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Old 02-04-2009, 07:24 PM   #1
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Exclamation Santoku knife help wanted!

Hello everybody…I am not a chef yet but I hope to be one day… I have been cooking for several years and I think is my thing… anyway… I am writing because I am in a dilemma… I want to buy a good santoku knife but I can’t really choose one… so I am asking for your opinion…

Questions:
1. Legnth (I am thinking a 7 inch)
2. What type of blade? (Plain or hollowed-escalloped Edge)
3 Which brand? (Kershaw Shun, Victorinox, Stellar, James Martin, Henckels or Global?)
(I can spend till 120 euros)

Thanks in advance…

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Old 02-04-2009, 07:27 PM   #2
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What will you specifically be using it for? That will help you know what type of blade to look for
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Old 02-04-2009, 07:41 PM   #3
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general cooking...
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Old 02-05-2009, 08:48 AM   #4
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Do you already have a chef's knife that you use?

If so I'd recommend getting a Nakiri rather than a Santoku. A very simplified explanation is that the Santoku design combines the benefits of the Nakiri and a Western Chef's knife, but the two 'parent' designs are more efficient at their specialised roles than what a Santoku is.

Generally speaking I would avoid most Western blade manufacturers when it comes to a Santoku or Nakiri as the blade design is predicated on using a strong thin blade. I'm not a Japanese expert, but some Western blades that use the right type of steel with the design are:
Fallkniven White Whale
Solicut Absolute ML
Robert Herder (German Carbon Steel blade maker)
Scanpan Damastahl range (avoid their Classic range for this type of knife)

PS I don't know how these fit into your price range, other side of the world and all that.
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Old 02-05-2009, 09:37 AM   #5
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[quote=jpaulg;787637]Do you already have a chef's knife that you use?

If so I'd recommend getting a Nakiri rather than a Santoku. quote]

i have a usuba and a sashimi...
as for a chef's knife... the one i have is not that good that is way i am looking for a santoku...
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Old 02-05-2009, 11:29 AM   #6
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If you want to be a chef, get a chef's knife rather that a santuko.

Chef's knives are more versatile and have a curved blade so that you can "rock and roll" the knife while chopping.

Santukos have a straight blade more suitable for slicing.

Never buy a knife of any kind without holding it and trying it first.
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Old 02-05-2009, 11:33 AM   #7
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I got a Wustoff santuko for Christmas. I wouldn't have bought one for myself, but, now I use it more than my chef's knife. The escalloped edge is great for chopping onions or mincing garlic, and for precision cutting. I think the edge is a great benefit.
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Old 02-05-2009, 12:19 PM   #8
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Victorinox

These people also make the swiss army knives! The blade is not to heavy and nice an inexpensive. It has the graton on the side of the blade so slices fall away easily. Santoku roughly translated means "3 uses", slicing, dicing, and chopping.

I know they have one at KitchensOnTheSquare.com

I've bought stuff on this site before and they ship super fast!
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Old 02-05-2009, 04:52 PM   #9
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Sunshine,

If this is to be your main knife a Santoku is a valid choice. I use a Chef's knife and a Nakiri and have sold off my Santokus.
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Old 02-05-2009, 06:00 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunshine_thess View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpaulg View Post
Do you already have a chef's knife that you use?

If so I'd recommend getting a Nakiri rather than a Santoku.
i have a usuba and a sashimi...
as for a chef's knife... the one i have is not that good that is way i am looking for a santoku...
While they look superficially similar an usuba and a nakiri are different. The usuba in single beveled and the nakiri is double beveled. I won't try to talk you out of a santoku if you really want one but if your gyuto or chef's knife is working for you you should replace it first. A chef's knife is more useful than a santoku, especially if you want to work in a commercial kitchen.

That said, if your chef's knife sucks and you aren't going to replace it, then I'd probably choose a santoku over a nakiri. The latter will be fantastic for veggies (better for some work than the gyuto) but the lack of a point will make rocking/chopping impossible. Plus, you really need a sharp tip for some type of work.

I agree with jpaulg, steer away from western makers for your santokus or nakiris. It's not that they're no good, they're just not likely to be as ideal as a Japanese version. Western companies that have lost market share to their Nipponese rivals are starting to change their products to be more competitive (eg the Henckels Twin Cermax, made in Japan) but overall you're still better off with an Asian. Buzz has mentioned them before, but you might want to poke around a bit at JapaneseChefKnife.com Lots of good stuff, flat $7 shipping.
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