that you can afford. I use a set of 40 year old Forschners, which I bought new for the same reason that I would use to purchase new knives today, if the Forschners should ever wear out. Speaking of what works for you. A Cambodian lady who I am shamelessy exploiting as a teacher as she is the best asian cook I have ever known, found one of my knives too dull for her taste, grabbed the mortar from my stone mortar and pestle, added some olive oil, and used it for a sharpener. It is about as sharp as I can make them with a couple of hundred dollars worth of stones and steels. Her explanation, that is the way she was taught to do it.
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Old 02-24-2008, 05:25 PM   #69
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Do you mean she used the pestle (the tool to pound ingredients) or did she use the side of the mortar (the bowl the pounding gets done it)? Very interesting!
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Old 02-24-2008, 06:50 PM   #70
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Used the pestle. My M & P is about 7 inches around, with a pestle around 6 inches long, and maybe 1.5 inches in diameter at the largest spot. It is also a fairly rough stone, unlike the marble small ones you see. Got it at a Cambodian food market. She considers it a small one, and we generally pound, or grind, whole spices. It takes a lot of time and energy, but you get the texture you want, and you get freshly ground herbs and/or spices. It really is a different taste. She uses lime leaves and lemongrass, which I grow in pots, a lot, and there is really no way to ground them to a paste without a
M & P.
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