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Old 10-05-2012, 02:52 PM   #41
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The major difference is that the polypropelene grips on the two smaller knives are slightly indented along the length, while the grip on the chef's knife isn't; and the fibrox grip has a slightly more matte finish. With a chef's knife, I tend to wrap my hand around the grip (like shaking hands) but with a paring knife, my thumb is on the side of the grip and fits into the indentation. The whole point is that for $44 I think you get a great deal, especially when you consider that moderately-priced 8" chef's knives start at twice that and up!
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Old 10-05-2012, 03:21 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mario
The major difference is that the polypropelene grips on the two smaller knives are slightly indented along the length, while the grip on the chef's knife isn't; and the fibrox grip has a slightly more matte finish. With a chef's knife, I tend to wrap my hand around the grip (like shaking hands) but with a paring knife, my thumb is on the side of the grip and fits into the indentation. The whole point is that for $44 I think you get a great deal, especially when you consider that moderately-priced 8" chef's knives start at twice that and up!
Thanks! I was asking because TJ Maxx also had an 8" Wusthof Silverpoint Chet's knife that I was considering. Trying to decide if the Victorinox fibrox 8" knife would be a better choice.
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Old 10-05-2012, 04:32 PM   #43
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Hand made

You can get great hand made Santoku and other style Japanese knives for reasonable prices. I'm going to just talk about the ones that have the western style double bevel edge. Typically a knife is hardened (tempered) along the cutting edge and gets softer towards the back edge. This is so it won't be too brittle. As the knife is sharpened over the years the edge moves back and the metal gets softer. The hand made Japanese knives are made with an inner layer of hardened steel sandwiched between two layers of softer steel, or even wrought iron, so they remain the same nor matter how many times they are sharpened. Also, the process of heating the metal in coal, then hammering, then quenching works wonders. I have a Santoku made by this guy that cost me around $80 (from Japan Woodworker) and it is just outstanding.
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Old 10-05-2012, 04:37 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchengoddess8 View Post
Thanks! I was asking because TJ Maxx also had an 8" Wusthof Silverpoint Chet's knife that I was considering. Trying to decide if the Victorinox fibrox 8" knife would be a better choice.
use and like this: type301 - CHROMA Cnife

The site will show you all of their knives. I use the 10 inch chef's knife. My son uses both the 10 inch, and 8 inch chef's knife, He also had the Santoku, before someone where he worked used it when he'd stepped out for a break, and they abused and broke it. I love that strange shaped handle. Though it is smooth steel, it makes the knife super easy to clean and sterilize, and provides excellent control in both the x and y planes of motion. It also reduces side to side roll.

And I'm not sure why, but even when my hands are goopy and slippery, I have no problem hanging on securely to the knife handle.

There are a bunch of useable knives out there. Your budget, the size of your hands, cutting style, etc. determine what kind of knife is best for you. Just be aware of the many different styles of knives. That gives you more options, and will make selecting the right knife more attainable.

Even the way you sharpen a knife is argued upon. What bevel is the best for the chore and kind of knife you are using. Should the edge be serated, or scalloped, or smooth? Should you look for a compound bevel, a convex bevel, a chisel bevel, etc.? There is a lot more to keeping a great knife than one would think. And if used properly, and kept sharp, sometimes a $10 knife from your favorite box store can perform nearly as well as a knife that costs $1000. Ok, I'll shut up now. There is so much information available about knifes that it can be downright confusing. Don't be confused. Just get a knife that suits you.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 10-05-2012, 04:54 PM   #45
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You already have a paring knife so the only real extra for you is the 4.5" serrated knife if you buy the Victorinox 3-piece set. The set costs $44.40 (no shipping costs and no sales tax, at least in MA); the 8" chef's knife by itself costs $36.25, so you can see why I bought the set. It really just depends on the price of the Wusthof: if it's under $36 go with Wusthof; over $36, then decide if it's worth the difference between that price and $44 to get 2 more knives (1 of which is superfluous).
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Old 10-05-2012, 05:39 PM   #46
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Good advice and good comment with this as the core message;
"the best knife for you is the highest quality knife you can afford, and fits your needs."

If I can help you with a selection, let me know.
chef@yoursmartkitchen.com
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Old 10-05-2012, 09:30 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mario
You already have a paring knife so the only real extra for you is the 4.5" serrated knife if you buy the Victorinox 3-piece set. The set costs $44.40 (no shipping costs and no sales tax, at least in MA); the 8" chef's knife by itself costs $36.25, so you can see why I bought the set. It really just depends on the price of the Wusthof: if it's under $36 go with Wusthof; over $36, then decide if it's worth the difference between that price and $44 to get 2 more knives (1 of which is superfluous).
Thanks! I think the Wusthof is under $30 - will check tomorrow. What do you use the serrated knife for? Is it only for bread?
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Old 10-05-2012, 09:33 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North

use and like this: type301 - CHROMA Cnife

The site will show you all of their knives. I use the 10 inch chef's knife. My son uses both the 10 inch, and 8 inch chef's knife, He also had the Santoku, before someone where he worked used it when he'd stepped out for a break, and they abused and broke it. I love that strange shaped handle. Though it is smooth steel, it makes the knife super easy to clean and sterilize, and provides excellent control in both the x and y planes of motion. It also reduces side to side roll.
Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
The Chroma knives look really cool. I didn't see any prices on the site. Where did you buy them?
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Old 10-05-2012, 09:39 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stock Pot
You can get great hand made Santoku and other style Japanese knives for reasonable prices. I'm going to just talk about the ones that have the western style double bevel edge. Typically a knife is hardened (tempered) along the cutting edge and gets softer towards the back edge. This is so it won't be too brittle. As the knife is sharpened over the years the edge moves back and the metal gets softer. The hand made Japanese knives are made with an inner layer of hardened steel sandwiched between two layers of softer steel, or even wrought iron, so they remain the same nor matter how many times they are sharpened. Also, the process of heating the metal in coal, then hammering, then quenching works wonders. I have a Santoku made by this guy that cost me around $80 (from Japan Woodworker) and it is just outstanding.
Wow, it was fascinating to see how these knives were made!
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Old 10-05-2012, 09:42 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yogiwan
Good advice and good comment with this as the core message;
"the best knife for you is the highest quality knife you can afford, and fits your needs."

If I can help you with a selection, let me know.
chef@yoursmartkitchen.com
Thank you! I may take you up on that. There's so much information to absorb!
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