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Old 03-09-2006, 10:32 PM   #1
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Reccomend a Trimming Knife for me.

Hey guys. I like to buy Ribeye steaks, as i love their tremendous flavor. The only thing is i hate fat on steaks, so i meticulously trim these steaks after cooking them.

Reccomend me a knife, preferably japanese, as i like that style, to trim the fat off of meats.

I am looking for a small knife, delicate, but RAZOR SHARP and TOP QUALITY STEEL. Looking to spend around 100-150 dollars on it.

Thanks in advance guys!!!

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Old 03-09-2006, 10:46 PM   #2
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I just use my chef's knife. It's not about the knife, it's about the knife skills. Practice your knife skills and you won't needs a ton of knives.
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Old 03-09-2006, 10:47 PM   #3
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Ironchef, honestly i have an enthusiasm for knives that goes above practicality. I want to build up a fantastic collection of high quality knives.

I'd like to have a knife reccomended for the purpose i described.
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Old 03-09-2006, 10:51 PM   #4
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I guess a 6" utility knife would work the best because the smaller size blade will give you more manuverability. I only buy Henckles so I'd have to recommend their utility knife. I'm sure you can find a good Global, Shun, or Wustof-Trident knife of the same type.
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Old 03-09-2006, 10:53 PM   #5
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6 Inch utility? Will definitely check those out. Thanks brother.
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Old 03-09-2006, 11:40 PM   #6
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ttt for more replies.
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Old 03-10-2006, 11:29 AM   #7
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Ironchef is right.

There are certain things, like boning, where the attribute of a knife comes into play. A boning knife is relatively long, thin and flexible.

Bread knives are usually serrated. Paring knives are short.

But trimming fat from meat really doesn't require a particular knife. What butchers use is a big knife that looks like huge steak knife.

Utility knives aren't designed for any particular purpose in mind, hence their name. A chef's knife will trim fat off meat just as well as a utility knife. SO will a steak knife. Or a santuko. A santuko would work very well -- it's meant for slicing.

It's all about how sharp the knife is and how well you use it.
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Old 03-10-2006, 08:18 PM   #8
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Well if you want to spend the money...

I absoluely *love* my ceramic knives. They're just the greatest things ever. A 6" Santoku knife would do you well if you want to go that route.

Or if you prefer actual metal...the only type of metal knives I use are from Mac, and this one would probably be the one I'd recommend. It doesn't cost as much as you said you wanted to spend, but what you're describing doesn't really need an expensive knife.

Thing is though...different people have different hands, so you have to find a brand that fits your hand. Tons of people just swear by Henckel...but they don't feel right in my hand, so they're useless to me. I hate em. It's all a amtter of comfort.
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Old 03-10-2006, 08:23 PM   #9
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Poppinfresh, I am interested in the "ceramic" knife - I never heard of this - please elaborate. Also, do you use mac knives? I have never heard of this knife before.
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Old 03-10-2006, 08:53 PM   #10
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Um, ceramic knives in a nutshell...

They're more expensive than steel/carbon knives. However, they're MUCH sharper. You've gotta be really careful with them and have some mad chops. They aren't dishwasher safe. You don't have to steel them with each use like you would a "normal" knife. When they get dull or chip (yes, they chip if you misuse/abuse them--they're ceramic, after all), you have to have them sent in to get resharpened and honed--you can't do it at home (not that I'd recommend that with ANY knife), and most professional sharpening services can't do them. Some companies sell ceramic sharpeners, but...yeah. Don't even get me started on that. The upside is it's usually free to have them serviced. Kyocera makes a good ceramic knife at a fairly reasonable price at all 3 levels (beginner, mid range and professional). Probably what I'd recommend for someone's first set so long as they felt comfortable.

As for Mac knives...they're predominately sushi knives but they make all sorts of traditional ones. They're made in Japan using high carbon steel, chrome and tungsten as well as a couple other metals I can't pronounce, so they're harder and more durable than most blades...they're something like 60 degrees Rockwell in terms of hardness. They aren't dishwasher safe, either. They don't rust or stain that I know of.

In terms of seeing them in action...I know Rob Rainford on License to Grill uses Mac knives. I'm 99% certain that Ming Tsai (Simply Ming, East Meets West) uses ceramic knives, though what brand I dont' know.
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