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Old 06-19-2007, 12:26 PM   #31
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I have Henkles myself, I got them when I went to culinary school. I love my knives, but the baldes are not for everyone. I suggest you do a little research and perhaps also go to a kitchen store and handle a few of the knives to see if you like their balance. Some people love Henkles while others applaud Ginzu, its all a matter of how it feels to you.

This discussion reminds me of an episode of America's Test Kitchen. They put out Cooks Illustrated, at any rate, both are great resources to find out a little more about things like knives.
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Old 06-19-2007, 01:22 PM   #32
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The only one who applauds Ginzu is Chef Tony!

If you can afford one, the best chef's knife I've ever used was my 10-inch Friedrick Dick, which my former S.O. absconded with when she skulked off. I had just had it sharpened, too. I hope she cut off a finger with it!
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Old 06-19-2007, 01:34 PM   #33
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I had a knife salesman come to my door once, he took one look at my Henkles and left, they could not beat my knives. I sharpen them myself, a good sharpening stone and my steel keep them nearly razor sharp.
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Old 06-23-2007, 06:58 PM   #34
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Hi,

Thanks everyone for the help. I ended up buying a Wusthof Classic 8" Cooks knife and a Henckles Diamond Steel. I really like the knife :) I wasn't able to try any knives out as where I live there is nothing like that to try. But I'm happy with the knife I ended up with.

I'm looking at my next purchase and am thinking to get a small knife for smaller jobs.

Thanks everyone!
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Old 07-18-2007, 03:28 PM   #35
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I have the Wusthof Grand Prix 8 inch. I love it! I have small hands and it works well for me. I paid about 100.00, maybe a bit less, at a local gourmet store.
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Old 07-23-2007, 09:51 AM   #36
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Hi Everyone,
I read the four pages of posts and didn't read of a significant factor of the steel in the knife blade. The steel blade can be any kind of carbon steel or stainless steel blend or combination but to produce the blade it can be done in one of two ways. A long strip of steel gets fed into a progressive punch press breaker and blank knives are punched out of the strips. The steel is then sent to the grinding shop and the blade gets an edge, blade face, taper etc. This produces alot of knives faster and cheaper and can be just fine but it comes at a price. The crystal structure of the steel is not set in a uniform pattern to the finished product. Imagine a thick piece of cardboard compared to the same thickness of oak. What happens is the steel can dull much faster (imagine a piece of cardboard on edge sawing at a newspaper getting broomed out but a board on edge not wearing) There are other things that can happen too.

The other process to making a knife blade is to hot forge it. The steel when forged hot has the crystal structure of the steel aligned with the blade as it cools so it holds the edge better and sharpens easier One could say the steel has a better grain to it. Forging takes more time and there are multiple forging methods to further impove the performance of the steel. Forged knives will cost more but endure far more. Its not just the ingredients of the steel but the process it went through to be a knife that effects the performance.

I do have some stamped and ground knives as well as forged. My 10" bread knife is stamped and ground. My chef knifes are forged and my test for sharp is I wet shave some hair off the back of my hand.
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Old 07-23-2007, 12:38 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oneoffour
Hi Everyone,
IMy chef knifes are forged and my test for sharp is I wet shave some hair off the back of my hand.
Don't forget the Aqua Velva!
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Old 07-23-2007, 05:59 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oneoffour
Hi Everyone,
I read the four pages of posts and didn't read of a significant factor of the steel in the knife blade.

Your post was correct but there is much more. Although the manufacturers closely guard the information, almost all knives manufactured in Switzerland, Germany, France, the UK etc are from 440A stainless steel. The reason is that although 440A can be brought to a reasonable edge, the most important factor is that it is extremely high in chromium making it nearly immune to rust. Oh yeah, in comparison to a lot of other, better steels, it's cheap. Imagine that. They want this attribute because most people abuse their knives to no end. Another thing is that most of the edges are ground to 25 degrees per side. So are axes. I believe the Chef's Choice electric sharpeners and their ilk roughly match that dimension.

Okay, what's the problem? First of all, in the real world of knife blades, 440A is at the low end of the totum pole. 440A blades (and blades made of several other steels) are nicknamed "beaters". Personally, I think your 440's should be replaced by either Japanese cook's knives or French Sabatier Theirs-Issard 4-Star Elephant CARBON STEEL knives.

Now, I know you aren't going to jump on the Internet and follow my advice, soooooo, here's how you can improve your cooking experiences immensely. Take your Forschners, Wushoffs, Henkels, whatever, to a professional sharpener and tell him you want your edges ground to 15 degrees per side, polished, and stropped. If he's any good at all he'll "know" AND be able to produce the desired result. This enhances blade performance dramatically. You will then have a chef's knife that will practically cut through a tomato under its own weight. You will LOVE it. It makes food prep easier and is safer due to the blade not slipping. Just don't touch it to "see" how sharp it is. You'll be seeing red.

BUT, you have to do your part. As I said before, knives are sold to people who abuse them, the lowest common denominator if you will. You can't throw your new edges into the dishwasher, toss them into a drawer with a bunch of other steel, et al. Here's what you do:

1) Put your electric sharpener in the garbage. well, all right, you can keep it if you promise not to use it on your 15 degree edges as you will ruin them.

2) If you must have electric, get on line and buy a Shun - 16 degrees per side.

3) Toss all those grooved steels into the recycling bin. They rip up edges like nobody's business and will ruin your edge just like the electrics..

4) Buy a SMOOTH steel. These realign the edge but do not remove any steel. This is vital and they should be used BEFORE you use your knife. Alternatively, use the edge of your baking dish for the same purpose. Not kidding. It works. Glass is harder than steel and that is all you need.

5) Keep them in a block or on a magnetic rack.

6) In your home kitchen, your edge should last close to a year if you do it right. Once the edge realligning is not bringing the cutting power back to where you know it should be, send them back to the pro for resharpening, or, if you're a do it yourselfer, use the Shun I told you about. Please don't talk to me about stones as not one in a hundred use them properly. If you must grind your knives yourself, buy an EdgePro for perfect angles, but that's another story.

I do know what I'm talking about, so if you have questions, fire away.

Buzz
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Old 07-23-2007, 09:42 PM   #39
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I don't have a smooth steel but I do have a heavy smooth ceramic steel. All my knives are in those plastic blade guard sheaths. I would suggest looking for the block that has the blades horizontal not vertical since the vertical slits let the blade edge ride into the wood as you insert or withdraw them. LOL isn't there always more?
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Old 07-24-2007, 12:53 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oneoffour
I don't have a smooth steel but I do have a heavy smooth ceramic steel. All my knives are in those plastic blade guard sheaths. I would suggest looking for the block that has the blades horizontal not vertical since the vertical slits let the blade edge ride into the wood as you insert or withdraw them. LOL isn't there always more?
I put my blades into the vertical slots of my block edge-side up. It keeps the edge from riding on the wood.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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