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Old 02-27-2008, 11:28 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by AllenOK View Post
...

If I'm using three knives like this, ....
Ok, I would love to see that. Please have somebody take a picture of you doing this, so we could see the real thing.
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Old 02-27-2008, 11:31 AM   #42
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here, I just made a pic of my Most used (and best fave) Blade:



this May give an idea of Scale:

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Old 02-27-2008, 12:11 PM   #43
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Beautiful. Very VERY nice. I use a Japanese chukabocho (220mmX110mm) about half the time for vegetables. I rotate with some chef's knives.
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Old 03-02-2008, 02:16 PM   #44
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hollow?

I'm looking for a good chef's knife - interested in saving money - don't care how it looks or the "name" but want it to work well. I keep hearing about the Wusthof classic 8" chef but is it better to get it hollow (dimpled) or not?
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Old 03-02-2008, 07:52 PM   #45
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I'm looking for a good chef's knife - interested in saving money - don't care how it looks or the "name" but want it to work well. I keep hearing about the Wusthof classic 8" chef but is it better to get it hollow (dimpled) or not?
Here is the best chef's knife for the money in the world. You have to be nice to it, and it might require professional sharpening once a year or so if you can't do it yourself. It will give you pleasure and great cuts beyond anything you've used before, and the cost is low.

On the other hand, if you're going to toss the knife into the sink or dishwasher, get the Wustof.
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Old 03-02-2008, 10:28 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by buzzard767 View Post
Here is the best chef's knife for the money in the world. You have to be nice to it, and it might require professional sharpening once a year or so if you can't do it yourself. It will give you pleasure and great cuts beyond anything you've used before, and the cost is low.

On the other hand, if you're going to toss the knife into the sink or dishwasher, get the Wustof.
+1 on the Tojiro- awesome for the money, although my personal preference is for the 240mm over the 210mm.

If you really want something decent on the cheap, I think an 8" Forschner Fibrox is about $25 or so. It's not the equal of the Tijiro but it's less than 1/2 the cost and probably a tad more robust. I'd pick the Tojiro myself, but the Fibrox is superb for the money.
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Old 03-03-2008, 03:42 PM   #47
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+1 on the Tojiro- awesome for the money, although my personal preference is for the 240mm over the 210mm.

If you really want something decent on the cheap, I think an 8" Forschner Fibrox is about $25 or so. It's not the equal of the Tijiro but it's less than 1/2 the cost and probably a tad more robust. I'd pick the Tojiro myself, but the Fibrox is superb for the money.
Rob - The reason I said 210mm is because 99% of the chef's knives sold in the US are 8" and most santokus are 7". This is what people are used to.

I think the Forschners with or without the fibrox handles are fine, and, their edges match most consumer sharpeners. I have a couple fibrox handles and feel that although they make a lot of sense in a commercial kitchen or packing house they aren't very attractive in a home kitchen.

I'm sure Cath would fall in love with the Tojiros but sharpening is an issue. Even if she sent the knife out once a year for sharpening she would still have to have a glass smooth steel to keep the edge aligned, almost doubling her total cost.

Cath - those hollow dimples as you put it are called grantons and whether they do anything or not is an highly debated issue. Personally I don't think they do much if anything. I think they may have originated as a copycat thing taken from traditional Japanese knives with a single edge. The backs of those knives look flat but are actually hollow ground (slightly concave). The reason has nothing to do with whether or not food sticks to them and everything to do with the quality of the cut.
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Old 03-03-2008, 04:47 PM   #48
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Ok, here's a good picture of what I do:





If I'm using three knives like this, the third knife would go on the right side of the first two, and my middle finger would be in between the blades just like my index finger is. My ring and pinky fingers would encircle the handles opposite my thumb. You've got to have rather dextrous fingers for this, as well as good finger strength.




Add a 4th knife and you'll be Freddy Krueger...
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Old 03-03-2008, 06:18 PM   #49
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Rob - The reason I said 210mm is because 99% of the chef's knives sold in the US are 8" and most santokus are 7". This is what people are used to.

I think the Forschners with or without the fibrox handles are fine, and, their edges match most consumer sharpeners. I have a couple fibrox handles and feel that although they make a lot of sense in a commercial kitchen or packing house they aren't very attractive in a home kitchen.

I'm sure Cath would fall in love with the Tojiros but sharpening is an issue. Even if she sent the knife out once a year for sharpening she would still have to have a glass smooth steel to keep the edge aligned, almost doubling her total cost.
Well, she did specifically ask about an 8 inch knife; I was just interjecting my personal opinion. Since I cook professionally and often have to process large quantities at a time I like the longer blade. Actually, 10" was my favorite size until I got my first 240mm. That little bit of difference makes the knife much more "nimble" for lack of a better term. I wish that the common santoku size was between 6 and 6.6- the 7 is too much like a chef knife.

I like the looks of the Fibrox handles (it's probably the geek in me!), and more importantly I like the feel. And they're NSF certified, a good thing for knives that will see professional use. The Rosewood line is probably more decorator-friendly but a bit more expensive.

Perhaps sharpening would be an issue for the Tojiro, but all knives have to be sharpened. There are some cheap and effective ways to sharpen a German style knife that you wouldn't use on a Tojiro, especially the Edgemaker Pros that I'm always going on about. I'm not sure it makes sense to include a steel in the overall price as it's my contention that a smooth steel is superior no matter what you're honing. Good ceramics start at about $20 and are useful for every non-serrated knife in the kitchen. Cath doesn't mention her sharpening talents or lack thereof, and I don't want to simply assume she doesn't know how to do it, but if that's an issue I'd suggest either having it professionally done or buying a Spyderco Sharpmaker. Of course, that assumes there's someone trustworthy and competant she can have sharpen 'em (Chico would say there's no such thing as a trustworthy tinker, but you know what I mean...).

Overall, I think the Forschner is a bit more "user friendly" to a home cook that simply wants to have a decent knife but isn't a knife geek.
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Old 03-18-2008, 11:16 PM   #50
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I really love looking at everyone's opinion here! Everyone has their own, very specific opinion of what works and what does not.

Personally I keep one 8 inch Henckels chef knife, one 3 1/2" Wusthoff paring knife and one 6" Wusthoff boning knife razor sharp and on duty at all times. The wife, kids, visiting relatives, etc. can use the rest whenever they want. They are also free to throw those other knives in the dishwasher.

Mine will be handwashed as they are used and dried with a towel before being stowed away in the knife block. I keep them sharp enough to cut paper or shave with.

I do not need another knife but I would really love to learn superior knife handling/cutting techniques.
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