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View Poll Results: Average Cost for Knife ($)
0-10 2 10.53%
10-40 6 31.58%
40-80 4 21.05%
80-120 3 15.79%
120-200 4 21.05%
200-400 1 5.26%
400-1000 2 10.53%
1000-3000 0 0%
3000+ 0 0%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 19. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-22-2012, 10:47 AM   #11
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I'm a home cook who was gifted a set of Henckels Pro S knives some years ago. I'd guess the prices if the individual pieces run from $30-$150. Before that I had (and still have a set of Chicago Cutlery knives that cost $99 in total at the time.

I use the Henckels mostly but the CC knives go on vacation with me for use in our timeshare kitchen.
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Old 10-24-2012, 11:58 AM   #12
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Thanks for all the replies and votes everyone!

As expected I thought the most common would be in the $10-40 range. I'm kind of surprised there was only one vote for $0-10, but maybe there aren't too many knives in that category?
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Old 10-24-2012, 12:28 PM   #13
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I have two sets of Wusthof classic. The advantage I had when got them, I got them at below wholesale price, my neighbor used to work for the distributor. I do have couple of nice Japanese sushi knives that were more like $80 to a $100 dollars. I have couple of handmade knives that I made myself and if I were to sell them I would charge at least a $100 per one. Unfortunatelly I have no means to make more anymore.
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Old 10-24-2012, 01:32 PM   #14
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I guess the only one I bought new was an OXO Santoku for $19. There's a nice chef's knife that was a gift. A longer chef's, a commercial knife from the flea market. It had been one of those restaurant rent-a-knives where they're regularly replaced with sharpened knives. A big slicing knife and a very nice thin carbon steel blade from the flea market. Bread knife and serrated knife from garage sales. A hug, very heavy old carbon steel butcher knife that's so big it's mostly for show. Probably less than $50 in all.
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Old 10-25-2012, 11:49 AM   #15
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Awesome to see that 2 people are in the $400-1000 category :)

Now, I notice that many of us are in the $10-40 category, me included. Surely there are a couple things we must find that that could use improvement on the knife?

I'll probably make a separate thread about that some time, but it's an interesting thing to think about. I'm so used to people that buy knives in the $200+ range, that the things they nitpick about are negligible to most normal cooks.
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Old 10-26-2012, 05:24 AM   #16
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I'm a knife nerd and pro cook, but it's hard for me to imagine the average price of ones knives being in the $400-$1000 range! Certainly there are some great knives at that price but there are so many outstanding blades between $175-$325 that it would amaze me if one didn't buy in that range, assuming one has the funds. Most of the knives I most lust after are under $500, although of course there are some spendy ones I'd love to add to my collection!
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Old 10-26-2012, 06:20 AM   #17
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I personally think (IMHO) that the more time the final worker spends just honing the knife to what he/she considers ideal is what adds to the final cost. More hours, more cost. With a good whet stone and some oil, anyone can learn to sharpen their knives to their liking. And it doesn't have to be an ultra expensive one. But first you have to buy a knife that is made of metal you think is the proper one for sharpening. It could be that $1 one you bought ten of at the State Fair. Once they no longer can be sharpened, toss it and start with a new one.

I have had a few on them over the years. They are great for digging out the tomato stem, eyes on a potato, blemishes on turnips, julienning veggies, etc. They sharpen up quickly and do the job you ask of it. The blade is small as is the handle. Makes a great paring knife. Does the job just as well as that $300 one. Because your hand is closer to the product you are using it on, you have more control. Maybe even better. Not heavy in the palm of your hand. And balanced evenly. the plastic handle weighs just as much as the blade. They are made from secondary metals left over from the trimings of other products. Remelted and found a new use for.
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Old 10-26-2012, 12:12 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I personally think (IMHO) that the more time the final worker spends just honing the knife to what he/she considers ideal is what adds to the final cost. More hours, more cost. With a good whet stone and some oil, anyone can learn to sharpen their knives to their liking. And it doesn't have to be an ultra expensive one. But first you have to buy a knife that is made of metal you think is the proper one for sharpening. It could be that $1 one you bought ten of at the State Fair. Once they no longer can be sharpened, toss it and start with a new one.

I have had a few on them over the years. They are great for digging out the tomato stem, eyes on a potato, blemishes on turnips, julienning veggies, etc. They sharpen up quickly and do the job you ask of it. The blade is small as is the handle. Makes a great paring knife. Does the job just as well as that $300 one. Because your hand is closer to the product you are using it on, you have more control. Maybe even better. Not heavy in the palm of your hand. And balanced evenly. the plastic handle weighs just as much as the blade. They are made from secondary metals left over from the trimings of other products. Remelted and found a new use for.
Thanks for the response Addie - good things to think about.

I would like to chime in that the final stage of sharpening for most knifemakers (if they even choose to do so, from a custom maker standpoint), is one of the least time consuming processes unless if they take it to an incredibly keen edge, which would indeed be considered into final cost usually. Many times, hand made kitchen knives have a very basic edge or none at all, leaving it to the buyer to put on their own preferred edge.

I do agree with inexpensive paring knives, as they're usually the knives used for quick cuts here and there without worry of heavy maintenance. Workhorse chef's knives on the other hand though, can easily justify a price of several hundred dollars.
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Old 10-26-2012, 12:21 PM   #19
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Only if you have a job that demands and can pay for knives of that caliber. Even when I had a catering business, the work I performed did NOT require a knife of any sort that cost over $200. Now that I am a serious home cook, I still don't need a fancy array of knives.

I do like to look at the good knives though, but that's more of a knife fetish than a need. I also look at swords...
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Old 10-26-2012, 03:44 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Nguyen View Post
Thanks for the response Addie - good things to think about.

I would like to chime in that the final stage of sharpening for most knifemakers (if they even choose to do so, from a custom maker standpoint), is one of the least time consuming processes unless if they take it to an incredibly keen edge, which would indeed be considered into final cost usually. Many times, hand made kitchen knives have a very basic edge or none at all, leaving it to the buyer to put on their own preferred edge.

I do agree with inexpensive paring knives, as they're usually the knives used for quick cuts here and there without worry of heavy maintenance. Workhorse chef's knives on the other hand though, can easily justify a price of several hundred dollars.
I can't tell you how many paring knives have gotten tossed out with the peelings in error.
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